Wanted (2008) Poster

Wanted (2008)

  • Rate: 6.7/10 total 152,803 votes 
  • Genre: Action | Crime | Thriller
  • Release Date: 27 June 2008 (USA)
  • Runtime: 110 min
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Wanted (2008)

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  • IMDb page: Wanted (2008)
  • Rate: 6.7/10 total 152,803 votes 
  • Genre: Action | Crime | Thriller
  • Release Date: 27 June 2008 (USA)
  • Runtime: 110 min
  • Filming Location: Barrandov Studios, Prague, Czech Republic
  • Budget: $75,000,000(estimated)
  • Gross: $134,294,280(USA)(14 September 2008)
  • Director: Timur Bekmambetov
  • Stars: Angelina Jolie, James McAvoy and Morgan Freeman
  • Original Music By: Danny Elfman   
  • Soundtrack: Escape (The Piña Colada Song)
  • Sound Mix: Dolby Digital | DTS | SDDS
  • Plot Keyword: Fraternity | Assassin | Killer | Boss | Superhuman

Writing Credits By:

  • Michael Brandt (screenplay) &
  • Derek Haas (screenplay) and
  • Chris Morgan (screenplay)
  • Michael Brandt (story) &
  • Derek Haas (story)
  • Mark Millar (comic book series) and
  • J.G. Jones (comic book series)

Known Trivia

  • This is director Timur Bekmambetov’s first American film.
  • Originally a comic book by Top Cow Productions written by Mark Millar.
  • In the office at the end of the film a nameplate is visible on one of the cubicle walls. The nameplate reads “J.G Millar” which is a composite of writer Mark Millar and artist J.G. Jones, on whose comic the film is based.
  • Screenwriters Michael Brandt and Derek Haas named several of the movie’s characters after people from their college alma mater, Baylor University. Robert Darden, the name of Wesley’s first target for assassination, is the writing professor in whose class they first met. (They have used the name Darden for the first victim in several other films, as well: 3:10 to Yuma and 2 Fast 2 Furious). Sloan, the character played by Morgan Freeman, is taken from the university’s previous president, who was forced to step down under pressure from faculty and alumni.
  • One of Cross’ victims is identified by the Gunsmith as “Rictus”. The main antagonist in the comic book is Mister Rictus.
  • For the Russian dubbing, many Russian film stars from Night Watch, Day Watch and The Irony of Fate 2 took part: Sergey Bezrukov for James McAvoy, Galina Tyunina for Angelina Jolie, Yuriy Kutsenko, Valeriy Zolotukhin and others. The Russian dubbing script was written by Sergey Lukyanenko.
  • After Wesley leaves his job, you can see a sign for “Wicked: The Musical” in the background. Producer Marc Platt produced the Broadway show.
  • The man pictured in the poster next to Cross’ shoulder when he is on the train is the president of the Czech Republic, Václav Klaus.
  • Angelina Jolie says she based her role on Clint Eastwood.
  • The first film to use Red Digital Cinema’s Red One digital cameras. Several prototypes were used, alongside film cameras, to shoot about ten scenes. However, no Red One footage appears in the final cut of the film.

Goofs: Continuity: Just before Wesley and Fox jump over the roof of the train for the first time, Fox is wearing high-heeled boots. After they jump, Fox is wearing flat boots. Also, just before Fox ducks under the bridge, she's wearing high heels again. This was possibly intentional due to the "sexy look" of the high heels, but short heels were obviously more practical.

Plot: A frustrated office worker learns that he is the son of a professional assassin, and that he shares his father's superhuman killing abilities. Full summary »  »

Story: A young man finds out his long lost father is an assassin. When his father is murdered, the son is recruited into his father's old organization and trained by a man named Sloan to follow in his dad's footsteps.Written by Anonymous  

Synopsis

Synopsis: A young man named Wesley Gibson (James McAvoy) works at a dead-end job with an overbearing boss. He takes anti-depressants when he feels stressed out. His live-in girlfriend is sleeping with his best friend. He speaks of how his father left when he was just one week old. He wonders if maybe when he was born his father looked into his eyes and saw a failure.

Elsewhere, a man called "Mr. X" (David O’Hara) meets with a ballistics expert to find out who made a particular bullet for a "competitor". She observes that the bullet is "clean", i.e., not traceable to a particular gun. (As becomes clear later, this is because it is the last stage of a multi-stage bullet.) Suddenly, a sniper shoots the ballistics expert in the head from a nearby building. Mr. X leaps through the window and shoots his opponents in mid-flight, killing them. He lands on the building and begins talking to a man on a cell phone, unaware that he is standing on a marked spot. He notices it as the man, named Cross fires a multi-stage bullet from across town, killing Mr. X by going through the back of his head and out through his forehead (the flight of the bullet is shown in slow-motion, backward).

One night at a pharmacy, Gibson meets a mysterious woman who tells him his father was an elite assassin who had been killed the day before. Gibson replies that his father abandoned him a week after his birth. At that moment, Cross appears, gun in hand. The woman opens fire on Cross. Gibson and the woman escape from the resulting shoot-out and have a wild car chase in the streets of Chicago. The woman brings Gibson to the headquarters of The Fraternity, a thousand-year-old secret society of assassins. The group’s leader, Sloan (Morgan Freeman), formally introduces Gibson to Fox (Angelina Jolie), the woman from the night before, and invites him to follow in his father’s footsteps as an assassin. Sloan tests Gibson by making him shoot the wings off a fly. When Gibson refuses, a gun is put to his head, triggering a panic attack. Gibson somehow manages to shoot the wings off several flies. Sloan says that he was able to do that because his heart beats 400 times a second when he’s stressed. When Sloan asks him whether he want to know how to control it, he runs away in fear. Gibson wakes up the next day hoping everything was a dream, but discovers his father’s gun (which he stashes in the toilet tank), and that he has $3.6 million in his bank account. At work, Gibson tells off his boss, bashes his duplicitous friend with a computer keyboard (forming the words "FUCK YOU" with the f, u, c, k, y, o letters and a tooth that pops out of his friend’s mouth), and storms out. Gibson then sees pictures of himself and Fox on the front page of several newspapers as wanted fugitives for the pharmacy shooting. Then he notices Fox, who has been waiting outside, and she gives him a ride back to the Fraternity headquarters – an unassuming textile mill.

Sometime later when his training is complete, Gibson is given orders to kill people from the Loom of Fate, a loom that gives the names of the targets through a binary code hidden in weaving errors of the fabric. While on his first assignment, Gibson has second thoughts and hesitates killing his target. In a flashback we learn that he told Fox it isn’t right to kill people without knowing anything about them or why they deserve to die. Fox then relates a childhood story, about a judge handling a sensitive case, and the defendant had ordered him assassinated. A hired killer held the young girl at knifepoint as they waited for her father to return home. The killer then lit the father on fire as the young girl watched, and then branded his initials into her neck. Fox explained that the man who killed the judge had been targeted by the Fraternity several weeks prior to the events of the story, but their assassin had failed to carry out his duty. Fox then tells Gibson The Fraternity’s idea, "Kill one and maybe save thousands". As she prepares to leave, he notices initials branded on her neck and realizes the story was about her. Back to present we see Gibson bends a bullet trajectory to kill the target a moment after this recollection.

Whenever Sloan orders Gibson to kill a person, Gibson would ask whether the target is Cross as he cannot wait to have revenge. At one time, Sloan grants his wish as the next target is Cross. Fox feels that it is too early but Sloan gives her another order where the target is Gibson.

Gibson and Fox travel to the Fraternity’s original base of operations in Europe. The two easily capture Pekwarsky and force him to take them to Cross. The meeting leads to a confrontation between Gibson and Cross on a moving train. Fox steals a car and crashes it into the train, eventually causing the train to derail when it reaches a bridge over a deep ravine (killing all innocent passengers). Gibson is about to fall into the ravine before Cross catches his hand, saving his life. Gibson unhesitatingly shoots him. Before Cross dies, he tells Gibson that he is his real father and that the Fraternity had been lying to him. Fox confirms the truth and explains that Gibson was recruited because he was the only person that Cross wouldn’t kill. Fox then tells Gibson about the kill order on him and raises her weapon to shoot him. Gibson, however, shoots the glass underneath him and plunges into the river below.

Gibson awakes in an apartment across the street from his former apartment. He finds Pekwarsky there. Upon inspecting the apartment, he discovers it belonged to his father, who had been monitoring him his whole life. Pekwarsky hands Gibson a loom weaving and tells him to decode it. Gibson is shocked to discover Sloan’s name in the weaving. Pekwarsky explains that after Sloan discovered that he was the next target stated by the Loom of Fate, he started manufacturing his own targets and after discovering this Cross goes rogue and Sloan turns the Fraternity against him. Since then Sloan has used false kill orders to direct the Fraternity as mere contract killers. Gibson realizes that Cross had never actually tried to kill him in their previous confrontations; he had been assassinating Fraternity members to keep them away from Gibson. Pekwarsky departs after giving Gibson plane tickets, stating that his father wished him a life free of violence. While exploring the apartment further, Gibson discovers a secret room containing all of his father’s weapons and maps. He even finds a supply of the Exterminator’s mini-bombs, realizing that the Exterminator had been working with his father. Gibson then devises a plan to take out Sloan and the Fraternity. Upon entering Sloan’s office, he finds himself surrounded by Fox and her fellow master assassins. Gibson tells them that Sloan is killing for profit by providing his killers with fraudulent kill orders. He then attempts to kill Sloan, but is disarmed by Fox.

Fox asks Sloan if this is true. Sloan then reveals that all of their names had come up in the weaving, and that he had merely acted to protect them. He then goes on to explain that if they truly believe in the code then they should take their lives right where they stand. Otherwise, they should kill Gibson. The other assassins decide to kill Gibson, but Fox turns on her fellow assassins. She "curves" a bullet to kill the assassins who had been standing in a circle, then throws her gun to Gibson before stepping back into the bullet. Sloan escapes. Gibson, penniless once more, does not know what to do with himself. While Gibson provides a voice-over, the audience sees a young man sitting in front of a computer in a cubicle much like Gibson did at the beginning of the film. The man types the name "Wesley Gibson" into Google and searches for it but does not have any results, as in the beginning of the film. Sloan appears and points a gun at the man’s head. At that moment, the man turns around and is revealed to be a decoy and looks down. Sloan also looks down and realizes he is standing on a marked spot. He then looks up and says, "Oh, fuck", before Gibson, who is actually miles away, shoots him in the head from the comfort of his own apartment, from the same window his father killed Mr. X at the beginning of the movie. It is also shown that the same bullet passed through an energy drink his former best friend was holding as his unfaithful girlfriend looks on in shock, and passed through a donut his former boss was about to eat mere moments before it killed Sloan.

The movie ends with Gibson breaking the fourth wall, addressing the audience and giving an overview of his last six weeks as an assassin saying, "This is me taking back control of my life. What the fuck have you done lately?"

 

FullCast & Crew

Produced By:

  • Gary Barber known as executive producer
  • Roger Birnbaum known as executive producer
  • Blair Breard known as line producer: New York (as M. Blair Breard)
  • Chris Carlisle known as co-producer
  • Sally French known as co-producer
  • J.G. Jones known as co-producer
  • Jared LeBoff known as co-producer
  • Jim Lemley known as producer
  • Mark Millar known as co-producer
  • David Minkowski known as co-producer
  • Jason Netter known as producer
  • Marc Platt known as producer
  • Adam Siegel known as executive producer
  • Marc Silvestri known as executive producer
  • Iain Smith known as producer
  • Matthew Stillman known as co-producer

FullCast & Crew:

  • James McAvoy known as Wesley
  • Morgan Freeman known as Sloan
  • Angelina Jolie known as Fox
  • Terence Stamp known as Pekwarsky
  • Thomas Kretschmann known as Cross
  • Common known as The Gunsmith
  • Kristen Hager known as Cathy
  • Marc Warren known as The Repairman
  • David O'Hara known as Mr. X (as David Patrick O'Hara)
  • Konstantin Khabenskiy known as The Exterminator (as Konstantin Khabensky)
  • Dato Bakhtadze known as The Butcher
  • Chris Pratt known as Barry
  • Lorna Scott known as Janice
  • Sophiya Haque known as Puja
  • Brian Caspe known as The Pharmacist
  • Mark O'Neal known as Co-Worker
  • Bridget McManus known as Check-Out Girl
  • Bob Ari known as Man in the Limo (uncredited)
  • Daniel Boughton known as Mini-Mart Customer / Pedestrian (uncredited)
  • Brad Calcaterra known as Assassin Max Petridge (uncredited)
  • Julia Copeland known as Driver (uncredited)
  • Claudia Di Biccari known as Pedestrian (uncredited)
  • Sharlene Grover known as Hotel Guest (uncredited)
  • Michael Jeremiah known as Weaver (uncredited)
  • John Joseph MacDonald known as Westley's Decoy (uncredited)
  • Joseph Mazurk known as Pedestrian Near Wesley's Apartment (uncredited)
  • Tyson Minnick known as Man on Sidewalk (uncredited)
  • Larry Nazimek known as Driver (uncredited)
  • Eliyas Qureshi known as Weaver Assassin (uncredited)
  • Amit Shah known as Hotel Guest (uncredited)
  • Scarlett Sperduto known as Young Fox (uncredited)
  • Mike Whyte known as Businessman (uncredited)
  • Bernadett Belinda York known as Girl on Sidewalk (uncredited)
  • George Zerante known as Driver (uncredited)
  • Joshua Zumhagen known as Pedestrian (uncredited)

..

 

Supporting Department

Makeup Department:
  • Nikina Abramov known as prosthetics assistant
  • Deena Adair known as hairdresser: Mr. Freeman
  • Maxim Bulanov known as prosthetics assistant
  • Karen Cohen known as hair stylist: second unit
  • Karen Cohen known as makeup artist: second unit
  • Julie Dartnell known as hair stylist
  • Julie Dartnell known as makeup artist
  • Linda DeVetta known as makeup artist: Ms. Jolie (as Linda De Vetta)
  • Nikolay Goldov known as prosthetics assistant
  • Peter Gorshenin known as special makeup effects artist
  • Nancy Hancock known as makeup artist: Mr. Freeman (as Nancy Worthen-Hancock)
  • Frances Hannon known as hair designer
  • Frances Hannon known as makeup designer
  • Carmel Jackson known as hair stylist
  • Carmel Jackson known as makeup artist
  • Colin Jamison known as hairdresser: Ms. Jolie
  • Valeria Komardina known as prosthetics assistant
  • Konstantin Kultashov known as prosthetics assistant
  • Kristyan Mallett known as prosthetic technician: UK
  • Dominic Mango known as key hair stylist: Chicago
  • Tatyana Melkomova known as prosthetics assistant (as Tatiana Melkomova)
  • Tony Mirante known as hair stylist: Chicago (as Anthony Mirante)
  • Suzi Ostos known as key makeup artist: Chicago
  • Kiril Potapov known as prosthetics assistant
  • Gemma Richards known as hair stylist
  • Gemma Richards known as makeup artist
  • Adéla Robová known as hair stylist
  • Adéla Robová known as makeup artist
  • Ailie Smith known as hair stylist: second unit
  • Ailie Smith known as makeup artist: second unit
  • Rene Stejskal known as prosthetics supervisor
  • Rene Stejskal known as special makeup effects artist
  • Rene Stejskal known as special makeup effects designer
  • Telona Wilson known as makeup artist: Chicago

Art Department:

  • Martin Asbury known as storyboard artist
  • Ray Barrett known as construction manager
  • Marketa Bockova known as props coordinator
  • Tessa Brophy known as art department coordinator: NY unit
  • Tom Castronovo known as art department assistant
  • David J. Chamerski known as property master
  • Kimberly Clancy known as buyer
  • Temple Clark known as concept illustrator
  • Chris Cleek known as assistant art director
  • Frank Coronado known as storyboard artist
  • Elan Dassani known as computer graphic designer
  • Dean DeMatteis known as graphic designer: Chicago
  • Jack Dyer known as construction buyer
  • Tyler Gooden known as illustrator
  • Kevin Harris known as assistant construction manager
  • Toby Hawkes known as supervising propmaker
  • Bernie Hearn known as chargehand stand-by prop
  • Stuart Heath known as prop maker
  • Roman Illovsky known as stand-by art director
  • Lisa Kent known as assistant set decorator
  • Vladimir Kesl known as screen graphics designer
  • Alice Kheilova known as set dec co-ordinator
  • Martin Kingsley known as assistant property master
  • Laurel Kolsby known as graphic designer: New York
  • Katerina Koutská known as set designer
  • Beth Kushnick known as set decorator: New York
  • Nathan Mack known as carpenter
  • Stephen McGregor known as chargehand carpenter
  • James McKeown known as propmaker
  • Silvija L. Moess known as scenic stand-by
  • Matthew J. Norskog known as set dresser
  • Troy Osman known as construction foreman
  • Tyler Osman known as construction coordinator
  • Eric Pastore known as props: New York
  • Petra Ratner known as art department coordinator (as Petra Meisnerova)
  • Diane Rich known as scenic artist foreman
  • Eric Rosenberg known as graphic designer
  • Steven M. Saylor known as lead set designer
  • Steven M. Saylor known as virtual set designer
  • Jan Soufek known as art director: second unit
  • Stanislav Suva known as scenic painter
  • Larry Szymanowski known as on-set scenic artist
  • Pavel Tatar known as set designer
  • Ty Teiger known as property master
  • Robert Topol known as master scenic artist
  • Sara Emily Tremblay known as art department intern
  • Scott Troha known as leadman: Chicago
  • M. Tony Trotta known as camera scenic artist
  • Kurt Van Der Basch known as storyboard artist
  • Peter Watson known as chargehand dressing props
  • Cliff Zimowski known as art department coordinator: Chicago
  • Josh Zylstra known as buyer: Chicago
  • Kenneth Brzozowski known as key carpenter: New York (uncredited)
  • John Davis known as illustrator (part one) (uncredited)
  • Thomas Jones known as weapons mould maker (uncredited)
  • Brick Mason known as storyboard artist (uncredited)
  • Ken Nelson known as construction coordinator (uncredited)
  • Ashanti Ngozi known as art department production assistant: New York (uncredited)
  • Pamela Nullet known as shop production assistant (uncredited)
  • Barbara Sandberg known as graphic designer: Prague (uncredited)

..

 

Company

Production Companies:

  • Universal Pictures (presents)
  • Spyglass Entertainment (presents)
  • Relativity Media (in association with)
  • Marc Platt Productions
  • Kickstart Productions
  • Top Cow Productions (in association with) (as Top Cow)
  • Ringerike Zweite Filmproduktion (as Ringerike Luftfahrtbeteiligungs) (in association with)
  • Bazelevs Production

Other Companies:

  • 20th Century Fox Studios  score recorded at (as 20th Century Fox)
  • Audiolink Radio Communications  walkie talkies
  • Barrandov Studios  studio facilities provided by
  • Behind the Scenes  shipping by
  • BridgeStreet Worldwide  production housing
  • CE VideoAssist Rental  VideoAssist equipment provided by
  • Cablecam International  special camera systems
  • Chapman/Leonard Studio Equipment  camera dollies
  • Chapman/Leonard Studio Equipment  stabilized remote camera systems
  • Corbis  stock photographs courtesy of
  • Crestock.com  stock photographs courtesy of
  • David Haddad  transportation equipment
  • EFilm  digital intermediate
  • EXTRAfilms S.r.o.  extras casting
  • Fletcher Chicago  additional camera equipment
  • Getty Images  stock photographs courtesy of
  • Haddad's  transportation equipment
  • Helicopter Film Services  aerial filming and equipment
  • Jupiterimages  stock photographs courtesy of
  • Klass Entertainment  product placement
  • Lakeshore Records  soundtrack
  • Macwell  computer services provided by
  • Ocean Way Studios  score mixed at (as Ocean Way Stage M)
  • Old School Cameras  camera equipment provided by
  • Pacific Title  titles and opticals
  • Packair Airfreight  international logistics
  • Panalux  film lighting
  • Panavision  camera and grip equipment with cranes serviced by
  • Pictorvision  aerial camera system
  • Prague Studios  sound stages
  • Red Digital Cinema  camera equipment provided by
  • Rockbottom Rentals  cell phone rentals
  • Soundelux  post-production sound services
  • Stillking Films  production services: Czech Republic
  • Synxspeed  sound post-production (foreign dub)
  • Synxspeed  sound re-recording (foreign dub)
  • Tenon Media  UK audit and accountancy services
  • Translux  facilities and trucks
  • Universal Studios Sound Facilities  post-production sound (as Universal Studios Sound)
  • Universal Studios Sound Facilities  re-recording services provided by (as Universal Studios Sound)
  • iStockPhoto.com  stock photographs courtesy of

Distributors:

  • Universal Pictures (2008) (USA) (theatrical)
  • Bontonfilm (2008) (Czech Republic) (theatrical)
  • Paramount Pictures (2008) (France) (theatrical)
  • Tatrafilm (2008) (Slovakia) (theatrical)
  • Toho-Towa (2008) (Japan) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2008) (Argentina) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2008) (Greece) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2008) (Denmark) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2008) (Norway) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2008) (Sweden) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2008) (Singapore) (theatrical)
  • Universal Pictures International (UPI) (2008) (Switzerland) (theatrical)
  • Universal Pictures International (UPI) (2008) (Germany) (theatrical)
  • Universal Pictures International (UPI) (2008) (Netherlands) (theatrical)
  • Universal Pictures International (UPI) (2008) (Russia) (theatrical)
  • Argentina Video Home (2009) (Argentina) (DVD)
  • Argentina Video Home (2009) (Argentina) (DVD) (Blu-ray)
  • Home Box Office (HBO) (2009) (USA) (TV)
  • Sony Pictures Home Entertainment (2009) (Greece) (DVD)
  • Universal Pictures Benelux (2009) (Netherlands) (DVD)
  • Universal Pictures Benelux (2009) (Netherlands) (DVD) (Blu-ray)
  • Universal Studios Home Entertainment (2008) (USA) (DVD)
  • Universal Studios Home Entertainment (2008) (USA) (DVD) (Blu-ray)

..

 

Other Stuff

Special Effects:

  • Bazelevs Production (visual effects) (as Bazelevs)
  • Framestore CFC (visual effects)
  • Hammerhead Productions (visual effects)
  • Hydraulx (visual effects) (as [hy*drau''lx])
  • Hatch Production (visual effects)
  • Pacific Title and Art Studio (visual effects)

Visual Effects by:

  • Nikita Abramov known as computer graphics artist: Bazelevs
  • Gennady Afonin known as computer graphics artist: Bazelevs
  • Ben Aickin known as digital compositor
  • Maksim Aksenov known as rendering & texturing artist: Bazelevs
  • Maxim Alaev known as compositor: Bazelevs
  • Denis Alymov known as animation supervisor: Bazelevs
  • Denis Alymov known as animation supervisor: Ulitka
  • Kris Anderson known as digital compositor
  • Georgy Arevshatov known as shading artist: Bazelevs
  • Georgy Arevshatov known as shading, texturing, lighting: Ulitka
  • Karen Asatryan known as character animator: Bazelevs
  • Carol Ashley known as digital compositor: Hammerhead Productions
  • Georgiy Asriyants known as digital artist: Bazelevs
  • David Aulds known as digital compositor
  • Jarrod Avalos known as matchmove artist
  • Ian Backer known as visual effects production assistant: Hammerhead Productions
  • Cheryl Bainum known as executive producer: HATCH
  • Sergey Bajanov known as digital artist: Bazelevs
  • Jason Baker known as technical director: Framestore CFC
  • Andrey Bakulin known as computer graphics artist: Bazelevs
  • Manjusha Balachandran known as render wrangler/render support
  • Ido Banai known as flame artist: Hydraulx
  • Craig Bardsley known as animator: Framestore CFC
  • Evgeny Barulin known as senior visual effects supervisor: Bazelevs
  • Matt Bell known as rigger: Framestore CFC
  • Richard A.M. Bell known as technical director: Framestore CFC (as Richard Bell)
  • Rodrigo Bernardo known as systems engineer
  • John Berri known as visual effects editor
  • Pavel Bezborodov known as visual effects supervisor: Bazelevs
  • Thomas Biller known as lighting technical director: Framestore-CFC
  • Ales Blabolil known as visual effects
  • Olga Blagova known as visual effects coordinator: Bazelevs
  • Zachary Bloom known as scanning and recording: Framestore CFC
  • Turea Blyth known as visual effects editorial: Framestore
  • Roman Bobrov known as digital artist: Bazelevs
  • Roman Bobrov known as digital artist: Main Road Post
  • Egor Borisko known as digital effects artist: Bazelevs
  • Peter Bowmar known as effects technical director
  • William Brand known as visual effects artist
  • Erik Bruhwiler known as compositing coordinator: Hydraulx
  • Lukasz Bukowiecki known as render support
  • Ross Burgess known as animator: Framestore CFC
  • Paul Burke known as scanning and recording: Framestore
  • Marina Burkova known as visual effects coordinator: Bazelevs
  • Marco Capparelli known as animator
  • Denis Cebulkin known as compositor: Bazelevs
  • Gregory Chalenko known as lead compositor
  • Gregory Chalenko known as sequence supervisor
  • Je-Ren Chen known as effects artist
  • Greg Cheng known as digital effects artist
  • Eugene Chmil known as visual effects producer: Bazelevs
  • Daniel Chuba known as executive producer: Hammerhead Productions (as Dan Chuba)
  • Patrick Clancey known as digital opticals (as Pat Clancey)
  • Andrew M. Collins known as matchmove artist
  • Cameron Coombs known as digital compositor: Hydraulx
  • Chase Cooper known as character technical director
  • Joshua Cordes known as animation supervisor: Hydraulx
  • Aliza Corson Chameides known as digital compositor: Hammerhead Productions
  • Graham Cristie known as lighting technical director: Framestore-CFC
  • Nick D'Aguiar known as digital artist
  • Thomas Dadras known as co-visual effects supervisor: Hammerhead Productions
  • Dominic Daigle known as senior digital artist: HATCH
  • Alexandra Daunt Watney known as visual effects coordinator: Framestore CFC
  • Arkadiy Demchenko known as digital artist
  • Max Dennison known as matte artist: Matte Painting UK Ltd
  • Andrey Deych known as sequence supervisor: Bazelevs
  • Andrey Deych known as sequence supervisor: Ulitka
  • Michael Dillon known as digital intermediate assistant producer
  • Jamie Dixon known as visual effects supervisor: Hammerhead Productions
  • Crystal Dowd known as executive visual effects producer: Pacific Title and Art Studio
  • Roman Draygalin known as digital artist: Bazelevs
  • Sergey Drozhzhin known as digital artist: Bazelevs
  • Luke Drummond known as compositor: Framestore CFC
  • Gus Duron known as digital opticals editor
  • Yaroslav Dyachenko known as digital compositor
  • Sam Edwards known as digital compositor
  • Eric Ehemann known as animator
  • Mohsen Eletreby known as visual effects editor: Hydraulx
  • Andrey Emelyanov known as sequence supervisor: Bazelevs
  • Selcuk Ergen known as effects artist: Framestore CFC
  • Selcuk Ergen known as visual effects technical director: Framestore-CFC
  • Stanislav Ermakov known as digital artist: Bazelevs
  • Leonid Ermoshin known as compositor: Bazelevs
  • Stefen Fangmeier known as visual effects supervisor
  • Jon Farhat known as visual effects supervisor
  • Roman Fedotov known as research and development: Bazelevs
  • Deak Ferrand known as concept artist/matte painter: prologue, HATCH
  • Maria Filatova known as compositor: Bazelevs
  • Jonathan Flack known as digital artist
  • Jonathan Flack known as visual effects: Hammerhead Productions
  • Airat Gabbasov known as modeling & texturing artist: Bazelevs
  • Renat Gabdrakhmanov known as lead compositor: Bazelevs
  • Renat Gabdrakhmanov known as senior digital compositor: Ulitka
  • Robb Gardner known as lighting technical director: Framestore-CFC
  • Sotiris Georghiou known as digital effects artist (as Sotos Georghiou)
  • Lynn M. Gephart known as visual effects producer: Hammerhead
  • Maria Giannakouros known as visual effects technical director: Framestore CFC
  • Matthew Gilson known as digital matte painter: Hydraulx
  • Evgeniy Gittsigrat known as lighting artist: Bazelevs
  • Viktor Glukhushin known as character animator: Bazelevs
  • Gilbert Gonzales known as digital compositor
  • Tyler Gooden known as data wrangler
  • Dave Gordon known as digital artist: Hammerhead Productions
  • Aleksandr Gorokhov known as visual effects producer: Bazelevs (as Alexandr Gorokhov)
  • Jon Grinberg known as visual effects editor
  • Dean Grubb known as effects artist
  • Victoria Habarova known as visual effects coordinator: Bazelevs
  • Timur Hairulin known as computer graphics supervisor: Bazelevs
  • Brian Hanable known as digital effects compositor: Pacific Title
  • Emile Hardy known as digital matte painter: Framestore CFC
  • Daniel Harkness known as prep artist
  • Karsten Hecker known as film mastering engineer: Framestore CFC
  • Eoin Hegan known as visual effects production assistant
  • Deborah Hiner known as rotoscope artist: Hammerhead Productions
  • Mark Hodgkins known as senior effects artist: Framestore
  • Charles Howell known as visual effects producer: Framestore CFC
  • Julia Huene known as visual effects coordinator: Bazelevs
  • Matt Hughes known as modelling supervisor: Framestore CFC (as Matthew Hughes)
  • Laurent Hugueniot known as CG supervisor
  • Justin Jones known as compositing supervisor: Hammerhead Productions
  • Olivier Junquet known as senior effects technical director
  • Alexey Kalinchikov known as lead 3D artist: Bazelevs
  • Georg Kaltenbrunner known as digital effects artist
  • Maria Karneeva known as visual effects producer: Bazelevs
  • Elena Karpunkina known as compositor: Bazelevs
  • Vladimir Kasian known as digital compositor
  • Vladimir Kasian known as visual effects artist
  • Kelly Rae Kenan known as visual effects coordinator: Hammerhead Productions (as Kelly Kenan)
  • Michael Kennedy known as digital compositor: Hammerhead Productions
  • Vladimir Kesl known as computer graphics playback
  • Timur Khairulin known as CG supervisor: Main Road Post
  • Steven Anthony Khoury known as lighting technical director
  • Andy Kind known as lead artist
  • Andy Kind known as senior technical director: Framestore CFC
  • Max Kirienko known as senior visual effects supervisor: Bazelevs (as Maxim Kirienko)
  • Vadim Kirillin known as digital artist: Bazelevs
  • Dmitriy Kiselev known as senior visual effects supervisor: Bazelevs (as Dmitri Kiselev)
  • Sergey Klimov known as computer graphics artist: Bazelevs
  • Dmitry Korshunov known as compositor: Bazelevs
  • Dmitry Korshunov known as computer graphics artist
  • Dmitry Koryanov known as visual effects coordinator: Bazelevs
  • Sergey Kosarev known as computer graphics artist: Bazelevs
  • Maria Kosheleva known as digital compositor
  • Sergey Krivopliasov known as character modeling & texturing artist: Bazelevs
  • Daniel Kruse known as digital lighter: Hydraulx
  • Alexey Kublitsky known as visual effects executive producer: Bazelevs
  • Oleksandr Kucherov known as visual effects supervisor: Bazelevs
  • Steve Kullback known as visual effects producer
  • Pavan Kumar known as digital artist
  • Aleksandr Kushulya known as senior visual effects supervisor: Bazelevs
  • Tatyana Kuznetsova known as character animator: Bazelevs
  • Tatyana Kuznetsova known as character animator: Ulitka
  • Evgeniy Kyaburu known as digital artist: Bazelevs
  • Evgeniy Kyaburu known as digital artist: Main Road Post
  • Enrico Lambiase known as roto artist: Framestore CFC
  • Cam Langs known as senior technical director: Framestore CFC
  • Evgeniya Lavrenko known as visual effects coordinator: Bazelevs
  • Ilya Lebedev known as visual effects editor
  • Pavel Ledin known as lighting technical director
  • Veronika Lerchová known as digital dailies: UPP
  • Veronika Lerchová known as scanning coordinator: UPP
  • Didier Levy known as senior lighter
  • Dmitry Loktev known as character animator: Bazelevs
  • Dmitry Loktev known as texturing artist: Bazelevs
  • Elena Lotanova known as visual effects coordinator: Bazelevs (as Irina Lobanova)
  • Boris Lutsyuk known as visual effects compositor
  • Boris Lutsyuk known as visual effects supervisor
  • Irina Luzgina known as visual effects coordinator: Bazelevs
  • Craig Lyn known as visual effects supervisor
  • Mikhail Lyossin known as systems support: Main Road Post
  • Andreas Maaninka known as digital artist: Framestore-CFC
  • Hugh Macdonald known as digital compositor
  • Martin Macrae known as digital environment supervisor: Framestore
  • Matt Magnolia known as visual effects post coordinator: Universal (as Matthew Magnolia)
  • Julia Makarchenko known as visual effects coordinator: Bazelevs
  • Andrey Maksimov known as computer graphics artist: Bazelevs
  • Julian Mann known as digital effects artist
  • Paul Maples known as cablecam operator
  • Rebecca Marie known as executive producer: Hammerhead Productions
  • Luke Massingberd known as rotoscope artist
  • Richard Matsushita known as digital artist: Hammerhead Production
  • Mamie McCall known as digital compositor: Hammerhead Productions
  • Oliver McCluskey known as technical director
  • Evgeniy Melkov known as character rigging technical director: Bazelevs
  • Evgeniy Melkov known as character set up: Ulitka
  • Daniel Mellitz known as digital compositor
  • Joel Merritt known as digital compositor: Hammerhead Productions
  • Christophe Meslin known as head of systems
  • Andrey Mesnyankin known as senior visual effects supervisor: Bazelevs
  • Zuzana Mesticová known as visual effects coordinator
  • Michael Meyers known as modeler
  • Jon Miller known as matchmove supervisor: Escape Studios
  • Brad Minnich known as assistant visual effects editor
  • Brad Minnich known as visual effects assistant editor
  • Ekaterina Mironova known as digital artist: Bazelevs
  • Evgeniy Mischenko known as character animator: Bazelevs
  • Larisa Misyukova known as digital compositor
  • Maria Mitina known as compositor: Bazelevs
  • Fatima Mojaddidy known as system administrator: Hammerhead Productions
  • Dele Momoh known as technical director: Framestore-CFC
  • Ray Moody known as clapper loader: VFX Unit
  • Paolo Moscatelli known as digital artist: Hammerhead Productions
  • Oleksii Moskalenko known as visual effects supervisor: Bazelevs
  • Josh Mossotti known as visual effects
  • Roza Mukhamedova known as digital compositor: Bazelevs (as Rose Muhamedova)
  • Ryan Mullany known as digital artist
  • Hiroaki Muramoto known as environment effects
  • Hiroaki Muramoto known as technical director: Framestore CFC
  • Sergey Muraviev known as visual effects supervisor: Bazelevs
  • Paul Murphy known as texture artist: Framestore-CFC
  • Ephraim Mwakandu known as compositor: Framestore CFC
  • Patrick Nagle known as compositor
  • Bruce Nelson known as digital compositor: Framestore CFC
  • Chun Seong Ng known as modeler: Hydraulx
  • Donal Nolan known as senior compositor
  • Olga Novikova known as character animator: Bazelevs
  • Co'nchur O'Meara known as technical director: Framestore CFC
  • Grigory Obydenov known as lead compositor: Bazelevs
  • Victor Ochirov known as lead digital artist: Bazelevs
  • Vyacheslav Onipko known as compositor: Bazelevs (as Viatcheslav Onipko)
  • Sam Osborne known as digital artist
  • Aleksey Osipenkov known as digital compositor
  • Dimitry Oskin known as digital artist: Bazelevs (as Dmitry Oskin)
  • Donald Pan known as digital modeller: Framestore CFC
  • Oleksandr Panaskevych known as lead effects technical director: Framestore CFC
  • Havel Parkán known as match mover
  • Mitch Paulson known as digital colorist assist
  • Alex Payman known as compositing supervisor: Framestore CFC
  • Dan Pearce known as digital compositor: Framestore CFC (as Daniel Pearce)
  • Russell Pearsall known as lead character artist
  • John Peck known as digital compositor
  • Talli Peled known as effects technical director: Framestore CFC
  • Timofey Penkov known as lead previsualization artist: Bazelevs
  • Pavel Perepyolkin known as senior visual effects supervisor: Bazelevs (as Pavel Perepelkin)
  • Elena Pestrikova known as lead compositor: Bazelevs
  • Angela Petrosyan known as visual effects producer: Ulitka
  • Aleksei Petrov known as digital artist: Bazelevs (as Alexey Petrov)
  • Ryan Pilcher known as matchmove artist
  • Pauline Piper known as visual effects coordinator
  • Caroline Pires known as digital paint and roto artist
  • Ian Plumb known as digital compositor
  • Mike Pope known as digital compositor
  • Travis Porter known as digital compositor
  • Tim Potter known as matchmover
  • Aleksandr Prigorniy known as digital compositor
  • Alexander Progorny known as digital artist: Bazelevs
  • Aled Prosser known as digital compositor
  • Cristina Puente known as digital compositor: Framestore
  • Alexander Pustika known as computer graphics artist: Bazelevs
  • Scott Rader known as senior inferno artist: Hydraulx
  • Lee Rankin known as scanning and recording: Framestore CFC
  • Ryan Reeb known as digital artist
  • James William Roberts known as digital paint and rotoscope artist
  • Dave Robinson known as systems engineer
  • Dmitry Robustov known as senior software developer: Ulitka
  • Darren Rodriguez known as animator
  • Karl Rogovin known as 3D coordinator: Hydraulx
  • Karl Rogovin known as digital artist: Hydraulx
  • Alex Rothwell known as senior technical director: Framestore CFC
  • Andrew Rowan-Robinson known as pipeline technical director: Framestore CFC
  • Jackie Rowson known as compositor: Framestore CFC (as Jacqueline Rowson)
  • Jackie Rowson known as digital effects artist
  • Yuri Rudakoff known as digital effects artist: Bazelevs
  • Yuriy Rudakov known as digital effects artist: Ulitka
  • Leigh Russell known as matchmove artist
  • Igor Samorodov known as compositor: Bazelevs
  • Steven J. Scott known as supervising digital colorist: EFILM
  • Vit Sedlacek known as digital intermediate assistant
  • Dennis Sedov known as visual effects
  • Joseph Severn known as 3D surveyor
  • Joel Sevilla known as animator
  • Amir Shachar known as senior look development technical director: Framestore CFC
  • Denys Shchukin known as visual effects artist
  • Dmitry Shekhavtsov known as visual effects artist
  • Dmitri Shirokov known as lead compositor: Bazelevs (as Dmitry Shirokov)
  • Dmitry Shumilin known as software developer & fx artist
  • Dmitry Shumkin known as compositor: Bazelevs
  • Dmitry Shumkin known as digital compositor: Ulitka
  • Aleksandr Sknarin known as digital artist: Bazelevs
  • Dmitry Slepichev known as research and development: Bazelevs
  • David Sliviak known as visual effects artist
  • Anthony Smith known as senior compositor
  • Vladimir Sofronov known as digital compositor: Ulitka
  • Vladimir Sofronov known as senior compositor: Bazelevs
  • Max Solomon known as animation supervisor: Framestore CFC (as Max Soloman)
  • Jean-David Solon known as texture artist: Framestore CFC
  • Nic Spier known as digital effects artist
  • Andrey Stremousov known as lead digital artist: Bazelevs
  • Andrey Stremousov known as lead digital artist: Main Road Post
  • David Swift known as digital matte painter: Framestore CFC
  • Vladimir Tkachenko known as 3D artist: Bazelevs
  • Vladimir Tkachenko known as character technical director: Bazelevs
  • Dmitriy Tokoyakov known as visual effects supervisor: Bazelevs
  • Vitaliy Treboganov known as digital artist: Bazelevs (as Vitaly Treboganov)
  • Vitaliy Treboganov known as digital compositor
  • Andrey Turyanskiy known as compositor: Bazelevs
  • Kristi Valk known as digital matte painter
  • Dimitry Vasiliev known as compositor: Bazelevs (as Dmitry Vasilyev)
  • Vsevolod Verbitsky known as digital artist: Bazelevs
  • Vsevolod Verbitsky known as modeling artist: Ulitka
  • Giuliano Dionisio Vigano' known as digital compositor
  • Igor Vlasov known as computer graphics artist: Bazelevs
  • Artem Voinskiy known as digital artist: Bazelevs
  • Artem Voinskiy known as visual effects artist: Ulitka
  • Ilya Vostrov known as modeling artist: Bazelevs
  • Maggie Walby known as digital paint & roto artist: Framestore CFC
  • Tara Walker known as compositor
  • Ian Ward known as visual effects
  • Kyle Ware known as visual effects coordinator: Hydraulx
  • Andrew C. Whitelaw known as digital artist: HATCH
  • Stephen Willey known as senior systems engineer
  • C. Jerome Williams known as digital artist
  • Jason Williams known as technical director: Framestore CFC (as Jason Hannen-Williams)
  • Jason Williams known as visual effects artist
  • Toby Winder known as matchmover
  • Manny Wong known as digital artist: Hammerhead Productions
  • Konstantin Yablonskiy known as digital matte painter: Bazelevs (as Konstantin Yablonsky)
  • Juliette Yager known as visual effects producer
  • Arman Yahin known as senior visual effects supervisor: Bazelevs
  • Arman Yahin known as visual effects supervisor: Main Road Post
  • Yoshiya Yamada known as visual effects
  • Sergei Zadorozhny known as digital artist: Bazelevs
  • Apollinary Zakharov known as 3D artist: Bazelevs
  • Luca Zappala known as senior technical director: Framestore
  • Zaurbek Zassev known as visual effects coordinator: Bazelevs
  • Alexey Zaytsev known as digital artist: Bazelevs (as Alexey Zaitsev)
  • Alexey Zaytsev known as digital artist: Main Road Post
  • Matthias Zeller known as senior character technical director
  • Valery Zraghevsky known as digital artist
  • Valery Zraghevsky known as digital matte painter: Bazelevs (as Valeriy Zragevski)
  • Ilona Blyth known as visual effects editor: Framestore (uncredited)
  • Elika Burns known as roto/paint supervisor: CIS Hollywood (uncredited)
  • David Emeny known as roto artist: Escape Studios (uncredited)
  • Marc Hankel known as digital paint & roto artist: Framestore CFC (uncredited)
  • Leo Hills known as render support: Framestore CFC (uncredited)
  • Duncan Lees known as head of 3D services: Plowman Craven and Associates (uncredited)
  • Peter Logarusic known as paint & roto artist: Framestore CFC (uncredited)
  • Thomas Mathai known as data manager (uncredited)
  • Mark Pinheiro known as visual consultant (uncredited)
  • Mark Pinheiro known as visual consultant: Escape Studios (uncredited)
  • Mikhail Pustovalov known as matchmover: main road post (uncredited )
  • Alexander Sokolov known as pre-visualization (uncredited)

Release Date:

  • UK 12 June 2008 (London) (premiere)
  • USA 19 June 2008 (Los Angeles Film Festival)
  • Iceland 25 June 2008
  • UK 25 June 2008
  • Croatia 26 June 2008
  • Czech Republic 26 June 2008
  • Hungary 26 June 2008
  • Kazakhstan 26 June 2008
  • Russia 26 June 2008
  • Singapore 26 June 2008
  • Slovakia 26 June 2008
  • Slovenia 26 June 2008
  • South Korea 26 June 2008
  • Thailand 26 June 2008
  • Ukraine 26 June 2008
  • Bulgaria 27 June 2008
  • Canada 27 June 2008
  • Estonia 27 June 2008
  • Finland 27 June 2008
  • Hong Kong 27 June 2008
  • Ireland 27 June 2008
  • Lithuania 27 June 2008
  • Philippines 27 June 2008
  • Poland 27 June 2008
  • Romania 27 June 2008
  • Turkey 27 June 2008
  • USA 27 June 2008
  • Italy 2 July 2008
  • Indonesia 9 July 2008
  • Israel 10 July 2008
  • Portugal 10 July 2008
  • Belgium 16 July 2008
  • Egypt 16 July 2008
  • France 16 July 2008
  • Switzerland 16 July 2008 (French speaking region)
  • Kuwait 17 July 2008
  • Taiwan 23 July 2008
  • India 25 July 2008
  • Pakistan 25 July 2008
  • Australia 31 July 2008
  • Peru 31 July 2008
  • Chile 14 August 2008
  • Mexico 15 August 2008
  • Panama 15 August 2008
  • Venezuela 15 August 2008
  • Brazil 22 August 2008
  • Denmark 22 August 2008
  • Argentina 28 August 2008
  • Greece 28 August 2008
  • Germany 4 September 2008
  • Japan 4 September 2008 (Tokyo) (premiere)
  • Switzerland 4 September 2008 (German speaking region)
  • Austria 5 September 2008
  • Colombia 5 September 2008
  • Spain 10 September 2008 (Catalonia)
  • Netherlands 11 September 2008
  • Norway 12 September 2008
  • Spain 12 September 2008
  • Sweden 12 September 2008
  • Japan 13 September 2008 (limited)
  • Uruguay 19 September 2008
  • Japan 20 September 2008
  • China 9 October 2008

MPAA: Rated R for strong bloody violence throughout, pervasive language and some sexuality

..

 
 

Filmography links and data courtesy of The Internet Movie Database


Wanted (2008) Related Movie


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Posted on March 30, 2012 by Harry in Movies | Tags: , , , .

10 Comments

  1. uniiq from United States
    30 Mar 2012, 5:44 pm

    I am a huge fan of Mark Millar's Wanted. And so, when I entered thetheater with a friend on an advance screening pass (comic book storeowners are very nice people to befriend), fear gripped me. It HAS tosuck…right? It's Hollywood…and a "loose" adaptation…

    And so, once the credits rolled, and I was one of the many peoplelaughing and clapping, the fear had long passed.

    The films works. It provides the amazing opiate of style and darkhumor, and in such massive quantities that both evoke the spirit of thesource material and utterly ignore the latter 90% of the graphic novel.But that independent streak works for Wanted. You feel a sense ofamused wonder and curiosity throughout, and all the plot twists thatfollow are different enough from the source to actually hold yourattention without ever being prematurely obvious.

    James McAvoy does an excellent job, and his wry, sarcastic narrationsets the mood of the film perfectly. His evolution from pansy to Neohas a genuine and pleasantly arrogant feel to it, although thestereotypical Rocky-esquire training montage is used to speed things upa bit (what a tiresome tool). Basically, his version of a cinematic Neois both smarter, more entertaining, and more intelligent.

    Backing him up, more with sexy looks and an "I'm too cool for you;you're not Brad" attitude than anything, is Angelina Jolie. Hercharacter screams Trinity. And loudly. Regardless, watching heron-screen is a pleasure. She's terribly likable, and extremely lethalthroughout.

    Morgan Freeman's Morpheus, called Sloan here, is played well, althoughthe role is a bit beneath his skill as an actor. He makes it workthough, playing the wizened and mature helper very well. Moreimportantly, he delivers an excellent (and unexpected) line that rivalsSamuel L. Jackson's memorable expression from Snakes on a Plane. Thatalone makes any price of admission worthwhile.

    Any other character serves as nothing more than white noise, there topopulate the world rather than intrigue.

    The theme of Wanted is all about taking charge of your life and makingyour own choices, something that the very premise of the first hour ofthe film both adheres to and contradicts. Rather than analyze it here(and waste time arguing the pleasantly mad logic of a movie wherebullets bend stylishly), I'll leave that to the people who inevitablywill, assuming the bullet-fu and gore don't completely captivate them(and they should). Wanted IS violent, truly, and yet it doesn't striveto turn every frame into a gory, action-packed orgasm. The film handlesit with grace and a style I sorely wish more action movies took intoconsideration.

    As bullets curve, heads get punctured, hilarity ensues, and ratsexplode (peanut butter rocks, BTW), you'll smile besides yourself.

    This really isn't a superhero comic adaptation…it's The Matrix with agreat sense of humor.

    Enjoy it.

  2. tyler4837 from United States
    30 Mar 2012, 5:44 pm

    I was a bit apprehensive about this film from the previews andcommercials, what with the bending bullets and all, but I figured withall of the action movies trying to outdo each other…maybe there wouldbe a good story backing it. However, in the opening sequence, when aman leaps several hundred feet to slay some assassins on anotherrooftop before being aced out from miles away, I started to lose anyhopes for a good movie. Then any further hopes were dashed when it wasrevealed that a magic god loom delivers a binary code that says who isto be killed (how the frat discovered binary and secondly, that thepeople named were to be killed is beyond me, maybe god/fate/whateverwrote to them in binary on the first sweater that was and told them tokill the named ever thereafter) This whole god/fate (fate being spelledout when the explosive rat truck hit the mill door) loom thing reallyblatantly pointed out the problems with dogmatic, irrational beliefsthat can be found running rampant throughout our society; but speakingof that society, it's a shame to think that most people will be unableto find that point because it was buried behind quack gimics andspecial effects. This movie made Crank look like the Godfather. Asidefrom the absurd story backing why the frat was assassinating people,all of the stunts were merely an attempt to outdo movies like crankwith time/space bending cg that makes anyone who has any inkling ofwhat physics are want to cry. If the time-slowing gimics were cut fromthe movie, I think it would have maybe passed 30 minutes of film time.I could maybe understand the rapid heartbeat to be able to reactquicker to things, modeled after a fight or flight type of response oncrack or something, but the bullet bending thing got to be a little tooridiculous by the end where a bullet can be fired around a 20'circumference and have the same gun tossed to someone else before thebullet returns from its 360 degree trip to kill the shooter…I mean,really? I really wanted to walk out of the theater about 30 minutesinto this film. There isn't enough room in this comment box to enableme to voice the downfalls of this film. However I feel as though I mustinclude this side note on society as well. On top of whole fate andimmovable beliefs tangent from above, the fact that movies like thiscan go over well in America is a great example of how dumbed downculture is making us…Oh let's make an action movie with a loom thatdictates who should live and who should die…oh yea…and theassassins can bone physics with no rationale as to how…It truly mademe sick. "What luck for rulers that men do not think." – Adolf Hitler.It's understandable how we get leaders like George W Bush when movieslike this are not only accepted, but admired. Now if you will excuseme, I need to read my binary sweatshirt for what to eat tonight.

  3. magicmark from United States
    30 Mar 2012, 5:44 pm

    The last line of this movie asks, "What the f-word have you donelately?" If you didn't immediately answer, "I just spent two hourswatching a really dumb movie" then you must be an easily impressedvideo game enthusiast. Some interesting visuals aside, it's movies likethis that give the term "comic book movie" a bad reputation.Unexplained gravity defying flipping cars, curving bullets and ratbombs just push the envelope too far in to the land of the absurd. Theeasily spotted plot turn does help but the rather uninspiring cartoonaction just sinks it. Too many "WTF?" moments in both the action andthe plot to enjoy this movie unless you really relate to a frustratednobody stuck in a dead-end job and you want to fantasize about becomingan assassin. I can't figure out what was worse, the few Matrix type ripoffs or the bizarre Rocky type killer training session? Also, how didthey manage to make Angelina Jolie so unattractive? Not only does shelook anorexic but add in the God awful tattoos and there is NOTHINGsexually appealing about the character.

    Ridiculous, un-inspired action mixed with possibly the dumbest plot ofany movie this century means Wanted is one to avoid at all cost.

  4. Alan Chamberlain from United States
    30 Mar 2012, 5:44 pm

    Like so many modern Hollywood moves "wanted" looks and sounds great butis a poorly conceived and written and is ultimately not a good movie.It's another in a long list of movies that is technically excellent butuninspired and unfulfilling.

    What killed the film for me was that it was utterly ridiculous from topto bottom. From the opening scene you think you are watching somethinglike the "Matrix" but the movie never gets around to explaining howthese assassins attain superpowers. If I could train hard for a fewmonths getting the sh*t beat out of me and bathing in krispy kremesugar and somehow develop superpowers to defy all know laws of physics,I would get started right away. It wants to look and feel like reality,but unlike comic book movies like "Ironman", it asks you to swallow waymore implausible nonsense than you may be able to stomach. In fact,"Ironman" looks like a documentary compared to this noisy, overdone"rollercoaster". I did not know going in that the movie was based on acomic about superheroes and supervillians. They should have committedmore to that…there effort to make the movie "real" just made it asloppy mess.

    So it's a fantasy film that I found difficult to get into. The actionis well done, the effects look great, but its another case where youare lucky not to have an epileptic fit by the first hour from all theflash cutting and gimmicks. Half the movie is in bullet time.

    And then of course there is the loom, which is just a retarded conceptand in the face of everything else, I found myself rolling my eyes. Ifthey had spent half the time they spent on effects working on thestory, we would all have been better off.

    James McAvoy does his best with what he's given and its his performancethat keeps the movie from slipping even further into the abyss. Jolieis always great but not given much to do here but look sexy…

  5. MAShead07 from United Kingdom
    30 Mar 2012, 5:44 pm

    This film is saturated with absurdity, in an attempt to wow audienceswith special effects they have already seen countless times in thelikes of Die Hard and Bourne. Nothing new in this film, just a numberof Hollywood cliché's, including the sob story told by a narrator inthe third person, which ultimately turns out to be their own sob story,and even the Star Wars idea of the central character seeking to avengetheir father's death, only for the villain to say "No, I am yourfather".

    The rest of the plot comprises of special effects, absurdity (laughingAT not WITH the film), excessive blood and shooting and swearing andachieves nothing by doing so. James McAvoy totally lets himself down inthis role- he was brilliant in "Last King of Scotland", but doesn't dohimself justice as soon as he starts speaking in a pretty naff Americanaccent. His character isn't that believable, and his excessive swearingmakes him more unrealistic, instead of realistic. The rest of the cast,including veteran Morgan Freeman, are paper-thin characters, which alsolets them down as actors. As the characters die, it is difficult to beupset as you barely know them or sympathise with them.

    Although there were some interesting twists in the end, they fail tosalvage a film that's only purpose was to try and lure people in withmindless violence, blood and bad language with very little substance.The script is also quite poor, like many modern action films. In myview, this is trying to outdo Goodfellas in violence, bad language andblood, but otherwise would fail miserably in competing on the scale ofquality and credibility. A further demonstration of unoriginality inHollywood film-making.

  6. nicbarber from United Kingdom
    30 Mar 2012, 5:44 pm

    I am a massive James McAvoy fan since his Shameless(UK) days, so was abit iffy on how he would transfer to an action movie. Despite a fairperformance from him (even if his American accent is hard to believeand turns back to his native Scottish every now and then), my friendwho dragged me along apologised profusely once the film had finished.Here's some of my problems with the film.

    1.) The Script. If the script was good, I'd be able to get over thelack a story line. It started poor, I was hoping for an upsurge, but itnever came, making Jolie,McAvoy, Freeman (and the rest, including theguy from Hustle (UK) -what was his point?) just look daft.

    2.) The first 20 mins, at least, is about how the main guy's life iscrap. In the matrix, this lasted about 5 minutes before getting intothe action.

    3.) All McAvoy does in the 2nd 20 mins is scream!

    4.) How much slow-motion does one director need? even the kissingscene? really!

    5.) The Twist really is cringeworthy – you can tell that the scriptread: Cross- "Wesley, I'm your father!" Before they realised thatGeorge Lucas had already used that line, so they had to quick-change itto "You're my son!"

    One redeeming feature – you get to see Morgan Freeman say 'Kill thatMother-F****r. I always knew he was Samuel L Jackson in disguise!

    Action wise, it's good if a bit unbelievable, (but that's what filmsare for…) and the special effects are OK. Shame about the script…

  7. raypdaley182 from Coventry
    30 Mar 2012, 5:44 pm

    Suspend all disbelief. There's not a single element of realism in thismovie & it's a very sad attempt to try & make a comic into a movie thenfailing badly as the source material clearly wasn't strong enough.

    I'd normally class Morgan Freeman & Angelina Jolie as a good cast butsadly they've got awful roles. The script itself is truly dire, basedon a comic I've never read or heard of ever.

    Basically we're in a world of superhero assassins where their abilitiesare right out of The Matrix. The film borrows heavily from things likeBulletproof Monk (I don't actually think there's a single original ideain the whole movie) and viewers are expecting to suspend way too muchbelief.

    The film has too much action (yes, you read that right! Too much!) andsuffers in the same way Bad Boys 2 did, just having action scenes forthe sake of it because there was no plot or script to follow so they'djust engineer an action sequence for no reason at all than seeing thehero or the other assassins use their magical powers.

    We're following Wesley Gibson, a nobody who is dragged into the worldof the assassins and trains to become one to kill the man who killedhis father. Except thats not the case, the man he kills IS his fatherand the guy in charge of the assassins (Morgan Freeman in possibly hisworst movie role ever) has started to create targets for his ownprofit.

    The film is truly awful, ignore the plot because it's nonexistent.Enjoy looking at Fox (Angelina Jolie) until she decides to kill herselfnear the end of the film. Terrance Stamp is woefully underused & hischaracter could have done much more.

    If you can ignore the ridiculous special effects, CGI and over the topaction sequences then you might get a bit of pleasure from watchingthis. Personally I hated it and if you've seen the trailers then you'veseen the best bits of the movie as it really doesn't get any betterthan the trailer.

  8. lothd from Bangkok, Thailand
    30 Mar 2012, 5:44 pm

    Mindless action films abound and can be fun. This is not a mindlessaction film, but its "mind" caters to nerdy dreams of becoming amore-than-human being. Wouldn't we all like to suddenly have $3.5million in our bank accounts, tell off our extremely annoying boss (isthere any other kind?) and get trained as an ultra-assassin? Then justshoot everybody they tell you to or have a quick case of conscience,then shoot them – cool? Not.

    One scene is ripped straight from "The Matrix" series of films and theoverall feeling is overwhelmingly Matrix/Terminator. Perhaps it'soveroptimistic to look for something new in a movie of this type, butthere's hardly anything original. This is not a film the world needsnow – or ever.

  9. theoneeggy (theoneeggy@gmail.com) from California, United States
    30 Mar 2012, 5:44 pm

    I watched this movie the other day, and I was actually quite excited.However, I was quickly turned from this opinion within the first 30minutes of the movie. It got progressively worse until the ending,starting with the mass-murder/suicide and then the replay – revenge hitat the end of the movie. This ending was simply painful. Morgan Freemanis killing his career with movies like this. I appreciate the writersability to adapt graphic novel to the big screen, but in all honestythis has to be the worst comic book or graphic novel movie ever. Saveyourself the time and do something that will at least stimulate yourbrain: READ THE BOOK, forget the movie

  10. whlrguy from United States
    30 Mar 2012, 5:44 pm

    I just got back from an advanced screening of Wanted. I have to admitnot being a fan of the Director, Tim Bekmambetov. Somewhat disappointedin his Russian Films Nightwatch and Daywatch. However, in his Americandirectorial he delivers!! An abundance of profanities and over the topaction sequences that are beyond xtreme fill the screen in a dizzyingarray of visual adrenaline. Holding you in a tight breathtaking gripwith its interesting visual techniques, humor and acting. James McAvoy(the sweet faun from the Chronicles of Narnia) plays the loser we allknow, Wesley Gibbon. The guy, who just trudges through life allowinghimself to be walked upon, humiliated and has no desire to escape it,except in a bottle of anti-anxiety meds. Enter a beautiful Woman, Fox(Angelie Jolie), a mysterious wise man Sloan (Morgan Freeman) and hislife instantly changes from Billing Reports to Gratuitous Violence,Mastering Weaponry Skills, and Assassination. Believe me when I saywhat the Matrix introduced, Wanted has mastered. The director is askilled artist at using the camera in conveying visual emotions ofWesley like I have never seen before, wait I take that back, seen it inNightWatch. I definitely recommend this deliberately humorous, actionpacked, violent, profane, to-the-extreme film to be seen on the bigscreen – check this one out!!

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