The Incredible Hulk (2008) Poster

The Incredible Hulk (2008)

  • Rate: 7.0/10 total 131,281 votes 
  • Genre: Action | Sci-Fi | Thriller
  • Release Date: 13 June 2008 (USA)
  • Runtime: 112 min
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The Incredible Hulk (2008)

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  • IMDb page: The Incredible Hulk (2008)
  • Rate: 7.0/10 total 131,281 votes 
  • Genre: Action | Sci-Fi | Thriller
  • Release Date: 13 June 2008 (USA)
  • Runtime: 112 min
  • Filming Location: Arlington, Virginia, USA
  • Budget: $150,000,000(estimated)
  • Gross: $263,427,551(Worldwide)
  • Director: Louis Leterrier
  • Stars: Edward Norton, Liv Tyler and Tim Roth
  • Original Music By: Craig Armstrong   
  • Soundtrack: Over Under Around And Through
  • Sound Mix: Dolby Digital | SDDS | DTS
  • Plot Keyword: Hulk | Cure | Scientist | Destruction | Hero

Writing Credits By:

  • Zak Penn (screenplay)
  • Zak Penn (screen story)

Known Trivia

  • The film joined Toronto’s Green-Screen initiative, to help cut carbon emissions and waste created during filming. Hybrid and fuel-efficient vehicles were used, with low-sulphur diesel as their energy source. For constructing the sets, the production department used a sustainably-harvested locally-sourced yellow pine, instead of the commonly-used lauan, and afterwards the wood was either recycled or given to environmental organizations. Paints with no/low volatile organic compounds were used, and paint cans were handed to waste management. A contractor was on set to remove bins. Environmentally-friendly items used on the set included cloth bags, biodegradable food containers, china and silverware food utensils, recycled paper, biodegradable soap and cleaners, rechargeable batteries and stainless steel mugs (one for each production member). Producer Gale Anne Hurd hopes the film will be a symbol of the drive to encourage less pollution from film productions.
  • Louis Leterrier had been interested in directing Iron Man, but when Jon Favreau took that project Avi Arad offered him a sequel to Hulk.
  • William Hurt and his son are big fans of the Hulk.
  • Although director Louis Leterrier liked Hulk, he concurred with Marvel Studios that to continue the franchise it would be better to deviate from Ang Lee’s cerebral style from the first film and focus on a more action-filled tone. He also believed that in keeping with Hulk’s poetic feel, the VFX were mostly “a fluorescent-green guy who was simply flying around; he had no weight and was too smooth-looking,” so he wished to make the film’s VFX grittier and darker “and perhaps even a little scarier!”
  • The Hulk, as portrayed in this film, was created through a blend of motion capture and key frame animation (by Rhythm & Hues). Hulk’s VFX were carried out by Industrial Light & Magic, with its director Ang Lee providing motion-capture.
  • Edward Norton, who had previously rewritten films he starred in, wrote a draft of the script which Louis Leterrier and Marvel Studios found satisfactory in establishing the film as a reboot of Hulk. As Norton explained, “I don’t think that in great literature/films explaining the story’s roots means it comes in the beginning. Audiences know the story, so we’re dealing with it artfully.” Norton’s rewrite added the character of Doc Samson and mentioned references to other Marvel Comics characters. He also wanted to put in “revelations about what set the whole thing in motion” that would be explained in future installments.
  • Louis Leterrier directed four units with a broken foot.
  • It took the VFX artists over a year to construct a shot where Dr. Banner’s gamma-irradiated blood falls through three factory stories into a bottle.
  • After the Hulk appears at Culver University, two students are interviewed in the news, named Jack McGee and Jim Wilson. Jack McGee was a tabloid reporter who attempted to track down the Hulk in The Incredible Hulk, and in the comics Jim Wilson was a young orphan who befriended the Hulk.
  • Betty Ross buys Bruce some purple pants. In the comics, the Hulk is almost always seen wearing purple pants.

Goofs: Incorrectly regarded as goofs: When Bruce is delivering the pizza, he rides a bicycle through the campus. As he weaves through the crowd we hear a bicycle bell. There is no bell on the bike's handle bars. But the bicycle bell sound could be came from those other bikes around the scene.

Plot: Dr. Bruce Banner, thanks to a gamma ray experiment gone wrong, transforms into a giant green-skinned hulk whenever his pulse rate gets too high. Meanwhile, a soldier uses the same technology to become an evil version of the original. Full summary »  »

Story: Depicting the events after the Gamma Bomb. 'The Incredible Hulk' tells the story of Dr Bruce Banner, who seeks a cure to his unique condition, which causes him to turn into a giant green monster under emotional stress. Whilst on the run from military which seeks his capture, Banner comes close to a cure. But all is lost when a new creature emerges; The Abomination.Written by Graham Kroon  

Synopsis

Synopsis: Bruce Banner (Edward Norton) is a scientist working to find a way to use gamma radiation to increase healing time in soldiers. One of his co-workers is Betty Ross (Liv Tyler), whose father, General Thaddeus "Thunderbolt" Ross (William Hurt), oversees the project. Upon subjecting himself to a gamma test, Banner transforms into a green-skinned, superhumanly powerful creature. He destroys the lab, injures Betty and Ross and escapes.

Several years later, he surfaces in Brazil, working at a local soft drink factory. He trains with martial artists on how to control his gamma-irradiated anger, and communicates via encrypted e-mail with Mr. Blue about developing a cure. Ross has continued to search for him, believing that Banner is effectively the property of the United States government. Thanks to an accident at the factory, Ross tracks Banner to Brazil. He assembles a strike force led by a ruthless British soldier, Emil Blonsky (Tim Roth) and sends them after Banner. They chase Banner through the city and into the soft drink factory. Banner is also pursued by several hooligans who dislike him. When the hooligans attack Banner, he loses control of his anger and transforms into his green alter ego just as the strike team arrives. He makes quick work of the hooligans and strike team, then leaps his way out of Brazil.

Blonsky demands that Ross tell him the truth about Banner. Ross reveals that the goal of the program was not to develop new ways of treating injuries but to create an army of invincible super soldiers. Blonsky is intrigued and, recognizing that he is at the end of his career at age 39, asks to be given the super soldier formula himself. Ross agrees and Blonsky undergoes an extremely painful procedure which makes him shart out blood/crap his pants and the operating table he’s laying upon.

Banner returns to the United States, in particular to a college town in Virginia. Betty still teaches there. Banner sneaks into a computer laboratory and downloads vital information about the experiments and his own physiognomy. That night, Betty and her new boyfriend, Leonard Samson (Ty Burrell) see Banner in a restaurant. Betty takes Banner home, but Samson contacts Ross. Banner plans to leave the next day but Ross’s forces attack him on campus. Banner transforms again, and witnesses to the battle dub him "the Hulk." During the fight, Blonsky confronts Hulk and displays superhuman reflexes, but Hulk kicks Blonsky into a tree, shattering every bone in his body. Betty is nearly killed in a helicopter assault. Hulk rescues her and takes her to safety. During a rain storm, Hulk becomes scared of the thunder and hurls rocks at it. Betty calms him down. The next morning, she checks them into a motel and buys him new clothes. They decide to go to New York and meet Mr. Blue. On the way, Betty suggests that some of Banner’s personality remains when he is in Hulk form, but Banner angrily rejects this notion. He wants to be rid of the Hulk, not find a way to control it.

Ross is pleasantly surprised to see Blonsky has completely healed from his grievous injuries. However, he doesn’t notice the bony spines beginning to protrude from Blonsky’s back.

Mr. Blue is really Samuel Sterns (Tim Blake Nelson), a professor at a college in New York City. He reveals to Banner that he has a procedure that might suppress the Hulk reaction but probably not cure Banner. However, he wants to continue to study Banner so they can find a way to use his blood to cure countless diseases. Banner refuses to allow that, but agrees to undergo Sterns’s suppression procedure. It seems to work. However, Ross has tracked Banner to Sterns’s office. This time, Banner is successfully captured. Betty tells Ross that she no longer considers him her father. Blonsky confronts Sterns and asks to be exposed to Banner’s irradiated blood. Sterns warns him that the result could be "an abomination" but Blonsky insists. The result: Blonsky turns into an enormous, scaly Abomination. He leaps from Sterns’s laboratory. In the chaos, Sterns ingests some of Banner’s blood himself. His head begins to mutate.

Insane with power, Blonsky goes on a rampage in Harlem. In the helicopter taking them to custody, Banner, Betty and Ross see television footage of the destruction. Banner believes he can now control the Hulk. He leaps from the helicopter and transforms into the Hulk just before he hits the ground. He and Abomination wage a fierce battle. Abomination knocks the helicopter with Ross and Betty in it from the sky. Just as Abomination is about to kill them, Hulk stops him and nearly strangles Abomination to death with heavy chains. Betty’s horrified reaction keeps Hulk from actually killing Abomination, however. Instead, he leaps away, eventually winding up in British Columbia. Weeks of meditation help Banner finally gain control of his alter ego.

Ross sits in a bar, smoking his trademark cigars and drinking himself into a stupor. Billionaire industrialist Tony Stark (Robert Downey, Jr.) enters and suggests that a team he is putting together just might help Ross solve his Hulk problem.

 

FullCast & Crew

Produced By:

  • Avi Arad known as producer
  • Stephen Broussard known as associate producer
  • Kevin Feige known as producer
  • Gale Anne Hurd known as producer
  • Stan Lee known as executive producer
  • David Maisel known as executive producer
  • Michael J. Malone known as associate producer (as Michael Malone)
  • John G. Scotti known as associate producer (as John Scotti)
  • Jim Van Wyck known as executive producer
  • Kurt Williams known as co-producer

FullCast & Crew:

  • Edward Norton known as Bruce Banner
  • Liv Tyler known as Betty Ross
  • Tim Roth known as Emil Blonsky
  • William Hurt known as General 'Thunderbolt' Ross
  • Tim Blake Nelson known as Samuel Sterns
  • Ty Burrell known as Leonard
  • Christina Cabot known as Major Kathleen Sparr
  • Peter Mensah known as General Joe Greller
  • Lou Ferrigno known as The Incredible Hulk / Security Guard (voice)
  • Paul Soles known as Stanley
  • Débora Nascimento known as Martina
  • Greg Bryk known as Commando
  • Chris Owens known as Commando
  • Al Vrkljan known as Commando (as Alan Vrkljan)
  • Adrian Hein known as Commando
  • John MacDonald known as Commando
  • Shaun McComb known as Helicopter Soldier
  • Simon Wong known as Grad Student
  • Pedro Salvín known as Tough Guy Leader
  • Julio Cesar Torres Dantas known as Tough Guy
  • Raimundo Camargo Nascimento known as Tough Guy
  • Nick Alachiotis known as Tough Guy
  • Jason Burke known as Communications Officer
  • Grant Nickalls known as Helicopter Pilot
  • Joris Jarsky known as Soldier
  • Arnold Pinnock known as Soldier
  • Tig Fong known as Cop
  • Jason Hunter known as Cop
  • Maxwell McCabe-Lokos known as Cab Driver
  • David Collins known as Medical Technician
  • John Carvalho known as Plant Manager
  • Robin Wilcock known as Sniper
  • Wayne Robson known as Boat Captain
  • Javier Lambert known as Guatemalan Trucker
  • Martin Starr known as Computer Nerd
  • Chris Ratz known as Young Guy
  • Todd Hofley known as Apache Helicopter Pilot
  • Joe La Loggia known as Soldier
  • Tamsen McDonough known as Colleague
  • Michael Kenneth Williams known as Harlem Bystander
  • Roberto Bakker known as Market Vendor
  • Ruru Sacha known as Supply Driver
  • James Downing known as Army Base Doctor
  • Rickson Gracie known as Aikido Instructor
  • Stephen Gartner known as Ross's Soldier
  • Nicholas Rose known as McGee
  • Genelle Williams known as Terrified Gal
  • P.J. Kerr known as Wilson
  • Jee-Yun Lee known as Reporter
  • Desmond Campbell known as Gunner
  • DeShaun Clarke known as Little Boy
  • Tony Nappo known as Brave Cop
  • Aaron Berg known as Soldier
  • David Meunier known as Soldier (as David Miller)
  • Tre Smith known as Soldier
  • Moses Nyarko known as Soldier
  • Carlos A. González known as BOPE Officer (as Carlos A. Gonzalez)
  • Yan Regis known as Medic Soldier
  • Stephen Broussard known as Handsome Soldier
  • Robert Morse known as Command Van Soldier
  • Matt Purdy known as Ross's Aide
  • Lenka Matuska known as Female Medical Assistant
  • Scott Magee known as Humvee Driver
  • Wes Berger known as Sterns Lab Soldier
  • Carla Nascimento known as Large Woman
  • Krista Vendy known as Female Bartender
  • Mila Stromboni known as Hopscotch Girl
  • Jim Annan known as Intelligence Officer (uncredited)
  • David Bianchi known as (voice) (uncredited)
  • Bill Bixby known as Tom Corbett (archive footage) (uncredited)
  • Rick Cordeiro known as Taxi Driver (uncredited)
  • Brandon Cruz known as Eddie Corbett (archive footage) (uncredited)
  • Robert Downey Jr. known as Tony Stark (uncredited)
  • Aric Dupere known as Jeep Driver (uncredited)
  • Kieran Gallant known as Test Subject (uncredited)
  • Jay Hunter known as Cop #2 (uncredited)
  • Dave Kiner known as Man (uncredited)
  • Stan Lee known as Milwaukee Man Drinking From Bottle (uncredited)
  • Richard D. Leko known as Student / Car Driver (uncredited)
  • Dan MacDonald known as News Crew (uncredited)
  • François Mequer known as NYPD Cop (uncredited)
  • Ishan Morris known as Student (uncredited)
  • Billy Parrott known as Security Guard (uncredited)
  • Imali Perera known as Female Faculty Member (uncredited)
  • Kristina Pesic known as Sorority Girl (uncredited)
  • Avi Phillips known as Student in Lab (uncredited)
  • Dylan Taylor known as Keg Guy (uncredited)
  • Max Topplin known as Jimmy – Older boy (uncredited)
  • Miyoshi Umeki known as Mrs. Livingston (archive footage) (uncredited)
  • J.A. Worthington known as Student (uncredited)
  • Russell Yuen known as FBI Agent (uncredited)

..

 

Supporting Department

Makeup Department:
  • Fríða Aradóttir known as hair stylist: Mr. Norton (as Frida Aradottir)
  • Stacey Butterworth known as wig maker
  • Beate Eisele known as makeup artist (as Beate Petruccelli)
  • Paul R.J. Elliot known as key hair stylist (as Paul Elliot)
  • Paula Fleet known as assistant hair stylist
  • Iantha Goldberg known as makeup artist
  • Ton Hyl known as makeup artist: Rio
  • Burton J. LeBlanc known as key makeup artist: second unit (as Burton Leblanc)
  • Marilu Mattos known as makeup & hair: Rio second unit
  • Candice Ornstein known as assistant makeup artist
  • Colin Penman known as first assistant makeup artist
  • Richard Redlefsen known as prosthetic makeup artist: additional photography, Los Angeles
  • Jordan Samuel known as key makeup artist
  • Cathy Shibley known as key hair stylist: second unit
  • Sondra Treilhard known as assistant hair stylist
  • Randy Westgate known as makeup artist: Mr. Norton
  • Sandra Wheatle known as key makeup artist: second unit
  • Tim Mogg known as makeup artist (uncredited)

Art Department:

  • Darleen Abbott known as construction accountant
  • Allyssa Allain known as art department production assistant
  • Fabian Bolzonello known as carpenter
  • Rob Bonney known as head carpenter
  • Jacques M. Bradette known as set dresser
  • Rudy Braun known as set designer
  • Cameron S. Brooke known as key scenic artist
  • Robert C. Brooke known as lead scenic artist
  • Timothy Burgard known as storyboard artist
  • Carlos Caneca known as leadman
  • Michaela Cheyne known as first assistant art director
  • David Chow known as digital set designer
  • Noreen Coyne known as art department coordinator
  • Brian Cranstone known as carpenter
  • David DeMarinis known as set dresser
  • Darrin Denlinger known as storyboard artist
  • Lisa Dietrich known as key on-set dresser
  • Britt Doughty known as second assistant art director
  • David E. Duncan known as animatic artist
  • Dawn H. Fisher known as set decorating coordinator
  • Warren Flanagan known as concept artist
  • Tim Flattery known as illustrator
  • Napoleon Forbes known as painter
  • Kevin Forstner known as assistant head carpenter
  • David G. Fremlin known as set designer
  • Jeff Frost known as senior model maker
  • Vladislav Fyodorov known as set designer
  • Christopher Geggie known as property master
  • Beth Gilinsky known as art department coordinator
  • Jen Gillespie known as clearance and placement coordinator
  • Jen Gillespie known as second assistant art director
  • Dean Goodine known as property master: British Columbia
  • Rupert Gudgeon known as set dresser
  • Matthew Hallett known as metal fabricator
  • J. Ryan Halpenny known as second assistant art director
  • James Halpenny known as construction coordinator
  • Chris Hanson known as key scenic laborer
  • David Hirschfield known as set designer
  • Alexandra Hooper known as set decoration buyer
  • Sam Hudecki known as graphic artist
  • Kevin Hughes known as assistant head carpenter
  • Benton Jew known as storyboard artist
  • Steve Johnstone known as stand-by carpenter: second unit
  • Maria Leite known as assistant set decorator
  • Kevin Lise known as assistant property master
  • Glenn Locke known as stand-by painter
  • Michael Madden known as set designer
  • Sang Maier known as on-set dresser: second unit
  • Aleksandra Marinkovich known as set designer
  • Mike Medina known as construction coordinator: additional photography
  • Jeffrey A. Melvin known as assistant set decorator
  • Brad Milburn known as set designer
  • Mark Millicent known as art department
  • John Moran known as graphic designer
  • Rick Newsome known as storyboard artist
  • Melissa Olson known as on-set dresser: second unit
  • Gerrard Pace known as carpenter
  • Brian Patrick known as assistant property master
  • Timothy Peel known as graphics
  • Victor 'Chikko' Quon known as assistant head painter
  • Andrew Redekop known as set designer
  • Richard Reynolds known as digital set designer
  • Monica Rochlin known as set dresser
  • Steve Romolo known as carpenter
  • Dave Rosa known as head painter
  • Steven M. Saylor known as digital set designer
  • Damien Segee known as second assistant property
  • Dean Sherriff known as illustrator
  • Michael Shocrylas known as set designer
  • Aaron Sims known as concept artist
  • Adam Smith known as specialty prop fabricator
  • Jeff Smith known as second assistant art director
  • Travis Staley known as on-set carpenter
  • Mike Stanek known as set designer
  • Katy Thatcher known as art apprentice
  • Adrien Van Viersen known as storyboard artist
  • Sophie Vertigan known as scenic mould maker
  • Dan Wladyka known as set dec buyer
  • Milena Zdravkovic known as concept artist
  • Avril Dishaw known as assistant decorator (uncredited)
  • John Mainwaring known as props assistant (uncredited)
  • Philippe Maurais known as moldmaker/fiberglasser (uncredited)
  • Renata Otomura known as art department coordinator (uncredited)
  • Clara Rocha known as assistant property master (uncredited)
  • Constantine Sekeris known as conceptual designer (uncredited)

..

 

Company

Production Companies:

  • Universal Pictures (presents)
  • Marvel Enterprises (presents)
  • Marvel Studios
  • Valhalla Motion Pictures
  • MVL Incredible Productions

Other Companies:

  • Absolute Rentals  post-production rentals
  • Aaron Sims Company, The  concept art: Character Design
  • Amazon.com  soundtrack
  • Atlantic Cine Equipment  GyronFS aerial system
  • Bastyr University Chapel  music recorded at
  • Behind the Scenes Freight  shipping by
  • Chapman/Leonard Studio Equipment  camera dollies
  • Danetracks  sound design and editorial
  • Direct Tools & Fasteners  expendables
  • EFilm  digital intermediate
  • Fisher Technical Services Rentals  camera & performer flying system
  • Hand Prop  props supplied by
  • Internet On Set  on-set satellite internet
  • Kleiman Casting  casting
  • Marvel Entertainment  soundtrack
  • Momentous Insurance Brokerage  insurance
  • Momentous Insurance Brokerage  production insurance services
  • Movie Armaments Group  firearms provided by
  • Northway-Photomap (Lidar)  3-D scanning
  • Northwest Sinfonia  music performed by
  • OTC Productions  digital asset management
  • Pictorvision  aerial camera system
  • Prologue Films  titles
  • Rockbottom Rentals  cell phone rentals
  • Scarlet Letters  end titles
  • Synxspeed  sound post-production (foreign dub)
  • Toronto Film Studios  movie studio
  • Wildfire Studios  adr recording facility
  • William F. White International  grip and lighting equipment

Distributors:

  • Universal Pictures (2008) (USA) (theatrical)
  • Bontonfilm (2008) (Czech Republic) (theatrical)
  • Concorde Filmverleih (2008) (Germany) (theatrical)
  • Forum Cinemas (2008) (Estonia) (theatrical)
  • Forum Cinemas (2008) (Lithuania) (theatrical)
  • Forum Cinemas (2008) (Latvia) (theatrical)
  • Paramount Pictures (2008) (Australia) (theatrical)
  • Paramount Pictures (2008) (New Zealand) (theatrical)
  • Paramount Pictures (2008) (France) (theatrical)
  • SND (2008) (France) (theatrical)
  • Sony Pictures Entertainment (2008) (Japan) (theatrical)
  • Sony Pictures Releasing (2008) (Spain) (theatrical)
  • Tatrafilm (2008) (Slovakia) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2008) (Argentina) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2008) (Greece) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2008) (Sweden) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2008) (Singapore) (theatrical)
  • Universal Pictures Canada (2008) (Canada) (theatrical)
  • Universal Pictures International (UPI) (2008) (Switzerland) (theatrical)
  • Universal Pictures International (UPI) (2008) (Germany) (theatrical)
  • Universal Pictures International (UPI) (2008) (UK) (theatrical)
  • Universal Pictures International (UPI) (2008) (Italy) (theatrical)
  • Universal Pictures International (UPI) (2008) (Netherlands) (theatrical)
  • Universal Pictures International (UPI) (2008) (Russia) (theatrical)
  • Argentina Video Home (2008) (Argentina) (DVD)
  • Argentina Video Home (2009) (Argentina) (DVD) (Blu-ray)
  • Concorde Video (2008) (Germany) (DVD)
  • Universal Pictures Benelux (2008) (Netherlands) (DVD)
  • Universal Pictures Benelux (2008) (Netherlands) (DVD) (Blu-ray)
  • Universal Pictures Canada (2008) (Canada) (DVD)
  • Universal Pictures Nordic (2008) (Sweden) (DVD)
  • Universal Studios Home Entertainment (2008) (USA) (DVD)
  • Universal Studios Home Entertainment (2008) (USA) (DVD) (Blu-ray)
  • fX Network (2010) (USA) (TV)

..

 

Other Stuff

Special Effects:

  • Rhythm and Hues (special visual effects) (as Rhythm & Hues Studios)
  • Soho VFX (visual effects)
  • Hydraulx (visual effects) (as [hy*drau"lx])
  • Image Engine Design (visual effects) (as Image Engine)
  • Pixel Liberation Front (visualization services)
  • Giant Studios (motion capture services)
  • Mova (facial motion capture) (as Mova Contour)
  • Lola Visual Effects (visual effects) (as Lola VFX)
  • G Creative Solutions (visual effects)
  • X1fx (visual effects)
  • Gentle Giant Studios (cyber scanning)
  • Photomap (sets and locations scanned by)
  • Lidar Services (lidar scanning and modeling)
  • ADi (prosthetic construction)
  • Amalgamated Dynamics (additional visual effects)

Visual Effects by:

  • Alberto Abril known as animator
  • Kiran Ahlawat known as match move technical director
  • Amit Aidasani known as educator
  • Shish Aikat known as educator: Rhythm & Hues
  • Erik Akutagawa known as scan record manager
  • Mithun Jacob Alex known as rotoscope artist: Rhythm & Hues, India
  • Candice Alger known as executive producer: Giant Studios
  • Mir Z. Ali known as technical director: Rhythm and Hues
  • Samuel Alicea known as texture painter: Rhythm & Hues Studios
  • Casey Allen known as senior flame artist
  • Sean Amlaner known as digital compositor: Rhythm & Hues
  • Chih-Jen Chang Andy known as compositing technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Spencer Armajo known as roto and paint artist
  • Andrew Arnett known as animation supervisor
  • Ray Arnett known as animator
  • Charles Arulraj known as roto/prep artist
  • Artin Aryaei known as compositor: Image Engine
  • Jeff Atherton known as visual effects coordinator: Hydraulx
  • Nicholas Augello known as technical animator
  • Jarrod Avalos known as matchmove artist
  • Randall Bahnsen known as lead technical animator
  • Bhavika Bajpai known as texture artist
  • Anand Balasubramaniam known as matchmove lead: Rhythm & Hues, India
  • Adam Balentine known as digital compositor: Rhythm & Hues
  • Scott Balkcom known as digital compositor
  • Bill Houston Ball known as visual effects technical director
  • Ido Banai known as flame artist: Hydraulx
  • Sachin Bangera known as matchmove technical director
  • Berj Bannayan known as visual effects supervisor: Soho VFX
  • Tony Barraza known as digital compositor: Rhythm and Hues
  • Kevin Beason known as software engineer
  • Jeffery Beeland known as pipeline technical director: Rhythm and Hues
  • Ori Ben-Shabat known as visual effects artist: Image Engine
  • Bryan Bentley known as tech animator
  • Wes Benton known as motion capture production coordinator: Giant Studios
  • Scott Berri known as effects coordinator: Rhythm & Hues
  • Lisa Berridge known as production assistant: Soho VFX
  • Jeetendra G. Bhagtani known as animator: Rhythm and Hues, India
  • Abhishek Bharadwaj known as animation layout technical director
  • Nikhil Bhatnagar known as render coordinator
  • Emil Bidiuc known as animator
  • Adam Blank known as matchmove technical director
  • James Bluma known as visual effects editor: Rhythm & Hues
  • Bhargava Boini known as roto/prep artist
  • Stefanie Boose known as visual effects producer: Image Engine
  • Swapnil Borawake known as matchmove technical director: Rhythm & Hues, India
  • Tiffany Borchardt known as lighting technical director
  • Steve Bowen known as digital intermediate colorist
  • Edward Derian Boyke known as render I/O coordinator
  • Christopher Bozzetto known as texture artist
  • Ryan Bradley known as animator
  • Tom Bradley known as look development artist
  • Jared Brient known as lighting/shading artist: Hydraulx
  • John Britto known as backgound preparation technical director
  • Mark A. Brown known as vice president of technology: Rhythm & Hues
  • Matt Brown known as technical animation supervisor
  • Kevin R. Browne known as effects artist: Hydraulx
  • Erik Bruhwiler known as compositing coordinator: Hydraulx
  • Harry Russell Brutsche known as lighting lead: Rhythm & Hues Studios
  • Jud Bumpas known as pipeline technical director: Rhythm and Hues Studios
  • Nicholas Burkard known as technical animator
  • Jeremy F. Butler known as animator
  • Keanan Cantrell known as lighting technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Marco Capparelli known as animator
  • Marla Carter known as digital compositor
  • Steve Carter known as visual effects coordinator
  • Jesus Castillo known as support staff
  • Vaughn Cato known as motion capture operator
  • Tyler Cayce known as technical animator
  • Min Hyun Cha known as digital compositor
  • Kent Chan known as technical animator
  • Claire Chandou known as visual effects accountant
  • Theju Chandran known as digital paint/rotoscope artist: Rhythm and Hues Studios
  • Serena Chang known as texture artist: Rhythm and Hues Studios
  • Jo-Wan Chao known as modeling technical director
  • Gordon Chapman known as effects technical director
  • Freddy Chavez Olmos known as visual effects compositor: Image Engine (as Freddy Chavez)
  • Daniel Chavez known as visual effects production assistant
  • Andrew Chi known as visual effects
  • Kunal Chindarkar known as rotoscope/background prep artist: Rhythm & Hues Studios
  • Vikas Chirate known as systems administrator
  • Jung-Yoon Choi known as modeler: Rhythm & Hues
  • Sandesh Chonkar known as modeler
  • Patrick Clancey known as digital opticals
  • Trent Claus known as Flame artist
  • Andrew M. Collins known as matchmove artist
  • Daniel Aristoteles Collins known as systems/operations: Rhythm & Hues
  • Cameron Coombs known as digital compositor: Hydraulx
  • Chase Cooper known as character technical director: Hydraulx
  • Joshua Cordes known as animation supervisor: Hydraulx
  • Kevin Coutinho known as matchmove technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Doug Cram known as digital compositor
  • Michael Crane known as digital compositor: Rhythm & Hues
  • Ryan Cromie known as texture artist
  • Colin Cunningham known as lighting lead: Soho VFX
  • Sean Cushing known as visual effects executive producer: Pixel Liberation Front
  • Julie D'Antoni known as head of production: Rhythm & Hues Studios
  • Amanda Dague known as lead animator
  • Rajdeep Dandekar known as roto/prep artist: Rhythm & Hues (2008)
  • Ian Dawson known as visual effects producer
  • Amy Daye known as digital compositor: Soho VFX
  • Christabel Dcruz known as matchmove technical director: Rhythm and Hues, India
  • Luke De Souza known as compositor
  • Chris De St Jeor known as technical animator
  • Dave Dean known as digital artist
  • Yoshi DeHerrera known as 3D laser scanning
  • Julio Del Hierro known as texture artist: Soho VFX
  • Nigel Denton-Howes known as asset lead: Image Engine
  • Ashutosh Deshmukh known as matchmove artist
  • Nikhil Deshmukh known as animator: Rhythm & Hues Studios
  • Raffael Dickreuter known as motion capture technical director
  • Raffael Dickreuter known as previs animator: Pixel Liberation Front
  • Chrysta Dieterly known as texture painter
  • Amol Dighe known as render coordinator
  • Dan Dixon known as cg supervisor
  • Ryan Donoghue known as animation lead: Rhythm & Hues
  • Monette Dubin known as visual effects coordinator
  • Nancy Duff known as digital production coordinator: India
  • Gus Duron known as digital opticals editor
  • Eric Ebling known as cg effects artist: [Hy*drau"lx]
  • Sam Edwards known as digital compositor
  • John Egli known as digital compositor
  • Nadav Ehrlich known as sequence lead: Soho VFX
  • Avedis Ekmekjian known as lighting lead
  • Hanoz Elavia known as systems engineer: Image Engine
  • Tamer Eldib known as modeler
  • Mohsen Eletreby known as visual effects editor: Hydraulx
  • Colin Elliott known as lead animation layout: Rhythm & Hues
  • Janeen Elliott known as senior compositor: Image Engine
  • Chris Elmer known as lighting artist
  • Nicholas Elwell known as assistant coordinator
  • Hiroshi Endo known as design and animation: Prologue Films
  • Edy Enriquez known as visual effects producer
  • Marcus Erbar known as technical director: Hydraulx
  • Tony Etienne known as lead look development artist
  • Devin Fairbairn known as tracking lead: X1FX
  • Ian Fellows known as compositor: Image Engine
  • Patrick Flannery known as visual effects stills photographer
  • Duane Floch known as previz supervisor: Pixel Liberation Front
  • Justin Folk known as animation coordinator: Rhythm and Hues
  • Justin Folk known as look development coordinator: Rhythm and Hues
  • Edwin Fong known as senior texture painter: Rhythm & Hues
  • Dan Foster known as visual effects producer: Rhythm & Hues Studios
  • Tyler Fox known as character rigger
  • Wes Franklin known as texture painter
  • Patricia Frazier known as lighting technical director
  • Janet Freedland known as digital artist
  • Chris Fregoso known as compositor
  • Lori Freitag-Hild known as compositor: Main Title
  • Mike Frevert known as digital artist
  • Bradley Friedman known as character rigging supervisor: Pixel Liberation Front
  • Maki Fukumoto known as motion capture editor: Giant Studios
  • Sarah Fuller known as scene lighter
  • Nicole Galaz known as systems operator
  • Eric Gamache known as production assistant: visual effects unit
  • Eric Gamache known as visual effects production assistant
  • Victor J. Garza known as technical animator
  • Pranav Kumar Gautam known as match move technical director: Rhythm & Hues, India
  • Denil George known as matchmove technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Bill Georgiou known as sequence supervisor
  • Divakar Ghodake known as modeling technical director
  • Daniel Gilbert known as lighting technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Matthew Gilson known as digital matte painter: Hydraulx
  • Logan Gloor known as lighting technical director
  • Victor Grant known as effects technical director
  • Robert Greb known as digital compositor
  • Stephanie Greenquist known as digital coordinator: India
  • Sebastian Greese known as lighting artist: Image Engine
  • Aaron Grey known as technical animator
  • Jon Grinberg known as visual effects editor
  • Miguel A. Guerrero known as senior visual effects artist
  • Erol Gunduz known as technical director: Pixel Liberation Front
  • Shyam Gurumoorthy known as digital compositor: Soho VFX
  • Shyam Gurumoorthy known as texture artist: Soho VFX
  • Robin Hackl known as visual effects supervisor: Image Engine
  • John Haddon known as lead research and development programmer: Image Engine
  • Brian Hajek known as compositor
  • Simon Halpern known as previs artist: Pixel Liberation Front
  • Justin Hammond known as lighting technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Giles Hancock known as matte painter: Image Engine
  • Dan Haring known as lighting technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Joe Harkins known as animator
  • Anthony Harris known as color timer
  • Max Harris known as Flame artist: Hydraulx
  • John Lake Harvey known as digital compositor: Rhythm & Hues
  • Leann Harvey known as visual effects production coordinator
  • Harrison Hays known as render I/O lead: Rhythm & Hues
  • Niles Heckman known as visual effects plate supervisor (as Jon Heckman)
  • Joshua Herrig known as lighting artist
  • Martin Hesselink known as animator
  • Shweta Hirani known as digital compositor
  • Richard Hirst known as Flame artist
  • Austin Hiser known as digital compositor
  • Alan Hodges known as motion capture editor: Giant Studios
  • Phil Holland known as digital imaging specialist
  • Justin Holt known as texture painter: Rhythm & Hues
  • Mark Hopper known as roto artist
  • David Horsley known as computer graphics supervisor
  • David Horsley known as effects animation
  • Bryan Howard known as technical director: Soho VFX
  • Roberto Hradec known as lead shader writer: Image Engine
  • Gerry Hsu known as technical animator
  • Pearl Hsu known as effects technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Steven Hur known as pipeline tech support technical director
  • Sean Hyun-In Lee known as digital compositor: Rhythm & Hues
  • Atsushi Imamura known as visual effects
  • Chris Ingersoll known as flame artist
  • Neeraj Ingle known as background preparation artist
  • Inna Itkin known as lighting
  • Anna Ivanova known as digital effects artist: Soho VFX
  • Lakshmi Subramanian Iyer known as visual effects coordinator
  • Vinita Iyer known as matchmove lead: Rhythm & Hues India
  • Kevin Jackson known as character animator: Rhythm & Hues
  • Virendra Jadhav known as match move technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Babul Jain known as match move technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Jimmy Jewell known as digital compositor
  • Llyr Tobias Johansen known as production assistant
  • Vanessa Joyce known as visual effects coordinator: Rhythm & Hues
  • Zack Judson known as visual effects
  • Mack Kablan known as animator
  • Michael Kambli known as render I/O coordinator
  • Snehal Kanchan known as production coordinator: Rhythm and Hues
  • Rohit Karandadi known as render coordinator
  • Perry Kass known as lead compositor
  • Prabhav Katdare known as digital production coordinator
  • Chris J. Kenny known as digital compositor
  • Josh Kent known as animator
  • Farid Khadiri-Yazami known as technical director: lighting & compositing, Rhythm & hues
  • Filip Kicev known as animator: Soho VFX
  • Chansoo Kim known as character animator: Rhythm & Hues
  • Louis Kim known as compositor: Image Engine
  • Sam Kim known as digital compositor: Rhythm & Hues
  • Bernhard Kimbacher known as compositor: Image Engine
  • Adam King known as lighting technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Paul King known as visual effects coordinator: Image Engine
  • James Kinnings known as animation supervisor: Rhythm & Hues
  • Seth Kleinberg known as compositor: digital opticals: Prologue
  • James G.H. Knight known as motion capture
  • Marta Knudsen known as matte painter: Rhythm & Hues Studios
  • Alex Ko known as character rigging lead: Rhythm & Hues
  • Kim Kotfis known as sequence coordinator: Rhythm & Hues (as Kim Kotfis Horn)
  • Athena Kouverianos known as production manager: Soho VFX
  • Michael Kowalski known as visual effects producer: Soho VFX
  • Robyn Marie Kralik known as digital compositor
  • Aaron Kramer known as lighting artist: Image Engine
  • Varun Krishnan known as matchmove technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Daniel Kruse known as digital lighter: Hydraulx
  • Bill Kunin known as digital compositor
  • Prince Kurian known as roto and paint artist
  • Benjamin Kutsko known as flame artist
  • Sarah Kym known as texture painter
  • Kevin Labanowich known as animator
  • Billy-Vu Lam known as character animator: Hydraulx
  • Ken Lam known as compositor: Image Engine
  • Alex Lama known as compositor: Image Engine
  • Ted Lao known as visual effects assistant coordinator
  • François Laroche known as mocap supervisor: Giant Studios
  • Mark Larranaga known as visual effects supervisor: X1FX
  • David Lauer known as sequence supervisor
  • Jesus Lavin known as compositor: Image Engine
  • Dan Lazarow known as lighting pipeline lead: Rhythm & Hues Studios
  • Tu Le known as lighting technical director: Rhythm and Hues
  • Sam Lee known as compositor: Image Engine
  • Young Lee known as technical animator: Rhythm and Hues
  • Hannah K. Lees known as animation layout: Rhythm & Hues
  • Danny Lei known as modeler: Rhythm & Hues (as Chun Ta Lei)
  • Eric Leidenroth known as motion capture editor: Giant Studios
  • Ilan Leizerovich known as modeler: Soho VFX
  • Paul Lemeshko known as visual effects
  • Rahul Robert Lewis known as matchmove artist
  • Erwin Lievre known as digital compositor
  • Erwin Lievre known as texture artist
  • Matt Linder known as sequence supervisor: Rhythm & Hues Studios
  • Adam Lisagor known as compositor: Hydraulx
  • Russell Lloyd II known as technical animator
  • Matt Logue known as animation supervisor
  • Derick Loo known as animator: Soho VFX
  • Trevor Lorber known as look development
  • Daniel Lu known as lead rigger: Soho VFX
  • Daniel Lu known as modeller: Soho VFX
  • Anthony Mabin known as digital compositing supervisor: Prologue Films
  • Daniel Macarin known as lighting technical director: Rhythm and Hues
  • Alex MacDonald known as motion control operator
  • Matt Madden known as mocap supervisor: Giant Studios
  • Carol Madrigal known as motion capture editor: Giant Studios
  • Allan Magled known as visual effects supervisor
  • Tyler Magled known as production assistant: Soho VFX
  • Philippe Majdalani known as digital intermediate assistant producer
  • Nikki Makar known as lead effects technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Sudip Mallick known as matchmove technical director
  • Doron Man known as digital compositor: Soho VFX
  • Joe Mancewicz known as character rigging supervisor
  • Darshana Mane known as matchmove technical director
  • Shilpesh Mane known as compositor
  • Alex Manita known as simulation/dynamics lead: Soho VFX
  • Vangala Manoj known as modeling technical director
  • Simon Marinof known as digital compositor
  • William H.D. Marlett known as visual effects coordinator
  • Leonardo Martinez known as visual effects: Hydraulx
  • Seth Martiniuk known as digital compositor
  • Shawn Mason known as digital compositor: Rhythm & Hues
  • Greg Massie known as computer graphics sequence supervisor: Image Engine
  • Sarah Mattes known as motion capture technical producer: Giant Studios
  • Jim Maxwell known as digital matte artist: Soho VFX
  • Daniel McCurley known as render coordinator
  • Scott McGinley known as post-viz artist
  • Scott McLain known as Inferno compositor
  • James McPhail known as effects technical director: Image Engine
  • Michael Meagher known as visual effects executive producer
  • Bahador Mehrpouya known as visual effects artist
  • Gagan Mehta known as lead lighting artist: Rhythm & Hues, India
  • Jay Mehta known as rotoscope/background prep artist: Rhythm & Hues
  • Marco Menco known as modeler: Image Engine
  • Jeremy Mesana known as animator: Image Engine
  • Christopher Michael known as technical animator
  • Scott Michelson known as visual effects executive producer
  • Jacob Curtis Miller known as matchmove artist: Image Engine
  • James Michael Miller known as visual effects coordinator
  • Christopher Mills known as animation layout: Rhythm & Hues
  • Mary Milovac known as data coordinator
  • Chirag Mistry known as modeler: Rhythm & Hues, India
  • Mahito Mizobuchi known as post-viz artist
  • Young Joon Mok known as digital compositor
  • Paul V. Molles known as visual effects producer
  • Mike Mombourquette known as digital compositor: Soho VFX
  • Shawn Monaghan known as digital compositor
  • Hailey Moore known as texture artist
  • Rakesh More known as matchmove technical director: Rhythm & Hues, India
  • Meg Morris known as matchmove technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Lucio Moser known as software developer: Image Engine
  • Ken Murano known as motion capture technical supervisor: Giant Studios
  • Bill Murphy known as digital production manager: Rhythm & Hues
  • Connor Murphy known as motion editor
  • Daniel A. Murray known as software engineer
  • Eric Murray known as previs animator: Soho VFX
  • Hailey Murray known as post-production assistant
  • Peter Muyzers known as CG supervisor: Image Engine
  • Peter Muyzers known as visual effects plate supervisor: Image Engine
  • Shakil Nadkarni known as match move technical director: Rhythm and Hues, India
  • Aditi Nagjee known as systems operations
  • Tom Nagy known as animator
  • Rishikesh Nandlaskar known as 3D artist
  • Daniel Naulin known as digital effects artist (as Dan Naulin)
  • Jason Navarro known as systems engineer: Image Engine
  • C. Michael Neely known as lead previs artist
  • Travis Nelson known as rotoscope/paint artist: Rhythm & Hues
  • Chun Seong Ng known as modeler: Hydraulx
  • Thai-My Nguyen known as animator
  • Blake Nickle known as animation coordinator
  • Christopher S. Nielsen known as render coordinator
  • Thomas Nittmann known as visual effects producer: Lola Visual Effects
  • John Norris known as business affairs: The Aaron Sims Company
  • Brian Nugent known as Flame artist
  • Stephen Null known as lead lighting technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Shyam Prasad Chowdhary Nunna known as rotoscope/background prep artist: Rhythm & Hues
  • Ciaran O'Connor known as digital compositor: Soho VFX
  • Carina Ohlund known as sequence lighter
  • Dave Olivares known as effects technical director
  • Kevin Olson known as pipeline technical director: Rhythm & Hues Studios
  • Robert Olsson known as matte painter
  • Tyler Opatrny known as technical animator: Rhythm & Hues
  • Duncan Orthner known as motion control
  • Mihaela Orzea known as lead compositor: Soho VFX
  • Mark Osborne known as lighting technical director
  • Sijo Pappachan known as pipeline technical director: Rhythm and Hues
  • Bruno Parenti known as roto and paint artist: Hydraulx
  • Ken Paris known as technical animator: Rhythm and Hues
  • Elam Parithi known as background prep lead
  • Clark Parkhurst known as Flame artist
  • Zach Parrish known as animator
  • Stephen Parsey known as assistant production coordinator: Rhythm & Hues
  • John Paszkiewicz known as sequence supervisor
  • Sanjit Patel known as software engineer
  • Betsy Paterson known as visual effects supervisor
  • Vishal Pawar known as texture artist: Rhythm & Hues, India
  • Chris Payne known as digital compositor
  • Russell Pearsall known as lead character artist
  • Daniel Perez Ferreira known as senior effects technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Angelica Perez known as digital compositor
  • Jason Petrocelli known as animator
  • Perry Petrzilka known as projectionist: rhythm & hues
  • Long-Hai Pham known as animator
  • Greg Philyaw known as motion capture producer: Giant Studios
  • Joe Phoebus known as effects technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Jaikumar Pillay known as technical animator: Rhythm & Hues Studios, India
  • Tim Pixton known as character animator: Rhythm & Hues
  • John Polyson known as visual effects coordinator: Hydraulx
  • Daniel Post known as digital compositor
  • Tanissa Potrovitza known as postviz coordinator
  • David Pritchard known as visual effects
  • Dante Quintana known as look development lead: Rhythm & Hues
  • Jason Quintana known as technical animator: Rhythm & Hues
  • Chris Radcliffe known as digital artist
  • Scott Rader known as senior inferno artist: Hydraulx
  • Vivek Ram known as modeling technical director: Rhythm and Hues Studios
  • Vasisht Ramachandran known as lighting artist: Soho VFX
  • Erin Ramos known as effects technical director
  • Pavani Rao known as lead lighting technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Shrinidhi Rao known as render support
  • Andres Rascon known as digital compositor: Rhythm & Hues
  • Marina Ratina known as matchmove technical director
  • Aatur Ravani known as lighting technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Raj Mohan Singh Rawat known as roto/prep artist
  • Sunil Rawat known as matchmove technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Farhez Rayani known as look development technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Jorge Razon known as previs / scene setup supervisor: Soho Vfx
  • Greg Reed known as visual effects assistant editor
  • John J. Renzulli known as 3D artist
  • Analeah Ricchetti known as roto/paint artist
  • Jody Rice known as previz coordinator: Pixel Liberation Front
  • Michael Richmond known as i/o vfx support
  • Gizmo Rivera known as compositor
  • Burke Roane known as character animator: Rhythm and Hues
  • Trey Roane known as character animator: Rhythm and Hues
  • Clarence Robello known as post visualization animator (as Boola Robello)
  • Keith Roberts known as animation supervisor
  • Thom Roberts known as character animator: Rhythm & Hues
  • David Robinson known as visual effects digital producer: Rhythm & Hues
  • Cesar Rodriguez Bautista known as compositor: Image Engine
  • Francisco Rodriguez known as effects technical director
  • Patrick J. Rodriguez known as post visualization animator
  • Karl Rogovin known as 3D coordinator: Hydraulx
  • Karl Rogovin known as digital artist: Hydraulx
  • Lad Rohit known as lighting technical director
  • David Rose known as digital compositor: Soho VFX
  • Robert Rowles known as compositor
  • Jonathan Roybal known as previz animator: Pixel Liberation Front
  • Marc Rubone known as lead compositor
  • Diksha Sagar known as match move technical director: Rhythm & Hues, India
  • Saswat Sahoo known as pipeline technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Ai Saimoto known as lighting lead
  • Mayuresh Salunke known as 3D artist
  • Mayuresh Salunke known as modeling technical director
  • Mayur Samant known as matchmove lead
  • David Santiago known as effects supervisor: Rhythm & Hues
  • Dan Santoni known as lighting technical director
  • Matthew Santoro known as visual effects artist
  • Chingkhei Sapam known as pipeline setup
  • Jeffrey Schaper known as visual effects plate producer: Rhythm & Hues
  • Jason Scott known as educator
  • Craig Seitz known as 2D supervisor: Rhythm & Hues
  • Keith Sellers known as sequence lead: Soho VFX
  • Seshaprasad known as digital production manager: Rhythm & Hues, India
  • Joel Sevilla known as animator
  • Laura Sevilla known as digital compositor
  • Behnam Shafiebeik known as digital compositor: Rhythm & Hues
  • Divyesh Shah known as match move technical director: Rhythm & Hues, India
  • Siddharth Shah known as digital compositor: Rhythm & Hues
  • Joel Shaikin known as head of IT: Image Engine
  • Amit Sharma known as background prep lead
  • Neha Sharma known as visual effects coordinator
  • Chad Shattuck known as animation supervisor: Rhythm & Hues
  • Shreya Shetty known as texture painter
  • Stephen Shimano known as systems operator: Rhythm & Hues Studios
  • Shervin Shoghian known as compositing supervisor: Image Engine
  • Matt Shumway known as animation supervisor: Rhythm & Hues
  • Shyamchand known as backgound preparation technical director
  • Peter Sidoriak known as digital compositor
  • Murugan Siju known as paint and roto artist
  • Jason Simmons known as effects technical director: Rhythm and Hues
  • Fred Simon known as systems administrator
  • Mark Simone known as CG production manager: Rhythm & Hues
  • Arjun Singh known as rotoscope/background prep artist: Rhythm & Hues
  • Dhruv Singh known as rotoscope/background prep artist: Rhythm & Hues
  • Karl Sisson known as lighting artist: Image Engine
  • Aaron Skillman known as lead texture painter: Rhythm & Hues
  • Bryan Smeall known as lead compositor: Soho VFX
  • Brad Smith known as render I/O administrator
  • Gregory L. Smith known as post visualisation artist: Pixel Liberation Front
  • Marc Smith known as 3D laser scanning
  • Jakris Smittant known as sequence coordinator
  • Hitesh Solanki known as lighting techical director: Rhythm & Hues Studios India
  • John C. Sparks known as visual effects: Hydraulx
  • Michael Spence known as motion capture
  • Nic Spier known as digital effects artist
  • Ryan Stafford known as visual effects associate producer
  • Christopher Stanczak known as compositor
  • Mark Stanger known as animator
  • Jason Stansell known as character animator
  • Greg Steele known as lighting supervisor: Rhythm & Hues
  • Timothy Steele known as technical animator
  • Frankie Stellato known as animator/modeler
  • Derek Stevenson known as matchmove lead: Image Engine
  • Kemer Stevenson known as character rigger
  • Jennifer Stratton known as texture artist: Rhythm & Hues Studios
  • Colin Strause known as visual effects supervisor
  • Greg Strause known as visual effects supervisor
  • Matthew Stringer known as render coordinator
  • Julien Stuart-Smith known as lighting artist: Image Engine
  • Yuki Sugimoto known as matchmove technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • David Sweeney known as lead compositor: Rhythm & Hues Studios
  • Jeremiah Sweeney known as roto/paint artist
  • Sarah Swick known as production coordinator: Soho VFX
  • Osamu Takehiro known as visual effects
  • Kenny Tam known as modeling supervisor
  • Aashima Taneja known as visual effects coordinator
  • Fatema Tarzi known as effects artist
  • Ben Taylor known as render i/o coordinator
  • Jateen Thakkar known as lead compositor
  • Panat Thamrongsombutsakul known as rigger
  • Chandran Theju known as roto and paint artist
  • Lindsay Thompson known as animator
  • Jeremy Thornhill known as visual effects artist
  • Dan Trezise known as compositor: Rhythm & Hues
  • Tejas Trivedi known as match move technical director
  • Tom Truscott known as compositor: Image Engine
  • Shreya Uchil known as matchmove technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Sourabh Uppal known as lighting technical director
  • Devin Uzan known as digital compositor
  • Richard Van Cleave Jr. known as lead technical animator
  • Ray Van Steenwyk known as animator: Image Engine
  • John Vassallo known as animator
  • Eugene Vendrovsky known as principal graphics scientist
  • Rakesh Venugopalan known as prep artist
  • Parikh Vishal known as look development artist: Rhythm & Hues, India
  • Dominika Waclawiak known as lighting technical director: Rhythm and Hues
  • Zubin Wadia known as effects technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Sean Wallitsch known as Flame artist
  • Shawn Walsh known as visual effects executive producer: Image Engine
  • Brian Walters known as effects technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Kyle Ware known as visual effects coordinator: Hydraulx
  • Sean Wehrli known as main title design & animation: Prologue Films
  • Darrin Wehser known as look development and lighting lead: Rhythm and Hues Studios
  • Chris Wells known as visual effects supervisor
  • Diana Marie Wells known as digital artist (as Diana M. Wells)
  • Jeff Wells known as digital compositor: Rhythm & Hues
  • Jason Wesche known as previsualization artist: Pixel Liberation Front
  • Wil Whaley known as pipeline supervisor
  • C. Jerome Williams known as roto and paint artist: Hydraulx
  • Edson Williams known as visual effects supervisor: Lola Visual Effects
  • Kurt Williams known as visual effects producer
  • Kurt Williams known as visual effects supervisor
  • Mark Williams known as senior research and development programmer: Image Engine
  • Corrina Wilson known as senior compositor: Image Engine
  • Joey Wilson known as modeler: Image Engine
  • Greg Winhall known as modeler: Soho VFX
  • Andrew Winters known as visual effects
  • Steven D. Wolff known as roto/paint artist
  • Samson Sing Wun Wong known as matchmove artist: Image Engine
  • Sunny Wong known as digital compositor
  • Yoshiya Yamada known as modeling supervisor: Hydraulx
  • Gus Yamin known as lighting artist: Image Engine
  • Michael Yazijian known as texture paint supervisor: Rhythm & Hues
  • Nate Yellig known as technical animator
  • Alison Yerxa known as matte painter
  • Robert Young known as digital compositor: Rhythm and Hues
  • Sagar Zade known as modeling technical director: Rhythm & Hues
  • Pouya Zadrafiei known as visual effects artist
  • Anthony Zalinka known as effects technical director: Rhythm and Hues
  • Kai Zhang known as digital compositor: Soho VFX
  • Vera Zivny known as visual effects coordinator: Image Engine
  • Ryan Zuttermeister known as associate visual effects producer: Lola Visual Effects
  • Pascal Chappuis known as Sequence Supervisor (India ) (uncredited)
  • Sun Lee known as matte painter: Hydraulx (uncredited)
  • Thomas Mathai known as data manager (uncredited)
  • Paul Maurice known as Lidar supervisor: Lidar Services (uncredited)
  • Onesimus Nuernberger known as concept artist: Rhythm & Hues (uncredited)

Release Date:

  • Colombia 6 June 2008
  • USA 8 June 2008 (Universal City, California) (premiere)
  • Australia 12 June 2008
  • Greece 12 June 2008
  • Hong Kong 12 June 2008
  • Hungary 12 June 2008
  • Iceland 12 June 2008
  • New Zealand 12 June 2008
  • Portugal 12 June 2008
  • Russia 12 June 2008
  • Singapore 12 June 2008
  • Slovenia 12 June 2008
  • South Korea 12 June 2008
  • Thailand 12 June 2008
  • Brazil 13 June 2008
  • Canada 13 June 2008
  • Estonia 13 June 2008
  • Finland 13 June 2008
  • Guatemala 13 June 2008
  • Ireland 13 June 2008
  • Latvia 13 June 2008
  • Lithuania 13 June 2008
  • Mexico 13 June 2008
  • Norway 13 June 2008
  • Panama 13 June 2008
  • Peru 13 June 2008
  • Philippines 13 June 2008
  • Poland 13 June 2008
  • Romania 13 June 2008
  • Sweden 13 June 2008
  • Taiwan 13 June 2008
  • Turkey 13 June 2008
  • UK 13 June 2008
  • USA 13 June 2008
  • Venezuela 13 June 2008
  • Egypt 18 June 2008
  • Indonesia 18 June 2008
  • Italy 18 June 2008
  • Argentina 19 June 2008
  • Kuwait 19 June 2008
  • Netherlands 19 June 2008
  • India 20 June 2008
  • Pakistan 20 June 2008
  • Spain 20 June 2008
  • Belgium 25 June 2008
  • Israel 26 June 2008
  • Denmark 27 June 2008
  • Switzerland 2 July 2008 (French speaking region)
  • Germany 10 July 2008
  • Austria 11 July 2008
  • Czech Republic 17 July 2008
  • Slovakia 17 July 2008
  • France 23 July 2008
  • Switzerland 31 July 2008 (German speaking region)
  • Japan 1 August 2008
  • China 20 August 2008

MPAA: Rated PG-13 for sequences of intense action violence, some frightening sci-fi images, and brief suggestive content

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Filmography links and data courtesy of The Internet Movie Database


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Posted on March 30, 2012 by Harry in Movies | Tags: , , , .

10 Comments

  1. Nytwolf from Nashville, TN USA
    30 Mar 2012, 5:36 pm

    For those that know only of the original comic book Hulk, the TV seriesHulk, or the regrettable Ang Lee Hulk, you should know that this newversion is a mixture of origins.

    Without spoiling it, one of the larger ingredients in this new Hulkcomes from a Marvel series that is an alternate universe. There aremany differences in the Ultimates Universe. In this version, Banner didnot get his gamma radiation from exposure during an experimental bombexplosion. I won't spoil it, but you can go to http://www.marvel.com and lookunder "Ultimates" if you wish to get the gist of it.

    I can truly say that this version captures a little of everything, sothat no matter what your knowledge is of the Hulk character, there'stie-ins to everything.

    Personally, I felt this reboot was well thought out. It allows for anyfuture connectivity by not limiting it to one version of the Hulk. Thiswill allow future Marvel movie-makers the ability to pick and chooseaspects from the multitude of alternate universes, re-tellings, andtime spans to combine whatever they please.

    This was well cast. When the overall product can make me forget thefact that I don't like a specific actor, and truly appreciate the totalentertainment experience, it's something to smile about. I won'tmention which one I don't care for, since all that will do is sparkuseless debate.

    Story – intricate and intelligent, fast-paced, yet deeply explanatory,complex, yet easily taken in by non-geeks. Enough references to thetrue comic, alternate comic, and TV show, that everyone in the sneakpeek seemed to be pleased. I surely was.

    CGI was great. Don't know why some have to nit-pick, but you can'tplease everyone, I guess. Action was wonderful with plenty of it! Ifyou've ever read one of my reviews, you'll know that I'm a true fan ofoverall entertainment. While I have favorites, I don't base reviews onjust one actor, writer, director, production company, genre, orwhatever. So, if you don't like my opinion, so be it.

  2. Rxblinkboy from United States
    30 Mar 2012, 5:36 pm

    Honestly, as soon as I heard they were making another Hulk movie I wassurprised. When I heard they had cast Ed Norton, I was shocked. Sogoing into this movie I had no idea what to expect. Coming out, I feellike an idiot because it was really masterfully done. Lettier does anamazing job, Norton was fantastic, and as far as a comic book moviegoes, this one is just about on top with little nods and mentions. Ifyou don't walk out of this film screaming HELLL YEAAAA, then you arenot normal. Far better than Ang Lee's attempt at the green man and asfar as this year, it's definitely Marvel's year. No better way to makeup for Spiderman 3 than releasing Iron Man and The Incredible Hulk justa month apart. Thank you Marvel for cleaning the mess Spiderman 3 leftand clearing your name. This film just makes me thing of oneword…AVENGERS

  3. hoove1970 from United States
    30 Mar 2012, 5:36 pm

    I went into this completely blind. I wanted a pure 'experience' I sawONE trailer prior to this screening and closed my eyes while humming. Ihad no idea if this was a second in the series or a re-make.

    I was pleasantly surprised at the (obvious)complete makeover of our biggreen friend, and this was a (P.R.)change for him no doubt… thisdelightful romp will bring him right into the "good guy fold" so tospeak, within the umbrella of the, "Avengers" Franchise that is now aninevitability.

    I thoroughly enjoyed this film, Lots of time on character development,and the intricacies that make you really care for a plot and itscharacters. I thought the acting was very well done although I foundLiv Tyler to be the 'Weak Link'. Not sure she 'sold' her part that wellor maybe it was just typecasting for that "Armageddon" girl.

    The CGI was top shelf. There were no seriously 'over done' moments of,"awww Come on" uttered in the theater. In this packed theater therewere many ovations for the cameo's and the ,"Bad guy gets it" scenes,and even for the thrilling last minute of the movie. So where wasSamuel L. Jackson?

    Please enjoy this more Comic like and more faithful version of THEHULK!

    *** PARENTS*** Go see it! Please do not bring kids under 5 yrs old! itis very realistic and violent. Be a good parent.

  4. femaleanimefan from Ontario, Canada
    30 Mar 2012, 5:36 pm

    I wasn't really sure if I'd like the movie. Ang Lee's version didn'tplease me at all. It didn't have enough action and it had far too muchdialogue. I had never really been a fan of the Hulk comics, but I didlike all the movie adaptations of the Marvel Comics. While I didn'tenjoy The Incredible Hulk as much as Iron Man, it's still great fun,and it will definitely make a big profit at the box office, andhopefully more money than the first did.

    I also must say the cast is a lot better this time around. EdwardNorton is far more convincing as Bruce Banner than Eric Bana was. LivTyler does a good job as Betty, Bruce's girlfriend, though I do likeJennifer Connelly a bit more. The supporting cast is also great, andthey all deserve to at least be nominated for some awards. My favoriteperformance is tied between Norton and Tim Roth.

    Now, to the special effects. Predictably, they are magnificent. Withrecent superhero movies, the effects are always brilliant, and theycertainly adapted the Hulk character more closely to the originalcomics from what I've heard. The action scenes are cool and fun towatch, and fans of the comic books will be on the edge of their seat inexcitement.

    All in all, it's a great movie that comic fans should enjoy, and evenif you don't really read them, you'll still like the movie, as I did.While it's not my favorite superhero movie, it is a whole lot betterthan Ang Lee's version, and a fun time at the theater.

  5. springsunnywinter from United Kingdom
    30 Mar 2012, 5:36 pm

    By the looks of the ending of Ang Lee's Hulk (2003) it seemed thatthere is going to be a sequel. After 5 years we now have The IncredibleHulk which is a reboot like Batman Begins. The reboot was a better ideathan a sequel because Hulk (2003) wasn't a bad movie but wasn't evengreat either and was better off as a one film itself. But if the firstattempt at a Hulk movie left you feeling a little green, good news!This version has a whole new cast, a whole new mood, and even a wholenew retelling of The Hulk's origin

    When I saw the trailer of The Incredible Hulk I was like "Wow thismovie looks cool" and it lived up to my expectation also the trailerdid not give too much away about the plot. The film was outrageouslyentertaining, fun and a perfect popcorn movie. It is the same directorof The Transporter 2 so it is bound to have good action. You can seeevery penny spent from the $130 million budget. It is roughly (notexactly) the same amount as Hulk (2003) and The Incredible Hulk looksmuch, much more expensive.

    The story is about Bruce Banner who is trying to cure is condition thatturns him into a monster but is going to use it as his weapon againstthe Abomination. The plot may seem simple but it is better that waybecause you can just concentrate on the action and the monsters.

    This time the Hulk is more darker and sinister looking and is moremuscular than Ang Lee's Hulk. The Abomination was the icing & cherry onthe cake and I'm glad that they had a proper villain this time. Hisname really does match his personality and he is not wearing anyunderpants, so girls you might want to look away otherwise you mightget a fright. Overall this movie is Incredible not an Abomination.

  6. MovieAddict2011 from UK
    30 Mar 2012, 5:36 pm

    In 2003, Ang Lee's Hulk was released to commercial success – breakingbox office records for a June opening and smashing its way to the topof the box office, it outperformed many analysts' expectations and waswell on its way to becoming one of the biggest comic book films everproduced.

    Then, of course, the negative word of mouth caught up with it – and bythe following weekend it had dropped a colossal 60%. It was quicklyleft floundering in theaters and only turned a profit thanks toworldwide intake.

    Marvel wasn't quite sure what to do – the film's huge opening indicatedan inherent interest in the material, but fans obviously didn't enjoywhat they were seeing.

    Ang Lee's film was, to be fair, admirable in its scope and ambitions –it wasn't your typical comic book action film. But, at the end of theday, most audiences don't want two-and-a-half hour psychologicalexplorations when they go to see a Hulk movie – they want big battlescenes and lots of bruising action, both of which the 2003 Hulk – forthe most part – failed to deliver.

    I count myself among the masses that disliked the 2003 film – notbecause I was a fan of the comics and not because I was disappointed inits treatment of the material; not even because I thought it wasboring, necessarily. I simply thought in spite of its aim to be anintelligent movie, it was quite silly and pretentious – the end fightsequence was appalling, for example. It was a film containing momentsof genius cornered by lots of unnecessary scenes and scenery chewing byNick Nolte.

    So, with this in mind, the ultimate question is: does the 2008 Hulkdeliver on its promise to be bigger, bolder and better? Well, in short,yes – it's still not a great film by any means, and it has its fairshare of flaws (most notably the last twenty minutes which, despite acool battle sequence, go overboard in their destruction), but at theend of the day, it's an entertaining summer blockbuster with a castthat's probably a little better than it deserves.

    Edward Norton would have been my last choice as Bruce Banner – notbecause I think he's bad for the role, but rather because he is such anunexpected choice. Renowned for his anti-mainstream approach tofilm-making and his artistic credibility, his placement in a comic bookfranchise sequel/reboot is puzzling to say the least – it would be likeChristian Bale taking on a role in a Batman or Terminator movie (oh,wait).

    The thing is: Norton delivers a solid performance. I'm not sure if it'sbetter than what Eric Bana tried to achieve (I'd say Bana's performanceis a bit more complex overall), but I think that's partly due to thefilm's length and also because it's so action-packed. For what it'sworth, Norton tries his best to inject some humanity into thecharacter; the whole Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde aspect is more prevalenthere than in the 2003 film. In that movie, Bana's Banner admitted toenjoying the transformation into the Hulk; in 2008, Norton isstruggling to conceal and control it.

    William Hurt replaces Sam Elliot as General Ross, the man responsiblefor Bruce's predicament. The movie is essentially a cat-and-mouse game,with Banner hiding away in Brazil for over a year, until Ross finallydiscovers his location – prompting Bruce to flee back to North Americain a last-ditch effort to find a cure for his "disease." He reuniteswith Ross' daughter, Betty (Liv Tyler), and finds himself at odds withan overzealous combatant named Blonsky (played by Tim Roth), whoeventually transforms into Abomination.

    My problems with the film are most present in the latter half. Thefirst 45 minutes is a lot of fun and is rather cleverly made – thefight scenes are engaging and Roth establishes his anti-hero villain.But suddenly halfway through the movie, Blonsky turns into anunmotivated cliché of a bad guy, and by the end of the film you loseall care and understanding for the character. Once he transforms intothe Abomination and goes on a citywide rampage in search of an equalfoe (in this case, the Hulk), his reasons are puzzling.

    This is where the film truly falls apart, because suddenly General Rossis responsible for millions of dollars' worth of damage and civiliancasualties (without spoiling any surprises, he is responsible forBlonsky's transformation), and he's flying around in an Army helicopterfollowing the city's destruction, but nobody really seems to care. Henever loses his job, even after he tears up a college campus in searchof the Hulk earlier in the film. It may be pointless to criticize acomic book film for lapses in logic, but since the film strives for asense of realism in its early scenes, the switch to excess halfwaythrough is a bit disheartening. The 2003 Hulk had the same problems,incidentally – I'm wondering if it's a flaw of the comic book or justthe character itself; perhaps it's too hard to retain realism whenyou've got a 12-foot giant green dude destroying everything in sight.

    If I'm being too critical, it's only because I enjoyed the film andregretted these aspects. At the end of the day, it's a fun,entertaining summer blockbuster — and that's really all it needed tobe.

  7. DICK STEEL from Singapore
    30 Mar 2012, 5:36 pm

    The crowded streets and cluttered housing on the streets of Rio DeJaneiro provided some reminiscence of Jackie Chan's Police Story, whereyou could be sure of a chase scene zig- zagging the streets to takeadvantage of the wonderful opportunities presented for an exhilaratingchase. And Leterrier doesn't try not to provide action junkies plentyof action- smashing moments as we root for Bruce Banner to hulk up,unfortunately of course, to satisfy our lust for some unadulteratedaction where everything in the way of the Hulk, gets smashed. Howeverthose expecting action from the get go will be disappointed, as therewere only a small handful of action sequences, though of course theyinclude the classic moments that comic fans had been baying for since 4years ago. So I guess most will be left happy as we see some niftymoves by the Hulkster, which will leave a smile on your face, despitebeing used in limited doses. But I note though that the story cumaction, looked a little bit like Superman II with the seeking of a cureand the deliberate loss of power to be with the lady love, and theduking out between super-beings on equal footing (here beinggamma-powered), with a tinge of Cloverfield like moments too.

    While there will be those who will gripe about the transformationmainly done in the dark and in shadows, it does prove to be effectivein building some anticipation and heigntened tension as to when he willfinally appear in full glory. The mainly military attacks on the bigguy again brought out some back to basics adversary with ThunderboltRoss trying to capture the Hulk, and in fact I'd appreciate that thismovie didn't divert too much away from this primary objective, althoughit might be more of the same from the first movie. But while the Hulkhas an aura of invulnerability, somehow The Incredible Hulk provided meat least, an emotional pang when he gets hurt bad, as we remember thatthis is a guy who just plainly wants to be left alone. And the angrierthe Hulk gets, the bigger and more powerful he becomes too.

    And it's not all serious here too, with well meaning humour peppered inthe right places, making numerous references to the television seriesand characters from the Marvel universe. You'd often wonder how hispants stay on before-during-and-after transformation, well, it getsaddressed here with humour. Memorable ines such as "don't-make-me-angry-you-wouldn't-like-me-when-I'm-angry" gets punned away,even the late Bill Bixby got a cameo, together with Lou Ferrigno whoreprises his security guard role, and Stan Lee who's possibly in themost unmemorable cameo appearance ever. The much touted Tony Starkappearance will bring whoops of joy from newly converted fans of RobertDowney Jr, while I suspect in line with the rumoured Avengers movie,the universe now seemed more streamlined again with the references toSHIELD, and stupid me thinking that Mr Fantastic would somewhat befeatured in this too. A WWII super soldier project and serum wasreferenced and formed the basis for Tim Roth's Emil Blonsky turnedAbomination, but Captain America? I'll leave that to you to find out.

    But what I really liked about The Incredible Hulk is not the actionsequences, nor the references mentioned made. It was the central lovestory between Bruce Banner and Betty Ross. In Lee Ang's version, wedon't see much of the romance between Bana and Connelly because thestory didn't really call for it, save for a rescue scene, and at anin-juncture where the Hulk was stopped in his tracks by his lady love.And that was precisely the winner for me. The Hulk, for all his powerand unstoppable rage, could be brought under control by his lady love,and that was used to great effect here. Beneath the greeninvulnerability lies the heart of a mild-mannered man who yearns to bewith the love of his life, but unfortunately cannot due to the cursethat Fate had brought upon him. Both Norton and Tyler managed to bringout this chemistry of lovers torned apart, one who can only admire theother from afar, and the other finally never wanting to let go ofsomeone who had disappeared from her life for her own protection. Andthis version of Betty does sport a bit of a temper and feisty too, andis not really your classic damsel in distress.

    Granted that most supporting characters were rather one-dimensional,The Incredible Hulk somehow managed to straddle between its intensewhack-all-destroy-all moments, and tender ones when the lovers are leftalone to their own devices. As with the Marvel movies to date, thedoors are left wide opened for follow ups and team-ups, and here thereare no less than three avenues where the next story could developfurther from, and sowed the seed for other movie franchises to bedeveloped too. It drained a little bit from the cerebral department inorder to amplify the romance, and let the action go into overdrive.HUlk Smash indeed, this time likely to make a huge dent at the boxoffice, for fans and non-fans alike to be won over, just like how IronMan did.

  8. ramasscreen.com from United States
    30 Mar 2012, 5:36 pm

    Take a deep breath when you enter the cinema to see this one becauseit's just downright breathtaking. THE INCREDIBLE HULK is an amazingsummer blockbuster movie. This reboot has made Ang Lee's Hulk back in2003 seem like it never existed. Edward Norton's version portrays whatHulk is supposed to be… on the big screen. Do not bootleg this one, donot wait til it hit DVD, Go watch it in the theaters because Iguarantee you it is worth every penny. This movie is spectacular andsuperb in every way. It's a rock 'em smash 'em, jaw dropping thrillride.

    Let's just start with the acting, what a perfect cast ensemble. EdwardNorton is a better Bruce Banner than Eric Bana because Edward looksmore convincing as a skinny nerd scientist. He embodies the pain andthe struggle that his character has to go through. Always running,always hiding, always trying to come up with ways to get rid of themonster in him. William Hurt and Tim Roth have no problem being the badguys, having played so many other bad guys in many other movies in thepast. Tim Blake Nelson giving us hints that he'll become the next archnemesis The Leader is pretty cool. Liv Tyler is so damn cute. That girlcan melt your heart.

    Now to the best part. The category that makes this movie a winner isits awesome CGI visual effects. Bravo to the brains behind thisbrilliant technological accomplishment. When Hulk breaks a cop car intohalf and uses each part as boxing globes, that's just plain badass! Theimages are so much better and more believable,.. the timing could nothave been more right to revamp this character. The storyline helps usunderstand the characters and their development as they progress but itwastes no time at all on any boring moment.

    Magnificent stuntwork as well, especially the chase scene in the smalltown in Brazil. The whole jumping from one roof to another at highspeed with bodies bumping into walls or falling down from aconsiderable height. I have much respect for the stunt people who broketheir bones daily for this movie.

    The story has three main long action packed sequences and the lastfight scene is just phenomenal. They weren't kidding when they saidthat it would last for 26 minutes. Hulk punches Abomination,Abomination, kicks Hulk, Hulk strangles Abomination, Abomination slamsHulk onto a couple of buildings.. Your inner kid will be happy.

    All the elements of this movie have but one purpose only… to entertainyour senses to the fullest extent. Your sight and hearing will betreated with the utmost incredible experience of your lifetime. Youwill find yourself cheering at how great this movie is.

    The cameo by Stan Lee and Lou Ferrigno, who plays Hulk in the old TVseries are memorable. The plot also has some punch lines here and therethat are silly funny but effective. I'm glad Lou Ferrigno got to voicethe Hulk because I can't think of anyone else more perfect for the job.The movie even includes the main theme song from the old TV seriesstarring the late Bill Bixby. What a heartfelt nostalgic tribute.

    The teaser at the end when Tony Stark meets Gen. Thunderbolt Ross, thatpart is a show stopper. Director Louise Leterrier and his crew deservesa standing ovation for successfully making an excellent superhero moviewhich some people thought was going to be as bad as the first Hulkmovie. Well, Louise has proved them wrong. Summer 2008 may quitepossibly be the best summer movie season ever.

  9. schristian-6 from United States
    30 Mar 2012, 5:36 pm

    I attended a sneak preview of The Incredible Hulk last night.Incredible? No, but Very Good. And it washes the bad taste left in mymouth from Indiana Jones and the Big Letdown. The story is good, theacting is awesome. Ed Norton is the perfect person to play thetormented Bruce Banner. He is more believable in the roll than EricBana. Liv Tyler is very good as Betty Ross (formally played by thetasty Jennifer Connelly) William Hurt as General Ross is impressive andmakes for a worthy adversary to Bruce Banner. If I had to come up witha negative, it would be Tim Roth. While I really like him, and healways plays great villains, I feel he's just miss cast here. He seemstiny next to General Ross. Instead of coming off like the English badass special op he's supposed to be, he comes off more like a jerk withNapoleon Syndrome. Someone more physically imposing like Vinnie Jones(Bullet tooth from Snatch), or Daniel Craig (the new Bond) would havebeen more convincing for the part. But I'm just picking here. The movieis a joy. Great action. No long boring, dragging development stuff thatthe first Hulk had in spades. There are some very nice cameos as well.Some were a surprise, some were not. I didn't see Nick Fury anywhereexcept in a brief headline in a montage. However I did not remainthrough the credits, so there might have been a scene at the end likeIron Man that I don't know about. I give it ***1/2 out of ****. I alsopredict it to make 80+million this weekend when it opens to the publicand should "Hulk Smash" the competition. The movie received an ovationfrom the audience at the end which sums it up. A worthy movie made forthe fans and everyone else.

  10. YoSafBridge from United States
    30 Mar 2012, 5:36 pm

    Three cheers for Marvel for finally realizing that no one knows theirmaterial better then themselves. May they never sell another belovedsuperhero to a lesser being again.

    For the second time this summer Marvel has given us a superhero moviethat just plain rocks. With the exact right amount of humour, characterdevelopment and great action sequences, the Incredible Hulk is up therewith Iron Man as one of my favourite films to be released so far in thesummer movie season. While I didn't like it quite as much as Iron Man(Robert Downey WAS Tony Stark. Whereas something still doesn't sitright about Edward Norton as Bruce…) it was nevertheless a great,faithful adaptation of the comic books. Plus the cameo appearances byboth Stan Lee and Robert Downey Jr where terrific! Possibly myfavourite Stan Lee cameo yet.

    There isn't really much else to say besides, go see it for yourselves.If you're a fan of the comics, or just of fun popcorn films you'lldefinitely enjoy this one.

    8/10

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