The Edge of Love (2008) Poster

The Edge of Love (2008)

  • Rate: 6.2/10 total 7,244 votes 
  • Genre: Biography | Drama | Romance | War
  • Release Date: 20 June 2008 (UK)
  • Runtime: 110 min
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The Edge of Love (2008)

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  • IMDb page: The Edge of Love (2008)
  • Rate: 6.2/10 total 7,244 votes 
  • Genre: Biography | Drama | Romance | War
  • Release Date: 20 June 2008 (UK)
  • Runtime: 110 min
  • Filming Location: Aldwych Underground Station, Aldwych, Holborn, London, England, UK
  • Gross: $28,635(USA)(5 April 2009)
  • Director: John Maybury
  • Stars: Keira Knightley, Sienna Miller and Matthew Rhys
  • Original Music By: Angelo Badalamenti   
  • Soundtrack: Blue Tahitian Moon
  • Sound Mix: Dolby Digital
  • Plot Keyword: Poet | Jealousy | Wales | Infidelity | Courtroom

Writing Credits By:

  • Sharman Macdonald (written by)

Known Trivia

  • The screenwriter is Keira Knightley’s mother.
  • Lindsay Lohan was originally attached to play the role of Caitlin, but dropped out shortly before filming began.
  • Sharman Macdonald wrote the role of Caitlin with Keira Knightley in mind, but Keira chose to play Vera instead.
  • Keira Knightley does all of her own singing in the film. She worked with vocal coach Claire Underwood to prepare for the film.
  • Producer Rebekah Gilbertson is the granddaughter of the real people played by Keira Knightley and Cillian Murphy in the film.
  • The film’s title is subtly shown, in part, throughout the film in various places. Most noticeably after we see Caitlin’s affair it appears as a silhouette on the curtain.
  • The interior of the Newquay “The Black Lion” was shot in “The Black Lion” in Cardigan. The pub has since shut due to the smoking ban.

Goofs: Anachronisms: When William Killick boards his transportation plane to Greece the C-47 Dakota shows "D-Day stripes" (aka "Invasion stripes") on fuselage and left wing. Historically and consistent with the period setting of the story – the "Blitz" – this must have been in spring 1941. However, these markings were not in use before June 1944.

Plot: Two feisty, free-spirited women are connected by the brilliant, charismatic poet who loves them both. Full summary »  »

Story: Two feisty, free-spirited women are connected by the brilliant, charismatic poet who loves them both. The passion and pathos of legendary poet Dylan Thomas is told through the lives of two extraordinary women. Vera Phillips and Dylan were teenage loves; fast forward ten years and the two reconnect in London. She's working as a singer whilst he's churning out scripts for government propaganda films and living off the last in a long line of infatuated women. The two former lovers feel the thunderbolt once more, but Thomas is now married to the adventurous Caitlin. Despite their love-rival status, the women form a surprising friendship. Caitlin indulges in her own infidelities, and recognises a similar adventurous spirit in her husband. But she knows his connection with Vera is something different, not to mention dangerous. Romantic turmoil continues in Vera's life. She marries her devoted admirer William Killick…Written by paul@keiraweb.com  

Synopsis

Synopsis: The story is based loosely on real events and people. During World War II, Vera Phillips (Keira Knightley) runs into her first love, charismatic Welsh poet Dylan Thomas (Matthew Rhys), and their feelings for each other are renewed, despite that Dylan is now married to the spirited Caitlin MacNamara (Sienna Miller). Despite their rivalry, the two women become friends and the trio have happy times together. When Vera marries soldier William Killick (Cillian Murphy), Dylan becomes jealous at the addition of him to the group, and Caitlin notices. But William is soon deployed abroad, and the remaining trio moves to the Welsh countryside, where Vera’s feelings for Dylan intensify. When William comes home from the war, his jealousy compounded by his traumatic experiences explodes and he shoots up the house Dylan is staying in.

 

FullCast & Crew

Produced By:

  • David Bergstein known as executive producer
  • Paul Brett known as executive producer
  • Rebekah Gilbertson known as producer
  • Bill Godfrey known as co-producer
  • Nick Hill known as executive producer
  • Linda James known as executive producer
  • Huw Penallt Jones known as co-producer (as Huw Penallt-Jones)
  • Hannah Leader known as executive producer
  • Joe Oppenheimer known as executive producer
  • Sarah Radclyffe known as producer
  • Tim Smith known as executive producer
  • Lesley Stewart known as line producer
  • David M. Thompson known as executive producer
  • Anna Webster known as associate producer

FullCast & Crew:

  • Simon Armstrong known as Wilfred Hosgood
  • Ben Batt known as Sergeant
  • Geoffrey Beevers known as Registrar
  • Rachel Bell known as Midwife
  • Paul Brooke known as Mr. Justice Singleton
  • Huw Ceredig known as John Patrick
  • Richard Clifford known as Alistair Graham
  • Richard Dillane known as Lt Col David Talbot Rice
  • Joel Dommett known as Train Soldier
  • Rachel Essex known as Mel
  • Craig Gallivan known as Sailor Beating Dylan
  • Callum Godfrey known as Boy on Train
  • Simon Kassianides known as Partisan
  • Keira Knightley known as Vera Phillips
  • Anne Lambton known as Anita Shenkin
  • Raymond Llewellyn known as Dewi Ianthe (as Ray Llewellyn)
  • Alastair Mackenzie known as Anthony Devas
  • Neville Malcolm known as Big Joe
  • Sienna Miller known as Caitlin Thomas
  • Cillian Murphy known as William Killick
  • Acacia Pattison Biggs known as Rowatt Aged 1 Month
  • Bethany Towell known as Rowatt Aged 1 Month
  • Jonny Phillips known as John Eldridge
  • Kyle Redmond-Jones known as Boy Soldier
  • Matthew Rhys known as Dylan Thomas
  • Leo Robertson known as Rowatt Aged 8 Months
  • Olivia Robertson known as Rowatt Aged 8 Months
  • Jenny Runacre known as Woman in Yellow Dress
  • Camilla Rutherford known as Nicolette
  • Lisa Stansfield known as Ruth Williams
  • Diego Stephens known as Llewellyn
  • Lanark Stephens known as Llewellyn
  • Nick Stringer known as PC Williams
  • Suggs known as The Crooner
  • Karl Johnson known as Dai Fred (uncredited)
  • Anthony O'Donnell known as Jack Lloyd (uncredited)
  • Kent Olesen known as Soldier (uncredited)
  • Matthew Rose known as Soldier (uncredited)
  • Simon John Wilson known as US G.I. / English Soldier (uncredited)

..

 

Supporting Department

Makeup Department:
  • Catherine Davies known as crowd hair
  • Catherine Davies known as crowd makeup supervisor: Wales
  • Louise Fisher known as makeup artist
  • Joe Hopker known as hair stylist
  • Joe Hopker known as makeup artist
  • Lizzie Lawson known as crowd makeup supervisor: London (as Lizzi Lawson)
  • Kristyan Mallett known as special effects makeup designer
  • Daniel Phillips known as hair designer
  • Daniel Phillips known as makeup designer
  • Tapio Salmi known as hair supervisor
  • Tapio Salmi known as makeup supervisor

Art Department:

  • Graham Caulfield known as drapesmaster
  • Graham Caulfield known as upholstery
  • Sophia Chowdhury known as assistant set decorator
  • Kelvin Cook known as dressing props
  • Gary Dawson known as dressing props
  • Katie Driscoll known as graphic designer
  • John Greaves known as storyboard artist
  • Bryan Griffiths known as rigger
  • Josh Jones known as stand-by carpenter
  • Tina Jones known as set dresser
  • Hannah Moseley known as draughtsman
  • Allen J. Polley known as property master
  • Mark Reynolds known as chargehand dressing prop
  • Emma Saunders known as art department assistant
  • Anna Thomas known as art department assistant
  • Greg Winter known as scenic artist
  • Paul Couch known as stand-by painter (uncredited)
  • Thomas Jones known as mold maker (uncredited)

..

 

Company

Production Companies:

  • BBC Films
  • Capitol Films
  • Prescience Film Fund
  • Prescience
  • Rainy Day Films
  • Sarah Radclyffe Productions Limited
  • Wales Creative IP Fund

Other Companies:

  • De Lane Lea  post-production facilities
  • ARRI Lighting Rental  lighting
  • Casting Collective  extras casting
  • Hothouse Music  music supervisor
  • Kodak  motion picture film supplied by
  • Movie Lot, The  security
  • PMA Production  behind the scenes provided by
  • Pinewood Studios  movie studio
  • Pivotal Post  Avid HD Editing Equipment Provided By
  • Sapex Scripts  post-production services
  • UCJ  soundtrack
  • UK Computamatch  negative cutting

Distributors:

  • Belga Films (2008) (Belgium) (theatrical)
  • Capitol Films (2009) (USA) (theatrical)
  • Hoyts Distribution (2008) (New Zealand) (theatrical)
  • Imagem Filmes (2009) (Brazil) (theatrical)
  • Independent Films (2008) (Netherlands) (theatrical)
  • Lionsgate Australia (2008) (Australia) (theatrical)
  • Lionsgate (2008) (UK) (theatrical)
  • MEED Films (2008) (Lithuania) (theatrical) (Baltic states)
  • Neue Visionen Filmverleih (2009) (Germany) (theatrical)
  • Top Film (2009) (Russia) (theatrical)
  • Village Films (2008) (Greece) (theatrical)
  • Image Entertainment (2009) (USA) (DVD)
  • Image Entertainment (2009) (USA) (DVD) (Blu-ray)
  • Lionsgate (2008) (UK) (DVD)
  • Prorom Media-Trade (2008) (Romania) (all media)
  • Warner Home Video (2009) (Netherlands) (DVD)

..

 

Other Stuff

Special Effects:

  • Double Negative (visual effects)
  • Kristyan Mallett Fx (makeup effects)

Visual Effects by:

  • Louie Alexander known as digital compositor: Framestore-CFC
  • Christopher Anciaume known as matchmove artist: Double Negative
  • Bacsó Anna known as roto/prep artist: Cube Effects
  • Szvák Antal known as visual effects coordinator: Cube Effects
  • Jaume Arteman known as digital compositor: double negative
  • Szapek Attila known as compositor: Cube Effects
  • Ben Baker known as head of digital lab: Framestore CFC
  • Matthew Baker known as retouch and restoration: Framestore-CFC
  • Adrian Banton known as senior compositor: Double Negative
  • Zoltán Benyó known as visual effects producer: Cube Effects
  • Rodrigo Bernardo known as systems engineer
  • Zachary Bloom known as scanning and recording: Framestore CFC
  • Turea Blyth known as visual effects editorial: Framestore
  • Clare Brody known as digital intermediate: data operator
  • Nik Brownlee known as digital compositor: Double Negative
  • Paul Burke known as scanning and recording: Framestore
  • Andy Burrow known as scanning & recording manager
  • Vajda Bálint known as roto/prep artist: Cube Effects
  • Francesca Canducci known as retouch and restoration: Framestore-CFC
  • Ana Mestre de Almeida Pereira known as roto/prep artist: Double Negative (as Ana Mestre)
  • Jerome Dewhurst known as engineer: Framestore CFC
  • Laboncz Edina known as roto/prep artist: Cube Effects
  • Richard Edwards known as data operator: Framestore CFC
  • Péter Farkas known as lead digital compositor: Cube Effects
  • Tamás Fiedler known as digital artist: Cube Effects
  • Julian Foddy known as digital artist: Double Negative
  • André Gabriella known as roto/prep artist: Cube Effects
  • Papp Gabriella known as roto/prep artist: Cube Effects
  • Joe Godfrey known as conform editor: Framestore CFC
  • Azzard Gordon known as digital matchmove artist: Double Negative
  • Pete Hanson known as studio manager: double negative
  • Jeremy Hardin known as digital artist: Double Negative
  • Adam Hawkes known as title compositor
  • Karsten Hecker known as film mastering engineer: Framestore CFC
  • Bence Hegybíró known as digital artist: Cube Effects
  • Jan Hogevold known as executive producer: Framestore CFC
  • Lee Ifans known as visual effects editor: Double Negative
  • Karászi Ildikó known as visual effects coordinator: Cube Effects
  • Horváth Gál István known as roto/prep artist: Cube Effects
  • Vajda István known as compositor: Cube Effects
  • Yan Jennings known as film mastering engineer
  • Pál Klemm known as 2D supervisor: Cube Effects
  • Éva Korda known as roto/prep artist: Cube Effects
  • Dávid Kozma known as compositor: Cube Effects
  • Brian Krijgsman known as colourist: Framestore CFC
  • Katalin Kriskó known as digital artist: Cube Effects
  • Károly Körmöczi known as roto/prep artist: Cube Effects
  • Esme Long known as production assistant: Framestore CFC
  • James Long known as data operator: Framestore CFC
  • Kevin Lowery known as color management supervisor
  • Veronica Marcano known as scanning and recording operator: Framestore
  • Jan Maroske known as digital compositor: Double Negative
  • Gurel Mehmet known as digital matte painter: Double Negative
  • Miklós Mesterházy known as digital artist: Cube Effects
  • John Moffatt known as visual effects supervisor
  • Mike Morrison known as digital intermediate producer: Framestore CFC
  • Erzsébet Nemes known as roto/prep artist: Cube Effects
  • Papp Nikolett known as digital artist: Cube Effects
  • Fábry Olivia known as roto/prep artist: Cube Effects
  • Kate Phillips known as visual effects producer
  • Lee Rankin known as scanning and recording: Framestore CFC
  • Tamás Ravasz known as digital artist: Cube Effects
  • James Reed known as scanning and recording
  • Jimmy Saul known as scanning and recording operator
  • Dan Snape known as digital compositor: Double Negative
  • Nick Stanley known as retouch and restoration: Framestore CFC
  • Zoltán Szegedi known as senior digital compositor: Cube Effects
  • Gábor Székely known as technical director: Cube Effects
  • Ria Tamok known as senior digital compositor: Cube Effects
  • Pál Tauszig known as digital compositor: Cube Effects
  • Melissa Taylor known as visual effects executive producer
  • Odean Thompson known as digital paint artist: restoration: Framestore
  • Jenõ Udvardi known as visual effects producer: Cube Effects
  • Simon Wessely known as data operator: Framestore CFC
  • Péter Zavorszky known as visual effects production manager: Cube Effects
  • Fiedler Zoltán known as digital artist: Cube Effects
  • Németh Ádám known as digital artist: Cube Effects
  • Taz Lodder known as technical support: Double Negative (uncredited)

Release Date:

  • France 15 May 2008 (Cannes Film Market)
  • UK 18 June 2008 (Edinburgh Film Festival) (premiere)
  • Ireland 20 June 2008 (Dublin)
  • UK 20 June 2008
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina 18 August 2008 (Sarajevo Film Festival)
  • Australia 21 August 2008
  • Hong Kong 28 August 2008
  • France 2 October 2008 (Dinard Festival of British Cinema)
  • New Zealand 2 October 2008
  • Belgium 8 October 2008 (Gent International Film Festival)
  • Lithuania 10 October 2008
  • Hungary 6 November 2008
  • Romania 21 November 2008
  • Belgium 26 November 2008
  • Italy 29 November 2008 (Turin Film Festival)
  • USA 13 March 2009 (limited)
  • Greece 26 March 2009
  • Portugal 14 May 2009
  • Germany 23 July 2009
  • Netherlands 11 August 2009 (DVD premiere)
  • Kazakhstan 13 August 2009
  • Russia 13 August 2009
  • Brazil 25 September 2009 (Rio de Janeiro International Film Festival)
  • Brazil 23 October 2009 (São Paulo International Film Festival)
  • Brazil 8 January 2010
  • Spain 30 April 2010

MPAA: Rated R for some sexuality, language and disturbing war images

..

 
 

Filmography links and data courtesy of The Internet Movie Database


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Posted on March 30, 2012 by Harry in Movies | Tags: , , , , .

10 Comments

  1. seawalker from Birmingham, England
    30 Mar 2012, 3:28 pm

    With the shadow of La Knightely looming large, I really wanted "TheEdge Of Love" to be another "Atonement" – a big, beautiful looking,poetic wartime romance – but it wasn't. Do not get me wrong, there aremany good things in "The Edge Of Love". It just did not touch my heartthe way that "Atonement" did.

    The acting is uniformly fine. Tabloid darlings Keira Knightley, andSienna Miller especially, proved that their performances in "Atonement"and "Factory Girl" respectively were no flash in the pan. They wereboth excellent. Cillian Murphy is also good as Keira Knightley's wartraumatised husband and Matthew Rhys got to the heart of theindifferent, drunken, selfish chancer that was Dylan Thomas.

    "The Edge Of Love" looks fantastic. Contrast and compare thecinematography of the 'London during the blitz' setting of the firsthalf with the bleakness of the Welsh coastal town of the second half.The first half of the film presents almost a fantasy world: Dreamy andjust out of focus. Smoky pubs, soft lighting and shadows. The secondhalf of the film presents a hard reality: Harsh pebble beaches and wideopen spaces. Rain, grass, pain and small town mediocrity. In the formerromance flourishes amid the cigarette smoke and the alcohol; in thelatter romance fractures, and there will be a reckoning for badbehaviour.

    (I will say at this juncture that most critics have written that thefilm loses it's heart when it moves out of London. I disagree. I thinkthe film becomes real and true once it moves to Wales. The second halfis my favourite half of the film.)

    But sadly, and whisper this very quietly, "The Edge Of Love" is just alittle bit too dull. Mood movies, and "The Edge Of Love" is definitelya mood movie, have to walk a very fine line between immersion inatmosphere and the demands of plot to keep the punters interested. Toooften "The Edge Of Love" falls into the former. It needed more story.

    Not a bad film, just one that could have been better.

  2. Chinarose77 from United Kingdom
    30 Mar 2012, 3:28 pm

    Naturally, before watching this film, ones expectations are high. Thetale of Dylan Thomas and his lovers promises to be exhilarating. Thestars used in the production hold high promise. However the result isdifferent. There is just something not quite right about this film.

    Whilst it manages to capture the viewer with moments of cinematicbeauty, The Edge of Love fails to entice. In some scenes thecinematography is perfect. The set design and costume cannot befaulted. The glamour and horror of the era are portrayed perfectly. Butthe story itself does not piece together. The sudden friendship of thetwo women seems too soon and lacking in explanation. The charactershave little depth and I felt no real sympathy for any of them. Italmost seems as if several crucial scenes were omitted.

    The film itself is fairly disappointing, but perhaps worth watching forthe moments when everything comes together because when this happensthe film is stunning.

  3. anon_is_good from Edinburgh, Scotland
    30 Mar 2012, 3:28 pm

    I went to see this as the Edinburgh Film Festival the other day and Ihave to say I was a bit disappointed.

    The score and the cinematography were lush and gorgeous and the actingwas very good but the script lacked characterisation. I realise thatDylan Thomas was not meant to have been an overly pleasant man, but Ifailed to see why the seemingly likable, headstrong character of VeraPhillips ever fell in love with him. He came across as completelyselfish and sleazy with virtually no redeeming qualities and itfrustrated me that there seemed to be no explanation for every womanfawning over him. Characters made choices out of the blue andeventually I just grew to dislike all the characters I have loved inthe first half.

    What also grated about this film is that sometimes I swear I could havebeen watching 'Atonement' the amount of time Keira Knightley said "Comeback to me." I really hope she wasn't trying to relive the glory of'Atonement' through this film because I am afraid she will be sorelydisappointed. Even though I personally did not enjoy 'Atonement' I canrecognise that it is a marvellous film and sadly "The Edge of Love"just cannot compare.

  4. jennymurphy1990 from United Kingdom
    30 Mar 2012, 3:28 pm

    So keira knightly is in it…So automatically we compare this film toattonement. Aside rom the fact that this film is also wartime and herappearance is uncanning, these films are totally different.

    The Actors work well, i think one good thing is there is no memorableperson, they are a team.

    If you want a film where things happen, then id advise another as thestory of this film is about human interaction and their physche'sdamaged by their experiences and how their lives are intertwined.

    This film have genuine interaction, perfect pause moments that make youhold your breath. No its not exciting, but it is gripping if you canempathise with these characters. At moments i wondered if this film mayhave been better as a theatrical play rather than a movie. We expect alot from movies as everything is possible, and yet with theatre weallow for interaction and rely on belief.

    There are things wrong with it if your looking for a blockbuster, ifyou look for nothing and allow the film to take you in, move you, allowyourself to forget these stars, and not to judge them as actors but letthem become people, you will truly ind yourself moved.

    GO ON!! give it a go!

  5. Chris_Docker from Scotland, United Kingdom
    30 Mar 2012, 3:28 pm

    Can you capture the moment? When first you hear rain on a roof? Somethings are beyond the sum of their parts, expressing the poetry oflife. The things that matter.

    Poet Dylan Thomas captured the seemingly inexpressible "A good poemhelps to . . . extend everyone's knowledge, of himself and the worldaround him." (Bob Dylan named himself after him). So why has it takenso long to make a film of the great Dylan Thomas? A simple biopic couldhave missed the point. Writer Sharman Macdonald has taken a different,better approach.

    In The Edge of Love, she creates the world of passions and complexitiesthat fill the poems so we can swim in them. The lives of four friends.Dylan, who lusts and loves to the full. Wife Caitlin (Sienna Miller),his feisty support. War-hero William (Cillian Murphy), who saves himfrom a street brawl. And then there's his childhood sweetheart. Vera.Dear Vera. Take your breath away Vera. She's Caitlin's closest friend.William's wife. And, like a muse, the 'star' in Dylan's dark sky.

    It all kicks off in the 1940 London Blitz, with bomb shelters in theUnderground. Enter Vera (an impressive Keira Knightley) under makeshiftstage spotlights. She meets Dylan for the first time again in years,her heart is flushed. Their eyes shine through the smoke of the room.The purity of their former passion. Dylan (native Welsh-speaker,Matthew Rhys) is no sanctified, sanitised poet. Master of his vices hemust experience them all fully. He introduces his beloved wife thencontinues to woo Vera.

    The Edge of Love is a visual treat. The soundtrack leaves you wantingfor more. Performances are possibly the best by these actors in theircareers. As a lush love story it's pretty good. As an insight intoDylan Thomas and the reality of poetry in all our lives, not bad atall. And as a tribute to a great man, inspiring.

    The production has been at pains to project the spirit of Dylan Thomaswithout compromising historical accuracy too much. Dramatic tensioninvolves a pull between artistic freedom and conventional morality.Audiences looking for an experience based on the latter may bedisappointed. And it will play less well to audiences whose boundariesare those of Albert Square.

    Sharman Macdonald seemed aware of the headstrong nature of artisticfreedom and its limits when she spoke to producer Rebekah Gilbertson(granddaughter of the real William and Vera). "Think of all the thingsthat you don't want me to write about," she said," because I have tohave carte blanche." For Macdonald, the limits were if she should causeoffence to Dylan's memory. But for many artists, especially men, thelimits are those which wife and family could set on them. A woman isnot going to let lofty ideals interfere with practical common senseissues, and will even put her children's interests before her own (Thisoccasionally happens the other way round, as when towering geniusVirginia Woolf refused to let loving Leonard bring her down to earth -in The Hours).

    In spite of the tension between Caitlin and Vera, these two womenbecome closest buddies. It is one of the main (and very beautiful)themes of the film.

    The film's colours tell a story in themselves. In a drab, wartimeBritain, Caitlin and Vera are vivid highlights in an ocean of grey.Shortly after meeting Vera's lit-up-in-lights stage persona, weencounter Caitlin through her searing blue eyes, sparkling in adarkened railway carriage. Her dramatic red coat cuts a dash throughstreets of colourless homogeneity, triumphing on a beautiful staircaseas she reunites with Dylan. But Vera's lipstick red brightness is lessenduring. For her, marriage is second-best, even when she has becomepossessed with genuine love for her husband.

    Outstanding cinematography extends to using montage to juxtaposeimages, in a manner similar to poetry's juxtaposition of unrelatedwords to create further meaning. Horrific war scenes in Thessaly areintercut with screams of Vera in pregnancy. Giving birth or is itabortion? We are not told immediately. Pain is universal and goesbeyond time and place to our present day.

    Constant echoes of Dylan's poetry throughout the film lead us beyondearthly opposites. It reminds me of Marlon Brando reading TS Eliot inApocalypse Now. A light beyond the horrors of the world. A differentway of seeing things. "I'll take you back to a time when no bombs fellfrom the sky and no-one died – ever," says Dylan to Vera as they walkalong the beach. Elsewhere, Caitlin recalls childhood with Vera: "We'restill innocent in Dylan," she says.

    There's a time to leave your knickers at home or share a universalcigarette. (Not literally, perhaps.) A time to be inspired. Enjoy whatis possibly the best British film of the year.

  6. rogerdarlington from United Kingdom
    30 Mar 2012, 3:28 pm

    Set during the Second World War in both London and Wales, this filmportrays the complex relationships between four real-life characters:the Welsh poet Dylan Thomas (played by Welsh actor Matthew Rhysabandoning his American accent from the US television series "BrothersAnd Sisters"), his Irish wife Caitlin MacNamara (British actress SiennaMiller), his first love Vera Phillips (another British actress KeiraKnightley) and Vera's husband the British soldier Captain WilliamKillick (Irish actor Cillian Murphy). Many of the incidents representedare a matter of record but other occurrences are simply speculation onthe part of screenwriter Sharman Macdonald (Knightley's mother).

    In truth, it is Keira Knightley's film. Her striking physiognomy alwaysmakes her a pleasure to watch, but this is the finest performance ofher young (still only 23) career, as she effects a decent Welsh accentand even sings in a nuanced act of thespian of which she can be proud.Director John Maybury does not make the character or the poetry ofDylan Thomas any more accessible but the bonding and bruising betweenhis wife and his lover make for a humanistic tale.

  7. detkor from Belgium
    30 Mar 2012, 3:28 pm

    Despite the title and unlike some other stories about love and war,this film isn't too sticky and pink, because love is as a rose: Withthorns, that is. The four leading actors set their characters realisticand with a good sense and balance between the tragic and thedown-to-earth.

    The music and lyrics of the cabaret/chanson-esquire songs (sung b KeiraKnightley herself) drag the viewer deeper and deeper in the film, fromone place to another, between the brutal war and amongst the peacefullove. Some people may find it too much a biopic, but it ís mostly aromantic story, even though it consequently follows the life of DylanThomas and the triangular relationship which is steeped by joy andjealousy.

    London gets visualized from another angle for once, the bohemian lifeof Dylan during the bombings of the Germans is set in a floatingatmosphere of small bedrooms, pubs and bars. The independent women, thesoldier and the charismatic poet are constantly swept in both feelingsof love and anger.

    Maybe the end is too twisted and hangs somewhat loosely to the rest ofthe film, but all in all this is a great romantic story.

  8. gannett from United Kingdom
    30 Mar 2012, 3:28 pm

    With its ww2 timing, falling in and out of love, and easy on the eyeKira, this is re-Atonement.

    This a relationship story with focused main characters working out thethe balance between first and fast love in the home front of WW2. PoetDylan Thomas philanders his way between wife and ex in dark and smokyBlitz London and later in windy wales.

    Vera's ex and next spark off each other as the poet and soldier becomea sideline while the girls bond and share. An easy watch that workswell in the era bouncing along with just a few dips in pace. Would workwell with French subtitles but then I may have been to too many arthouse movies lately.

  9. lostidols from United States
    30 Mar 2012, 3:28 pm

    I was fortunate to attend the London premier of this film. While I amnot at all a fan of British drama, I did find myself deeply moved bythe characters and the BAD CHOICES they made. I was in tears by the endof the film. Every scene was mesmerizing. The attention to detail andthe excellent acting was quite impressive.

    I would have to agree with some of the other comments here whichquestion why all these women were throwing themselves at such adespicable character.

    *******SPOLIER ALERT******** I was also hoping that Dylan would havebeen killed by William when he had the chance! ****END SPOILER*****

    Keira Knightley did a great job and radiate beauty and innocence fromthe screen, but it was Sienna Miller's performance that was truly Oscarworthy.

    I am sure this production will be nominated for other awards.

  10. lostidols from United States
    30 Mar 2012, 3:28 pm

    I was fortunate to attend the London premier of this film. While I amnot at all a fan of British drama, I did find myself deeply moved bythe characters and the BAD CHOICES they made. I was in tears by the endof the film. Every scene was mesmerizing. The attention to detail andthe excellent acting was quite impressive.

    I would have to agree with some of the other comments here whichquestion why all these women were throwing themselves at such adespicable character.

    *******SPOLIER ALERT******** I was also hoping that Dylan would havebeen killed by William when he had the chance! ****END SPOILER*****

    Keira Knightley did a great job and radiate beauty and innocence fromthe screen, but it was Sienna Miller's performance that was truly Oscarworthy.

    I am sure this production will be nominated for other awards.

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