Sucker Punch (2011) Poster

Sucker Punch (2011)

  • Rate: 6.1/10 total 97,329 votes 
  • Genre: Action | Adventure | Fantasy | Thriller
  • Release Date: 25 March 2011 (USA)
  • Runtime: 110 min | 127 min (extended cut)
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Sucker Punch (2011)

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  • IMDb page: Sucker Punch (2011)
  • Rate: 6.1/10 total 97,329 votes 
  • Genre: Action | Adventure | Fantasy | Thriller
  • Release Date: 25 March 2011 (USA)
  • Runtime: 110 min | 127 min (extended cut)
  • Filming Location: Vancouver Film Studios, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  • Budget: $82,000,000(estimated)
  • Gross: $89,792,502(Worldwide)(31 December 2011)
  • Director: Zack Snyder
  • Stars: Emily Browning, Vanessa Hudgens and Abbie Cornish
  • Original Music By: Tyler Bates  Marius De Vries   
  • Soundtrack: SEARCH AND DESTROY
  • Sound Mix: Dolby Digital | DTS | SDDS
  • Plot Keyword: Escape | Stepfather | Imagination | Lobotomy | Samurai

Writing Credits By:

  • Zack Snyder (screenplay) &
  • Steve Shibuya (screenplay)
  • Zack Snyder (story)

Known Trivia

  • Amanda Seyfried was the first choice for Babydoll, but she dropped out due to scheduling conflicts.
  • Emma Stone was in early talks to star as Amber, but dropped out to star in Easy A.
  • Evan Rachel Wood was the first choice for Rocket but dropped out due to scheduling conflicts and Jena Malone replaced her.
  • Zack Snyder told Vanessa Hudgens that this feature would be his first action movie, despite the fact that 300 is considered an action movie.
  • Vanessa Hudgens says she’s looking forward to being seen by a whole new audience that might not necessarily be familiar with her work in the “High School Musical” films.
  • Olivia Thirlby was at one stage rumored to replace Amanda Seyfried as Babydoll before Emily Browning replaced her.
  • Eric Dane was one of the choices to play High Roller.
  • Tim McGraw was considered for the role of High Roller.
  • Before Jamie Chung replaced Emma Stone as Amber, Freida Pinto was considered to play the role.
  • The two banners beside Scott Glenn’s character as shown in the trailer are a famous couplet from ‘The Art of War’ by Sun Tzu: “Move swift as the Wind and closely-formed as the Wood. Attack like the Fire and be still as the Mountain.” This was later made into a famous battle standard by the Japanese warlord Takeda Shingen.

Goofs: Audio/visual unsynchronized: The audio for the Gatling cannon used by the second Samurai warrior in the first battle scene is incorrect as it uses the effect for a gun with a much lower rate of fire even though initially the movie is going at a normal pace with no slowdown.

Plot: A young girl is institutionalized by her abusive stepfather. Retreating to an alternative reality as a coping strategy, she envisions a plan which will help her escape from the mental facility. Full summary »  »

Story: A young girl (Baby Doll) is locked away in a mental asylum by her abusive stepfather where she will undergo a lobotomy in five days' time. Faced with unimaginable odds, she retreats to a fantastical world in her imagination where she and four other female inmates at the asylum, plot to escape the facility. The lines between reality and fantasy blur as Baby Doll and her four companions, as well as a mysterious guide, fight to retrieve the five items they need that will allow them to break free from their captors before it's too late…Written by Anonymous  

Synopsis

Synopsis: After the sudden death of her mother, 16-year-old Baby Doll (Emily Browning) and her 11-year-old younger sister are almost killed by their evil and greedy stepfather (Gerard Plunkett) in his attempt to claim their inheritance for himself. Baby Doll gets her stepfather’s gun and tries to kill him — but accidently kills her sister instead. This gives her stepfather the perfect reason to claim that Baby Doll is insane, and has her committed.

At the Lennox Institution, Baby Doll is ushered into an auditorium with other mentally disturbed girls and their Polish therapist, Dr. Vera Gorski (Carla Gugino). Here, Baby Doll overhears her stepfather discussing an arrangement with the Asylum’s director, Dr. Blue Jones (Oscar Isaac) who has forged Gorski’s signature to approve a lobotomy on Baby Doll in five days so she will not remember her stepfather’s scheme and so he will be able to claim all of her inheritance and so Dr. Blue will get a cut of the money from the stepfather.

Baby Doll also overhears Dr. Gorski telling the girls that they have power within their minds; through her imagination, Baby Doll then visualizes the Institution as a dance hall, with her stepfather as a corrupt priest and Blue as the owner of the dance hall. Dr. Gorski is seen as the dance instructor for the girls in the hall. Another girl, Rocket (Jena Malone) quickly befriends Baby Doll, but Rocket’s older sister, Sweet Pea (Abbie Cornish), scoffs at her. A bond forms soon after when Baby Doll saves Rocket from being attacked by the Institution’s cook.

During the dance rehersal, Dr. Gorski tries to get Baby Doll to dance and, finally, Baby does. When she dances, Baby Doll finds herself transported to a Japanese Dojo…

Inside the Dojo, Baby Doll finds an old man (Scott Glenn) who gives her sound advice. He claims to know that the High-Roller (Jon Hamm) (outside Baby Doll’s imagination, he is the lobotomist) will come for Baby Doll in five days, and he gives Baby Doll weapons for her survival: a katana sword and a handgun, which can be used in her dream world. The old man also states that, if Baby Doll is to live, she must collect five objects: a map, fire, a knife, a key, and a fifth object… which she’ll need to discover for herself. Upon leaving the Dojo, Baby Doll is set upon by three giant samurai warriors. At first passive, Baby Doll soon slays the giants after a fierce battle, and her "dance" ends.

The other girls in the dance troupe are impressed: all except Sweet Pea. In the dressing room later, Baby Doll outlines her escape plan to several of the girls. Rocket and two other girls, Blondie (Vanessa Hudgens) and Amber (Jamie Chung), are willing to help, but Sweet Pea takes some coaxing before finally agreeing, and with the condition that they give up if the plan becomes too dangerous.

The girls put a plan into effect to get the map in Blue’s office. Sweet Pea coaxes Blue to watch Baby Doll dance. After he leaves his office, she uses a copying machine to make a copy of the facility’s map.

Meanwhile, Baby Doll dances for Blue and goes into her dream-state. In a World War I setting, the old man appears, giving the girls orders to retrieve a map being held by steam-punk, reanimated German infantrymen. Amber pilots a giant mech-suit while the girls make their way into the enemy trenches. After a surreal firefight with the undead German troops, they manage to retrieve the map, and Baby Doll’s dance for Blue ends.

Afterwords, Blue tells Gorski that he is impressed and wants to have Baby Doll perform for the Mayor. Gorski says that Baby Doll is not ready for such a performance, but Blue demands his way. He then returns to his office, only to find the copier still warm, and the push-pins in the facility’s map in a slightly different arrangement. The girls soon get wind of the request, and Amber is chosen to retrieve the Mayor’s cigar lighter. It will give them the fire that they need.

When the Mayor visits for the performance, Amber retrieves the lighter while Baby Doll distracts him with a dance. Her imagination gives way, and she finds herself in a medieval setting with the old man and the other girls, aboard a World War II bomber. The old man outlines the plan: to make their way into the castle below, slit the throat of a baby dragon, and retrieve two stones in its throat that will produce fire…. without awaking the mother of the dragon. Amber and Blondie stay on the plane; Baby Doll, Sweet Pea, and Rocket land and enter the castle. Fighting off a horde of evil creatures, Baby Doll manages to find the baby dragon. She kills it and retrieves the stones, but not before the baby cries out — and its enormous mother hears. The enormous dragon pursues the girls, until Baby Doll at last kills it, driving her kitana into its brain.

In the club, the dance ends. The girls gather in their dressing room, ecstatic that Amber has retrieved the second thing on the list. They hide it none too soon as Blue and his henchmen come to see the girls. His tone is one of malice: he says that he feels hurt that the girls may be hiding something from him or doing something behind his back. After he leaves, Sweet Pea demands that they call the plan off; but the other girls want to see it through to the end.

The girls (except Blondie) soon are working in the kitchen, with the intent to get a knife from the cook. They shock him when they suddenly set up Baby Doll to ‘perform,’ with Rocket attempting to placate him, while Sweet Pea retrieves the knife from one of his holsters.

Baby Doll then goes into her dance, and in her mind’s eye, the girls find themselves on a strange planet in a helicopter piloted by Amber. The old man is with them again, giving orders that there is a bomb on a speeding train headed for a futuristic city. The girls are to disable the bomb, and get away with it. Baby Doll, Sweet Pea, and Rocket make their way through an army of cyborg guards, and disable the bomb. However, one of the cyborgs is not completely destroyed, and he ends up reactivating it. With little time to spare, Rocket sacrifices herself to save Baby Doll and Sweet Pea.

This is reflected back in reality in the kitchen when the cook catches Sweet Pea attempting to steal his knife. He then attempts to stab her, but instead stabs Rocket, killing her. Blue soon finds out, and has Sweet Pea locked away, when the cook tells what she was doing.

Amber manages to hide the knife, but the next day, ‘The High-Roller’ arrives to see Baby Doll. The girls are still without their 4th and 5th elements to escape. As they prepare for their performance, Blue arrives in the dressing room, and explains that Blondie told him everything, under the pretenses that none of the girls would be hurt. Blue then threatens Gorski, before shooting and killing both Amber and Blondie. Everyone else leaves the dressing room, as Blue attempts to have his way with Baby Doll. However, she manages to find the knife Amber hid, and stabs him in the shoulder. In his dazed state, she claims "you’ll never have me!" and takes his key.

Baby Doll then retrieves the other items, and frees Sweet Pea from her isolation cell. She then uses the lighter and a bottle of liquor to start a fire in a closet. They then use the map to make their way to the security doors, before the fire is found, and the alarms are pulled, which unlocks all the security doors. The two then sneak out to the front entrance, but find the way blocked by several large men.

It is then that Baby Doll realizes what the fifth item need to escape is: her. She then tells Sweet Pea that she was never meant to escape, but to help Sweet Pea get back to her family. Sweet Pea doesn’t want to abandon Baby Doll, but finally does so, escaping through the front gates of the facility, as Baby Doll creates a distraction, before being brought back into the facility, and into the confines with the High-Roller.

(EXTENDED CUT EXTRA SCENE)

After Baby Doll’s beatdown, Sweet Pea has already escaped and Baby Doll meets the infamous High Roller in a room from the brothel. They make sex, but the High Roller requests for her to make sex with him if she desires it innerly in her heart, but she refuses. Quite decilousioned, the High Roller offers Baby Doll freedom from the brothel, if she desired it. She accepts and they start to kiss

In the Extended version on the movie, they actually show why the Lobotomist was so surprised. In that scene baby dolls tries to come over the fear of getting lobotomized by imagining that the Lobotomist will get her rid her of all her pain and the guilt that because of her plan she got rest of the three girls killed. Thus she keeps her eyes open and looks her the Lobotomist as if she wanted him to do it.

The scene then transitions to the aftermath of the lobotomy. As the doctor cleans up, he is shaken by the look on Baby Doll’s face, feeling that she showed almost no fear about what was to befall her. Dr. Gorski soon talks to him, claiming that Baby Doll caused numerous problems at the facility, including setting fire to a closet, and even stabbing the head of the facility, Blue. The Lobotomist still questions the speed of the request that Gorski signed regarding Baby Doll, but the Doctor shockingly explains that she did not make any such request!

Meanwhile, the lobotomized Baby Doll is led away, but to a private room where Blue is waiting. Once alone, he claims that the lobotomized girl has no way to stop him from doing what he wants… before the door bursts open, and Gorski, the Lobotomist and several police officers are seen. The officers drag Blue out, as he wails that Baby Doll’s Stepfather was the person behind the whole idea. Baby Doll continues sitting motionless in her chair as a smile builds on her face as she realizes that what the old man told her in her dreams was true; her ultimate sacrifice has become her ultimate victory which that despite the fact that Baby Doll is now a human vegetable, the people responsible for her semi-death will be brought to justice and her friend Sweet Pea is now free.

In the epilogue, we see Sweet Pea at a local bus depot about to depart on a bus for Fort Wayne, Indiana. As she is about to get on, some policemen approach her and want to ask her some questions. Before she can respond, the bus driver (who is the same old man from Baby Doll’s imaginative dreams!) tells the officers that the girl just stepped off the bus to use the restrooms, and that he has a schedule to keep. The officers believe him, and Sweet Pea boards the bus. She tells the driver she doesn’t have a ticket, but he simply tells her to take a seat in the back and have a rest. As the bus takes off, we see it going down an old dirt road, passing a billboard with the words ‘Paradise Diner’ on it, a sign that almost hints to us that Sweet Pea is heading towards a new life.

 

FullCast & Crew

Produced By:

  • Wesley Coller known as executive producer
  • Christopher DeFaria known as executive producer
  • Jon Jashni known as executive producer
  • Jim Rowe known as executive producer
  • Deborah Snyder known as producer
  • Zack Snyder known as producer
  • Thomas Tull known as executive producer

FullCast & Crew:

  • Emily Browning known as Babydoll
  • Abbie Cornish known as Sweet Pea
  • Jena Malone known as Rocket
  • Vanessa Hudgens known as Blondie
  • Jamie Chung known as Amber
  • Carla Gugino known as Dr. Vera Gorski
  • Oscar Isaac known as Blue Jones
  • Jon Hamm known as High Roller / Doctor
  • Scott Glenn known as Wise Man
  • Richard Cetrone known as CJ
  • Gerard Plunkett known as Stepfather
  • Malcolm Scott known as The Cook
  • Ron Selmour known as Danforth
  • Alan C. Peterson known as Mayor / Lighter Orderly (as AC Peterson)
  • Revard Dufresne known as Big Boss Thug / Orderly #3
  • Kelora Clingwall known as Babydoll's Mother
  • Frederique De Raucourt known as Babydoll's Sister
  • Monique Ganderton known as Lobotomy Nurse / High Roller Girl #1
  • Lee Tomaschefski known as Lobotomy Nurse / High Roller Girl #2
  • Eli Snyder known as Tommy Soldier #1
  • Cainan Wiebe known as Tommy Soldier #2
  • Danny Bristol known as Tommy Soldier #3
  • Brad Kelly known as Guard / Chauffeur #1
  • Peter Bryant known as Guard / Chauffeur #2
  • Patrick Sabongui known as Earl
  • John R. Taylor known as Grim Doctor
  • Chris Nowland known as Cemetary Cop
  • Christine Willes known as Reception Nurse / Designer
  • Gina Garenkooper known as Bitter Clipboard Nurse
  • Michael Adamthwaite known as State Trooper #1
  • Phillip Mitchell known as State Trooper #2
  • Ian Tracey known as Police Officer #1
  • Sean Campbell known as Police Officer #2
  • Arassay Reyes known as Dancer
  • Danielle Benton known as Dancer
  • Caitlin Goguen known as Dancer
  • Maiko Miyauchi known as Dancer
  • Paula Giroday known as Dancer
  • Louise Hradsky known as Dancer
  • Juliana Semenova known as Dancer
  • Allie Bertram known as Dancer
  • Vicky Lambert known as Dancer
  • Caroline Torti known as Dancer
  • Chantal Hunt known as Dancer
  • Carla Catherwood known as Dancer
  • Stephanie Sy known as Dancer
  • Kathryn Schellenberg known as Dancer
  • Geneen Georgiev known as Dancer (as Geneen Gorgiev)
  • Annie Au known as Dancer
  • Tia Haraga known as Dancer
  • Hailley Caulfield known as Dancer
  • Daniela Dib known as Dancer
  • Jeff Dimitriou known as 'Emilio' Gangster Dancer
  • John Howard known as Band Member #1
  • Thomas Fornataro known as Band Member #2
  • Antoine Baby Harry Calaway known as Band Member #3
  • G! Force known as Band Member #4
  • Nii Nortey Engmann known as Band Member #5
  • Gary A. Hecker known as Special Creature Vocals (as Gary Hecker)
  • Cara Hrdlitschka known as Brothel girl (uncredited)

..

 

Supporting Department

Makeup Department:
  • Suma Adams known as special makeup effects artist: Quantum Creation FX
  • Jason Barnett known as prosthetic technician: Quantum Creation FX
  • Christian Beckman known as special makeup effects
  • Anji Bemben known as hair department head
  • Rosalina Da Silva known as makeup designer
  • Emanuela Daus known as makeup artist
  • David DeLeon known as special makeup effects artist: Quantum Creation Fx
  • Renee Dombrosky known as assistant hair stylist
  • Michael Ezell known as special makeup effects artist
  • Bill Fesh known as special makeup effects
  • Thomas Floutz known as special makeup effects artist
  • Vanessa Giles known as key makeup artist
  • Céline Godeau known as special makeup effects artist
  • Kelly Golden known as special makeup effects artist
  • Joe Gomez known as mold department supervisor: Quantum Creation FX
  • Leslie Graham known as makeup artist
  • Rachel Griffin known as special makeup effects artist
  • Naomi Hirano known as makeup artist
  • Diane Holme known as hair stylist
  • Kevin Kirkpatrick known as special makeup effects artist: Quantum Creation Fx
  • Louis Kiss known as special makeup effects artist
  • Amanda Kuryk known as daily makeup artist
  • Harlow MacFarlane known as special makeup effects artist
  • Sharon Markell known as hair stylist
  • Amanda McGowan known as assistant makeup artist
  • Ann McLaren known as special makeup effects artist
  • Tana Lynn Moldovanos known as assistant makeup artist
  • Sharon Mosley known as hair stylist
  • Tamar Ouziel known as assistant makeup artist
  • Cristina Patterson Ceret known as contact lens painter
  • Christopher Mark Pinhey known as makeup artist
  • Jessica Rain known as hair stylist
  • Justin Raleigh known as special makeup effects department head
  • Geoff Redknap known as special makeup effects artist
  • Michele Tyminski known as key makeup artist: Quantum Creation FX
  • Jill Warner known as shipping coordinator: QCFX

Art Department:

  • David Asmodeus known as props buyer
  • Jennifer Bash known as art researcher
  • Graham Brown known as metal fabricator
  • Lubor Cencak known as scenic artist
  • Joel Chang known as concept artist
  • James H. Chow known as property master
  • Trevor Christie known as storyboard administrator
  • Matthew Clancy known as scenic carpenter
  • David Clarke known as assistant art director
  • John Dale known as construction coordinator
  • Richard Darwin known as action props
  • Allan Galajda known as set designer
  • Jack Gauvreau known as head sculptor
  • Dean Goodine known as prop buyer
  • Sheila Haley known as set designer
  • Billy Hunter known as set designer
  • Charmaine Husum known as props painter
  • Patrick Kearns known as on-set dresser
  • Jan Kobylka known as supervising construction coordinator
  • Jason B. Landels known as assistant property master
  • Carmen Lee known as art assistant
  • Catherine Leighton known as assistant property master
  • Nicole Lobart known as concept illustrator
  • Rohan Lyal known as head greensman
  • Cheryl Marion known as set designer
  • Jeff Markwith known as set designer
  • Max Matsuoka known as assistant property master
  • Ben Mauro known as concept designer
  • Sean McGee known as on-set props assistant
  • Sam McGowan known as plasterer
  • Jay Mitchell known as set designer
  • Audra Neil known as set buyer
  • Melissa Olson known as set decoration coordinator
  • Dan Petrescu known as lead painter
  • Hamish Purdy known as assistant set decorator
  • Jim Ramsay known as set designer
  • Margot Ready known as set designer
  • Steffen Reichstadt known as concept artist
  • Steve Reintjes known as paint general foreman
  • Todd Rex known as sculptor
  • Michel Rheault known as construction buyer
  • Guy Roland known as set dresser
  • Francisco Rosa known as plasterer (2010)
  • Charlie Schrodt known as set dresser
  • Dean Sherriff known as illustrator
  • Dennis Simard known as lead set dresser
  • Bryan Sutton known as set designer
  • Henrik Tamm known as conceptual illustrator
  • Mario Tomas-Niedworok known as head scenic artist
  • Paul Wagner known as assistant property master: re-shoot
  • Carie Wallis known as art department coordinator
  • Vernon Winn known as metal fabricator
  • Milena Zdravkovic known as illustrator
  • Sonia Zimmerman known as props
  • Gordon Bellamy known as prop fabrication: tEAG Ltd. (uncredited)
  • David Griffiths known as set dresser (uncredited)

..

 

Company

Production Companies:

  • Warner Bros. Pictures (presents)
  • Legendary Pictures (in association with)
  • Cruel & Unusual Films (as Cruel and Unusual)
  • Lennox House Films

Other Companies:

  • Aaron Sims Company, The  characters and designs
  • Aaron Sims Company, The  concept design: fantasy sequence
  • Company 3  digital intermediate
  • Corbis  thanks
  • Deva Studios  title design (as Devastudios)
  • Dolby Laboratories  sound mix
  • Gallagher Entertainment  insurance (uncredited)
  • Hollywood Film Chorale  choir
  • Los Angeles Rag House  grip and lighting equipment
  • OTC Productions  digital asset management
  • Sony Classical  soundtrack
  • Vancouver Film Studios  thanks
  • WaterTower Music  soundtrack

Distributors:

  • Acme Film (2011) (Lithuania) (theatrical)
  • Columbia TriStar Warner Filmes de Portugal (2011) (Portugal) (theatrical)
  • Karo Premiere (2011) (Russia) (theatrical)
  • Village Films (2011) (Greece) (theatrical)
  • Warner Bros. Entertainment (2011) (Canada) (theatrical)
  • Warner Bros. Pictures (2011) (USA) (theatrical)
  • Warner Bros. (2011) (Argentina) (theatrical)
  • Warner Bros. (2011) (Belgium) (theatrical)
  • Warner Bros. (2011) (Germany) (theatrical)
  • Warner Bros. (2011) (France) (theatrical)
  • Warner Bros. (2011) (Japan) (theatrical)
  • Warner Bros. (2011) (Netherlands) (theatrical)
  • Warner Bros. (2011) (Singapore) (theatrical)
  • Argentina Video Home (2011) (Argentina) (DVD)
  • Argentina Video Home (2011) (Argentina) (DVD) (Blu-ray)
  • Warner Home Video (2011) (Belgium) (DVD)
  • Warner Home Video (2011) (Belgium) (DVD) (Blu-ray)
  • Warner Home Video (2011) (Germany) (DVD)
  • Warner Home Video (2011) (Germany) (DVD) (Blu-ray)
  • Warner Home Video (2011) (UK) (DVD)
  • Warner Home Video (2011) (UK) (DVD) (Blu-ray)
  • Warner Home Video (2011) (Netherlands) (DVD)
  • Warner Home Video (2011) (Netherlands) (DVD) (Blu-ray)
  • Warner Home Video (2011) (USA) (DVD)
  • Warner Home Video (2011) (USA) (DVD) (Blu-ray)

..

 

Other Stuff

Special Effects:

  • Animal Logic (visual effects)
  • Digiscope (visual effects)
  • Moving Picture Company (MPC) (visual effects) (as MPC)
  • Pixomondo (visual effects) (as Pixomondo Visual Effects)
  • Prime Focus (visual effects)
  • Quantum Creation FX (prosthetics and creature effects)
  • Tinsley Studio (custom tattoo body suits)
  • With A Twist Studio

Visual Effects by:

  • Matthew Adams known as digital compositor: Animal Logic
  • Briana Aeby known as visual effects coordinator: Prime Focus
  • Briana Aeby known as visual effects production manager: Prime Focus LA
  • Lee Alexander known as matchmove lead: MPC
  • Laurence Andrews known as digital artist: layout
  • Sean Araki known as systems administrator: Pixomondo
  • Brent Armfield known as visual effects coordinator: Animal Logic
  • Vaughn Arnup known as matchmove supervisor
  • Vaughn Arnup known as roto supervisor
  • K.H. Aslam known as senior matchmove artist: MPC Bangalore
  • Aymeric Aute known as visual effects artist
  • Ferda Guray Ayaokur known as track/matchmove artist
  • Nithin Babu known as roto artist: The Moving Picture Company
  • Aloys Baillet known as lead software developer
  • Sotiris Bakosis known as visual effects artist: Animal Logic (as Sot Bakosis)
  • Aaron Barclay known as lead digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Marc-André Baron known as digital artist: Animal Logic (as Marc Andre Baron)
  • Lyndon Barrois known as animation director
  • Lyndon Barrois known as animation supervisor: Prime Focus
  • Romain Bayle known as matte painting supervisor
  • Corey Belina known as digital artist: Prime Focus
  • Gregory Bellis known as matchmove artist: Animal Logic
  • Riley Benard known as digital compositor: Prime Focus World VFX
  • Jerome Berglund known as visual effects production assistant: Prime Focus
  • Petter Bergmark known as senior texture artist
  • Hitesh Bharadia known as senior color & lighting/compositing
  • Yatin Bhave known as digital artist: primefocus
  • Michael Bilog known as visual effects accountant
  • Emmanuel Blasset known as cg supervisor: Animal Logic
  • Alex Blatt known as additional visual effects editor
  • Laurie Blavin known as senior recuiter: MPC
  • Florin Boieriu known as digital compositor: Prime Focus LA
  • Mark Boorer known as data technician: Animal Logic
  • Landon Bootsma known as digital compositor: MPC
  • Jelmer Boskma known as character modeler
  • Yanick Bourgie known as lead digital matte painter: Animal Logic
  • Xavier Bourque known as digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Christopher Boylan Jr. known as rigging artist: MPC (as Christopher Boylan)
  • Paul Braddock known as digital effects artist
  • Ravinder Brar known as digital artist: Prime Focus (as Rav Brar)
  • Andy Brown known as visual effects supervisor: Animal Logic (as Andrew Congreve Brown)
  • James Brown known as visual effects production assistant
  • Randy Brown known as digital compositor
  • Daniel Bryant known as digital compositor: MPC
  • Andreas Bundenthal known as effects artist
  • Jan Burda known as compositor: Pixomondo
  • Robert Burden known as visual effects artist
  • Heiko Burkardsmaier known as visual effects business affairs: Pixomondo
  • Jeffrey Burt known as lead layout artist
  • David Burton known as visual effects supervisor: With A Twist Studio
  • Ivan Busquets known as lead compositor
  • Sebastian Butenberg known as character animators: Pixomondo
  • Billy Butler known as digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Martin Bönnle known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Francesco Canonico known as animator
  • Qing Cao known as rotoscope/paint: Pixomondo
  • Cyrille Caron known as digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Damien Carr known as visual effects coordinator: Animal Logic
  • Damien Carr known as visual effects production coordinator: Animal Logic
  • Damien Carr known as visual effects production supervisor: Animal Logic
  • Ean Carr known as compositor
  • Steve Casa known as 3d scan technician
  • Korey J. Cauchon known as visual effects producer: Prime Focus
  • Adrian Chan known as look dev artist / senior character modeler
  • Philip Chaoui known as 3d generalist intern: Pixomondo
  • Andrew Chapman known as cg supervisor: Animal Logic
  • Eve Chauvet known as digital artist: MPC
  • Christopher Chen known as visual effects producer: Pixomondo
  • Georgios Cherouvim known as effects technical director: MPC
  • Trevor Chong known as effects technical director: MPC
  • Crystal Choo known as visual effects coordinator: Prime Focus
  • Bodie Clare known as digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Ryan B. Clarke known as digital compositor: MPC (as Ryan Clarke)
  • James Cochrane known as visual effects assistant production coordinator
  • Ben Cole known as lead digital artist: MPC
  • Peter Commins known as digital artist: Animal Logic (as Pete Commins)
  • Patrick Conaty known as digital compositor
  • Clara Coulter known as Lidar technician
  • Stuart Cripps known as compositing supervisor
  • Stuart Cripps known as visual effects production supervisor: Pixomondo
  • Christopher Crouzet known as lead character technical director: Animal Logic
  • Kevin Culhane known as animator: Prime Focus
  • Mark Curtis known as digital supervisor: MPC
  • Rick Curtis known as digital artist: Prime Focus
  • Enid Dalkoff known as digital compositor
  • David Dally known as lead digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Megan Danzerfer known as 3d integration manager: Prime Focus (as Megan Danderfer)
  • Pedram Daraeizadeh known as render wrangler
  • Adam Davis known as head of crowd sim: MPC
  • Joanna Davison known as digital artist: Animal Logic (as Joanna Davidson)
  • Willam Day known as VFX editor: Pixomondo
  • Jose Fernandez de Castro known as compositor
  • Yoshi DeHerrera known as 3d scanning & modeling
  • Christian Deiß known as visual effects technical director: Pixomondo
  • Kevin Del Colle known as digital film scanner
  • Stanley A. Dellimore known as head of layout: MPC
  • Stanley A. Dellimore known as lead digital artist: MPC (as Stanley Dellimore)
  • John 'D.J.' Des Jardin known as visual effects supervisor (as John 'DJ' DesJardin)
  • Marc Desmarais known as digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Shiv Dholakia known as visual effects artist
  • Anthony Di Ninno known as animator: MPC (as Anthony DiNinno)
  • Craig Dibble known as senior systems engineer: Animal Logic
  • Ben Dishart known as senior surfacing artist: Animal Logic
  • Damian Doennig known as division DFX supervisor: Pixomondo
  • Damian Doennig known as visual effects production supervisor: Pixomondo
  • Florian Doetsch known as 3d digital artists: Pixomondo
  • Paolo Dominici known as character td: Animal Logic
  • Jan Dubberke known as senior compositor: MPC
  • Peter Dudley known as digital artist: Prime Focus
  • Georg Duemlein known as research & development technical director
  • Boris T. Duepré known as visual effects associate producer: Pixomondo
  • Simon Dye known as compositor
  • Emily Döhler-Knox known as digital artist: Prime Focus (as Emily Beaulieu)
  • Kishan E. Chandran known as matchmove artist: The Moving Picture Company
  • Scott Eade known as layout artist: mpc
  • Robert East known as lighting technical director: Animal Logic (as Rob East)
  • Brett Ellis known as digital artist
  • Theresa Ellis known as digital compositor: Pixomondo (as Theresa Ellis Rygiel)
  • Kent Estep known as digital effects artist
  • Joe Eveleigh known as digital artist: MPC
  • Thilo Ewers known as visual effects production supervisor: Pixomondo
  • Sabine Ewers-Schorr known as recruiter: Pixomondo
  • Mike Fagundes known as digital artist: Prime Focus
  • Devin Fairbairn known as 3d integration manager: Prime Focus
  • Matthew Fairclough known as digital artist: Prime Focus (as Matt Fairclough)
  • Marco Fanari known as 3d digital artist: Pixomondo
  • Ian Farnsworth known as digital artist: Prime Focus
  • Gordon Farrell known as digital artist: MPC
  • Jose Fernandez known as digital artist: MPC
  • Jose Fernandez known as digital artist: MPC
  • Jan Fiedler known as visual effects coordinator: Pixomondo
  • Michael L. Fink known as senior visual effects supervisor: Prime Focus VFX
  • Felix Fissel known as senior it manager: Pixomondo
  • Lianne Forbes known as digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Mike Ford known as animator
  • Jason Forster known as compositor
  • Raffaele Fragapane known as character supervisor: Animal Logic
  • Boominathan Frances known as matchmove artist
  • Florian Franke known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Rogier Fransen known as lead crowd technical director
  • Evan Fraser known as digital artist: Prime Focus
  • Fortunato Frattasio known as visual effects artist: Digiscope
  • Laura Fremmerlid known as paint/roto artist: Prime Focus
  • Xiangxiang Fu known as rotoscope/paint: Pixomondo
  • John Fukushima known as digital compositor
  • Jason Gagnon known as environment modeler / lighting td: MPC
  • Jigesh Gajjar known as matchmove supervisor: The Moving Picture Company
  • Matthaeus Gamroth known as 3d animator intern: Pixomondo
  • Ignacio Garcerón known as visual effects artist
  • Kayn Garcia known as digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Thibault Gauriau known as td effect: MPC
  • Reza Ghobadi nic known as crowd technical director: Animal Logic (as Reza Ghobadinic)
  • Mathew Giampa known as digital compositor: Prime Focus (as Matthew Giampa)
  • Daniela Giangrande known as visual effects production coordinator: Animal Logic
  • Daniela Giangrande known as visual effects production manager: Animal Logic
  • Daniela Giangrande known as visual effects production supervisor: Animal Logic
  • Ben Gillingham-Sutton known as roto/prep supervisor: MPC (as Benedict Gillingham-Sutton)
  • Maribeth Glass known as lighting technical director
  • Michael Goddard known as digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Rainer Gombos known as visual effects supervisor: Pixomondo
  • Elias Gonzalez known as matte painter
  • Tom Goodenough known as digital artist: MPC (as Thomas Goodenough)
  • Virginie Goulet known as digital compositor
  • Pierre Grage known as senior technical director, effects: Animal Logic
  • Matt Greig known as lead compositor: Animal Logic
  • Jörn Großhans known as compositing supervisor: Pixomondo (as Jorn Grosshans)
  • Eric Guaglione known as head of animation
  • David Gurrea known as senior digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Anne Hall known as digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Mark Hamilton known as digital artist: MPC
  • Pam Hammarlund known as visual effects producer
  • Lisa Hansen known as visual effects coordinator: Pixomondo
  • Michael Harkin known as digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Grant Harris known as digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Alexander Hartwin known as visual effects: Animal Logic
  • Ahmed Hassan known as visual effects artist
  • Edwina Hayes known as visual effects producer: Animal Logic
  • Daniel Heckenberg known as lead software developer: Animal Logic
  • Oliver Heinrich known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Jan Heinze known as division dfx producers: Pixomondo
  • Jan Heinze known as visual effects associate producer: Pixomondo
  • Gunnar Heiss known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Patrick Henry known as witness reference
  • Alan Hernandez known as lighting td
  • Nicole Herr known as senior character animator: Animal Logic
  • Luke Hetherington known as visual effects producer: Animal Logic
  • Bryan Hirota known as visual effects supervisor: Prime Focus Visual Effects
  • David Hirst known as lead digital artist: MPC
  • Cyrus Hogg known as senior technical director
  • Asta Honkavaara known as visual effects production coordinator: Animal Logic (as Astaire Honkavaara)
  • Asta Honkavaara known as visual effects production supervisor: Animal Logic (as Astaire Honkavaara)
  • Astaire Honkavaara known as visual effects production coordinator: Animal Logic
  • Astaire Honkavaara known as visual effects production supervisor: Animal Logic
  • Jared Hromika known as digital artist: MPC
  • Xiandeng Huang known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Christoffer Hulusjö known as technical director: Prime Focus
  • Neil Huxley known as art director / motion graphics supervisor: Prime Focus VFX
  • Martin Höhnle known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Mark Intravartolo known as senior Inferno artist
  • Anna Ivanova known as senior texture artist
  • Mike Jahnke known as digital artist: Prime Focus
  • Manovigianek Jehman known as 3D integration artist
  • Yulin Ji known as 3d digital artists: Pixomondo
  • Benjamin Jones known as render wrangler
  • Bryan Jones known as compositor
  • Dinesh K. Bishnoi known as matchmove artist: The Moving Picture Company
  • Patrick Kavanaugh known as 2D supervisor: Prime Focus
  • Patrick Kavanaugh known as compositing supervisor: Prime Focus
  • Salauddin Kazi known as crowd technical director: Animal Logic
  • Jeffrey Kember known as fx supervisor
  • Marcel Kern known as digital artist: Pixomondo
  • Christian Kesler known as digital matte painter: Animal Logic
  • Katharina Keßler known as visual effects coordination assistant: Pixomondo
  • Alisa Khosrovschahi known as visual effects production assistant
  • Jiwoon Kim known as digital compositor
  • Paul Kirwan known as digital compositor: Animal Logic
  • Dan Knight known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Annika Koch known as visual effects production assistant: Pixomondo
  • Pauline Koh known as render wrangler
  • Arek Komorowski known as lead compositor
  • Muzaffer Korkut known as digital artist
  • Muzaffer Korkut known as effects technical director: MPC
  • Aaron Kramer known as lighting artist
  • Mathew Krentz known as digital compositor: Animal Logic
  • Arnand Kularajah known as visual effects asset manager
  • Martin Kulig known as 3d digital artists: Pixomondo
  • Thomas Kuo known as digital film scanner
  • Jason Labbe known as rigging td: Prime Focus
  • Ken Lam known as digital compositor: Animal Logic
  • Michael Lankes known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Wendy Lanning known as visual effects producer: Prime Focus Visual Effects
  • Shandy Lashley known as visual effects production coordinator
  • Jean-Pascal Leblanc known as lead digital artist: Animal Logic (as Jean Pascal Le Blanc)
  • Michelle Ledesma known as visual effects coordinator
  • Tim LeDoux known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Joung Hoon Lee known as digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Kate Lee known as digital artist: Prime Focus
  • Matthew Lee known as digital artist: Prime Focus (as Matt Lee)
  • Richard S. Lee known as concept artist: Pixomondo (as Richard Lee)
  • Richard S. Lee known as digital matte painter: Pixomondo (as Richard Lee)
  • Steven Lees-Smith known as support engineering supervisor: Animal Logic
  • Eric D Legare known as visual effects technical director
  • Andrew H. Leung known as previsualization supervisor
  • Sebastian Leutner known as division dfx producers: Pixomondo
  • Sebastian Leutner known as visual effects associate producer: Pixomondo
  • Ryan Sunghun Lim known as concept artist / modeler: MPC (as Ryan Lim)
  • Bryan Litson known as lookdev artist / lighting td
  • Stefan Litterini known as visual effects artist: Animal Logic
  • Darren Little known as digital artist: MPC
  • Liwen Liu known as 3D tracking/matchmove: Pixomondo
  • Dave Lockwood known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Gregory Louden known as visual effects technical assistant
  • Blaine Lougheed known as visual effects data wrangler
  • Blaine Lougheed known as visual effects set coordinator
  • Matthias Lowry known as compositor
  • Russell Lum known as visual effects production manager: MPC
  • Demis Lyall-Wilson known as digital compositor: Animal Logic
  • Philip Lücke known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Mark MacDonald known as visual effects production assistant
  • Dawn Brooks Macleod known as visual effects producer: MPC
  • Matt Magnolia known as visual effects production coordinator: Warner Brothers (as Matthew David Magnolia)
  • Angela Magrath known as lead character technical director
  • Kevin Mah known as senior technical director: effects: Animal Logic
  • Christoph Malessa known as executive producer: Pixomondo
  • David Yiu Chung Man known as digital artist: MPC (as David Man)
  • Manikandan known as paint/prep artist
  • Adica Manis known as associate vfx producer: Pixomondo
  • Adica Manis known as visual effects coordinator: Pixomondo (as Addie Manis)
  • Sven Martin known as visual effects production supervisor: Pixomondo
  • Rylan Mattes known as digital artist: MPC
  • Dirk Mauche known as senior modeler: Animal Logic
  • George McCarthy known as visual effects editor
  • Andrew McDonald known as lead digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Andrew McDonald known as lead digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Kenn McDonald known as animation supervisor: Animal Logic
  • Chris McGaw known as digital artist: MPC
  • Graeme McGirr known as lighting lead: Animal Logic
  • Chris McIlveen known as digital artist: Prime Focus
  • Claire McLachlan known as digital compositor: Prime Focus
  • Max McNair known as visual effects production coordinator: Animal Logic
  • Max McNair known as visual effects production supervisor: Animal Logic
  • James McPhail known as effects technical director: MPC
  • Rebecca Melander known as lead digital artist: MPC
  • Pieter Mentz known as effects artist: Pixomondo
  • Jeremy Mesana known as animator
  • Stephanie Meyerink known as digital artist: MPC
  • Rob Meyers known as 3d digital artists: Pixomondo
  • Diana Miao known as digital environments artist
  • Gavin Miljkovich known as visual effects artist
  • Daniel Miller known as digital artist: MPC
  • Srdjan Milosevic known as digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Ryan Mintenko known as digital artist
  • Jonathan Mitchell known as visual effects artist: Prime Focus (as Jon Mitchell)
  • Jambunatha Mn known as matchmove artist: The Moving Picture Company
  • Mo Mohamoud known as visual effects coordinator
  • Pat Moreira known as matchmoving artist: Animal Logic
  • Henrique Moser known as roto/paint artist
  • Mohsen Mousavi known as cg effects supervisor: Pixomondo
  • Mohsen Mousavi known as visual effects production supervisor: Pixomondo
  • Harry Mukhopadhyay known as lead effects technical director: MPC
  • Tricia Mulgrew known as visual effects production supervisor
  • Thierry Muller known as digital compositor: Animal Logic
  • Norah Mulroney known as digital compositor
  • Tim Mulvihill known as visual effects editor: mpc
  • Eoin Murphy known as lead software developer
  • Devan Mussato known as character td: MPC
  • Chris Nabholz known as lighting technical director
  • Leona Naidoo known as visual effects editor
  • Kenneth Nakada known as visual effects art director: Prime Focus VFX
  • Nicholas Nakadate known as visual effects artist: Prime Focus (as Nick Nakadate)
  • Salima Needham known as digital artist: MPC
  • Martin Newcombe known as surfacing artist
  • Carlos-Christian Nickel known as senior lighting technical director
  • Jamie Nimmo known as digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Reika Nishio known as visual effects artist
  • Sam Nixon known as senior integration artist
  • James P. Noon known as tracking
  • John Norris known as business affairs: The Aaron Sims Company
  • John Norris known as visual effects business affairs
  • Joshua Nunn known as lighting technical director: Animal Logic
  • Philip Nussbaumer known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Sean O'Hara known as digital artist: MPC
  • Alex Oddbratt known as fx TD: Animal Logic
  • Alfie Olivier known as animator
  • Tobbe Olsson known as 3d digital artist: Pixomondo (as Torbjorn Olsson)
  • Phil Outen known as digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Christophe Pacaud known as digital compositor
  • Juan Pablo Rui Padinha known as digital artist: Prime Focus
  • Scott Palleiko known as digital effects artist: Animal Logic
  • Suresh Pandi known as roto artist: mpc: MPC
  • Gurpreet Singh Pannu known as matchmove artist: MPC
  • Christian Paradis known as cg supervisor: MPC
  • Christian Paradis known as digital supervisor: MPC
  • Goran Pavles known as effects artist: Pixomondo
  • Patricia Pawlak known as digital artist: MPC
  • Fernando Pazos known as digital artist: Prime Focus
  • Jared Pecht known as digital film scanner
  • Chris Pember known as visual effects artist
  • William Petrucelli known as digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Tobias Pfeiffer known as visual effects editor: Pixomondo
  • Diego Piccinato known as digital compositor: MPC
  • Johannes Pink known as digital artist: Pixomondo
  • Danila Pogalov known as digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Jason Pomerantz known as production supervisor (IMAX Version)
  • Andrew Poole known as senior visual effects coordinator: Prime Focus
  • Christian Poullay known as matchmover
  • Dave Preciado known as motion editor
  • Nina Pries known as compositor: Pixomondo
  • Aitor Prieto known as software engineer: research and development
  • Rajasekar Prince known as matchmove artist
  • Jeremy Pronk known as technical director: Animal Logic
  • Franzisca Puppe known as division dfx producers: Pixomondo
  • Franzisca Puppe known as visual effects associate producer: Pixomondo
  • Kevin Quaid known as lead digital artist: MPC
  • Michael Ralla known as digital compositor: Animal Logic
  • Michael Ranalletta known as digital compositor: MPC
  • Ambrish Rangan known as matchmove artist: MPC
  • Lance Ranzer known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Andrew Renner known as digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Jonathan Reynolds known as visual effects artist
  • Johannes Richter known as digital artist
  • Martin Riedel known as digital artist: MPC
  • Colin Riley known as compositor: mpc
  • Andrew Ritchie known as lead layout artist: Animal Logic
  • Brian Ritz known as visual effects artist
  • Andrew Roberts known as lighting and rendering supervisor: Prime Focus
  • Tavis Roberts known as render wrangler
  • Guillaume Rocheron known as visual effects supervisor: MPC
  • Philip Rosado known as tracking artist: Prime Focus (as Phil Rosado)
  • Sean Rowe known as digital film scanner
  • Alvin Roxas known as render wrangler: MPC
  • Anthony Ruey known as coordinator: Pixomondo
  • Angel Gil Ruiz known as digital artist: Prime Focus (as Angel Ruiz)
  • Chris Ryan known as senior technical director
  • Sajeev Sadanandan known as matchmove artist: The Moving Picture Company
  • Christopher Sage known as lead environment artist: Pixomondo (as Chris Sage)
  • Pierre Salazar known as digital artist
  • Kyle Sandilands known as witness reference
  • Daryl Sawchuk known as animation supervisor: The Moving Picture Company
  • Daryl Sawchuk known as digital supervisor: MPC
  • Stephan Schaefholz known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Boris Schmidt known as cg supervisor: Pixomondo
  • Boris Schmidt known as visual effects production supervisor: Pixomondo
  • Jakob Schmidt known as senior effects technical director
  • Florian Schroeder known as lead digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • László Sebõ known as senior pipeline developer
  • Prateep Siamwalla known as tracking
  • Frederic Simard known as cg lighting artist
  • Domenick Simpson known as digital artist: lighting
  • Aaron Sims known as visual effects designer
  • Nick Sinnott known as camera tracker: Prime Focus VFX
  • Christian Sjostedt known as lighting technical director
  • Christian Sjostedt known as surfacing technical director
  • Murray Smallwood known as lead digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Jessica Clare Smith known as digital artist: Animal Logic (as Jessica Smith)
  • Jason Snyman known as digital artist: MPC
  • Perry Hyunwoo Sohn known as 3D tracking/matchmove: Prime Focus VFX
  • Perry Hyunwoo Sohn known as 3d integration artist
  • Cameron Sonerson known as lead previsualization artist
  • Hwasup Song known as digital artist: MPC
  • Jeremy Spencer known as supervising assembly TD
  • Juri Stanossek known as division vfx supervisor: Pixomondo
  • Juri Stanossek known as visual effects production supervisor: Pixomondo
  • Debbie Steer known as visual effects production coordinator: Animal Logic
  • Debbie Steer known as visual effects production supervisor: Animal Logic
  • Daniel Stern known as effects artist: Pixomondo
  • Jeremy Stewart known as digital artist: Prime Focus
  • Susan Stewart known as digital matte painter: Prime Focus VFX
  • Jonathan Stone known as visual effects producer: Pixomondo LA
  • David Stopford known as effects technical director
  • Trevor Strand known as visual effects compositor
  • Moritz Strothmann known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Julien Stuart-Smith known as look development MPC
  • Jonas Stuckenbrock known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Frederick George Stuhrberg known as 3D scanning
  • Jesse Sturdy known as witness reference
  • Sung Wook Su known as digital artist: Prime Focus (as Sungwook Su)
  • Sung Wook Su known as visual effects artist: Pixomondo
  • Ethan Summers known as digital effect artist: Prime Focus
  • Haidong Sun known as 3d digital artists: Pixomondo
  • Richard Sur known as senior lighting technical director: Animal Logic
  • Lubos Gerardo Surzin known as matte painting/concept artist: Animal Logic (as Gerardo Surzin)
  • Emerick Tackett known as matchmover: Pixomondo
  • Sahil Tandial known as matchmove artist
  • Paul Taylor known as character animator: Pixomondo
  • Adam Teale known as digital compositor: Animal Logic
  • Anna Terekhova known as digital compositor: Prime Focus
  • Jeff Tetzlaff known as model / texture lead: Prime Focus Visual Effects
  • Mark Theriault known as visual effects artist
  • Gavyn Thompson known as lighting artist: Pixomondo LA (as Gavin Thompson)
  • Joel Thompson known as visual effects editor
  • Vivienne To known as creature designer
  • Joel Tong known as digital artist: MPC
  • Dave Tonnesen known as digital artist: MPC (as David Tonnesen)
  • Peter Toufidis known as senior matte painter: MPC
  • Nhat Phong Tran known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Phi Tran known as digital artist: Prime Focus VFX
  • Tong Tran known as 3d artist: Prime Focus
  • Adam Trowse known as digital compositor
  • Denis Trutanic known as track/matchmove artist: Pixomondo
  • Keith Patrick Turner known as previsualization artist: Prime Focus (as Keith Turner)
  • Randy Ui known as CG artist
  • Chris Uyede known as lead modeller
  • Manuel Valdez Mendia known as digital artist: MPC (as Manuel Valdez-Mendia)
  • Manuel Valdez-Mendia known as digital artist: MPC
  • Martijn van Herk known as technical director
  • Martijn van Herk known as visual effects artist
  • Bil Van Ness known as character animator
  • Vasantharajan.g.d known as matchmove artist
  • Hristo Velev known as digital effects artist
  • Sören Volz known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Ben Walker known as digital matte painter
  • Faye Walkington known as data operations
  • Kevin Wang known as motion editor
  • Xiaowei Wang known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Robert Ward known as visual effects artist
  • Kento Watanabe known as digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Tamara Watts Kent known as visual effects producer
  • Johannes Weiss known as track/matchmove artist: Pixomondo
  • Martin Wellstein known as 3d digital artists: Pixomondo
  • Bruno Werneck known as concept artist: Pixomondo
  • Genevieve West known as vfx producer: Prime Focus
  • Chad Wiebe known as digital effects supervisor: Prime Focus Visual Effects
  • Mark Williams known as senior rendering research and development engineer
  • Benjamin Wilson known as rotoscoper: Animal Logic
  • Judith Winkler known as visual effects coordinator: Pixomondo
  • Phil Wittmer known as digital artist: Animal Logic
  • Derek Wolfe known as digital artist: MPC
  • Chris Wood known as digital compositor: MPC
  • Wenjing Wu known as lead compositor: Pixomondo
  • Klaus Wuchta known as lead compositor: Pixomondo
  • Xye known as tracking
  • Tuba Yalcin known as effects technical director: MPC
  • Bo Yang known as visual effects production supervisor: Pixomondo
  • Yi Yang known as visual effects coordinator
  • Kelvin Yee known as visual effects production assistant
  • Ryan Yee known as senior animator
  • Teh-wei Yeh known as lighting technical director: MPC
  • Yangyang Yu known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Pouya Zadrafiei known as visual effects artist
  • Attila Zalanyi known as lead effects animator: Pixomondo
  • Riccardo Zanettini known as lighting lead/compositor: Pixomondo
  • Oliver Zangenberg known as character animator: Pixomondo
  • Eric Zhang known as digital artist: MPC
  • Haibing Zhang known as digital artist: Pixomondo
  • Le Zhang known as rotoscope/paint: Pixomondo
  • Longbiao Zhang known as 3D tracking/matchmove: Pixomondo
  • Peng Zhang known as 3D tracking/matchmove: Pixomondo
  • Bin Zheng known as rotoscope/paint: Pixomondo
  • Dioni Zhong known as software developer
  • Yan Zhou known as 3D tracking/matchmove: Pixomondo
  • Henrik Zähringer known as digital artist: Pixomondo
  • Tony Alexander known as senior lighting technical director: MPC (uncredited)
  • Brandon Bartlett known as cg supervisor: With A Twist Studio (uncredited)
  • Clemens Bast known as vfx intern: Pixomondo (uncredited)
  • Linus Burghardt known as compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
  • Frank Dzidowski known as matchmove artist (uncredited)
  • Ebru Gönül known as compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
  • Sven Hartmann known as visual effects editor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
  • Joni Jacobson known as executive producer: Pixomondo (uncredited)
  • Paul King known as vfx coordinator: Prime Focus (uncredited)
  • Paul LaFond known as matchmove artist (uncredited)
  • Natalie Meffert known as compositor: Pixomondo (uncredited)
  • Stephanie Molk known as visual effects artist: Animal Logic (uncredited)
  • An Nguyen known as software developer: Animal Logic (uncredited)
  • Matt Nowacki known as matchmove: With a Twist Studio (uncredited)
  • John F.K. Parenteau known as executive producer: Pixomondo (uncredited)
  • Will Reichelt known as digital supervisor: Animal Logic (uncredited))
  • Lorraine Rozon known as recruiter: Prime Focus VFX (uncredited)
  • Emil Stefanov known as digital effects artist: Pixomondo (uncredited)
  • Sonja Waldraff known as recruiter: Pixomondo (uncredited)
  • Marc W. Widmann known as vfx intern: Pixomondo (uncredited)
  • Benjamin Wilson known as rotoscope/paint artist (uncredited)
  • Christoph Zollinger known as visual effects coordinator: Pixomondo (uncredited)

Release Date:

  • Argentina 21 March 2011 (Buenos Aires)
  • Argentina 24 March 2011
  • Croatia 24 March 2011
  • Hungary 24 March 2011
  • Malaysia 24 March 2011
  • Netherlands 24 March 2011
  • Serbia 24 March 2011
  • Singapore 24 March 2011
  • Slovenia 24 March 2011
  • Brazil 25 March 2011
  • Bulgaria 25 March 2011
  • Canada 25 March 2011
  • Iceland 25 March 2011
  • India 25 March 2011
  • Italy 25 March 2011
  • Lithuania 25 March 2011
  • Mexico 25 March 2011
  • Philippines 25 March 2011
  • Poland 25 March 2011
  • Spain 25 March 2011
  • Taiwan 25 March 2011
  • USA 25 March 2011
  • Egypt 30 March 2011
  • France 30 March 2011
  • Belarus 31 March 2011
  • Czech Republic 31 March 2011
  • Germany 31 March 2011
  • Hong Kong 31 March 2011
  • Kazakhstan 31 March 2011
  • Portugal 31 March 2011
  • Russia 31 March 2011
  • Colombia 1 April 2011
  • Estonia 1 April 2011
  • Finland 1 April 2011 (Night Visions Film Festival)
  • Panama 1 April 2011
  • UK 1 April 2011
  • Australia 7 April 2011
  • Greece 7 April 2011
  • Peru 7 April 2011
  • South Korea 7 April 2011
  • Sweden 8 April 2011
  • Uruguay 8 April 2011
  • Venezuela 8 April 2011
  • Denmark 14 April 2011
  • Finland 15 April 2011
  • Japan 15 April 2011
  • Norway 15 April 2011
  • Turkey 15 April 2011
  • Israel 21 April 2011
  • Armenia 27 April 2011
  • Paraguay 24 June 2011

MPAA: Rated PG-13 for thematic material involving sexuality, violence and combat sequences, and for language

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Filmography links and data courtesy of The Internet Movie Database


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Posted on March 29, 2012 by Harry in Movies | Tags: , , , , .

10 Comments

  1. Mr Impossible from United States
    29 Mar 2012, 4:38 pm

    I personally enjoyed the film and I am a fan of Zack Snyder's previousfilms (Watchmen,300,and Dawn of the Dead). The visuals were pretty muchstunning with very few exceptions, but they are easily forgiven and notdistracting at all. The acting wasn't anything "Oscar" worthy, but thenagain it shouldn't be. The performances were very good for an actionfilm and I like it that way. This films definitely attracts the teenagemale demographics, who like action packed films filled with hot women.This film, however is not for everyone. Some people might not like CGI,some women might be offended that this film is very shallow, violent,and very degrading towards women.This is definitely the type of movieyou'll either love or hate.

    My only problem with the movie is that the story doesn't seem fullyrealized… If you want to keep me interested you will need a lot morethan 20 minutes of fantasy CGI sequences sprinkled throughout a 120minute trek However go in this movie expecting to have a lot of fun!Overall the movie has stunning visuals, great action scenes, andworthwhile acting. I definitely recommend this movie to people lookingto have a good time.

  2. johnnymacbest from United States
    29 Mar 2012, 4:38 pm

    With 300, Zack Snyder has made it abundantly clear that his moviesdazzle they eyes, indeed they do, but his characters never engage theaudience in a personal and emotional level. And Sucker Punch is justthat. A visually dazzling collage of mental insanity taken to theextreme with a fairly interesting premise that looks promising on thesurface, but never truly lets you sink your teeth into the innerworkings of the main character.

    Emily Browning plays Babydoll, a blond bombshell who is placed in amental institution by her cold stepfather, and is then seen trying topersuade the orderlies into lobotomizing her to keep her from givingdetails surrounding a tragedy in her life. However, Babydoll begins tocreate a dreamworld in which not only to pass the time, but to figure away out of the asylum.

    As if that makes any sense whatsoever, here are the main problems withSucker Punch that's been plaguing modern cinema; no plot and characterdevelopment. Barely any of the characters that the protagonist meetsare developed. They're just static talking heads spouting out linesthat are trying to hammer into the audience that they are more thanjust cliché's and cardboard cutouts. The acting feels stiff andartificial with no sense of tension or suspense. You never feel thatthe characters are in real danger of any kind. It just goes thru themotions and despite having a nice premise to go on, the film feels likea half-ass-ed attempt to be something new and fresh.

    Sucker Punch has some merits. The special effects and action scenes areimpressive. I did get a kick out of some of the battle scenes which arenicely choreographed and executed with lots of explosions. Watching itis sort of like looking at a silent film on steroids but minus theheart and soul of that bygone era.

    The incredible aesthetic beauty and action choreography are a lotimpressive than Snyder's 300. But the problem with Sucker Punch is thateven in a fantasy film, or any action film for that matter, you have toput effort into making the audience care for your characters no matterhow good looking the action and special effects are. You simply won'tcare who lives or dies in this film. At some point, you have to try tomake the audience care. This film simply never does.

    I think that I got my point across perfectly clear regarding this film.If it entertained you, fine, then it did it's job. The problem is isthat there's nothing remotely remarkable about this film aside from thevisual aspect of this film. If more time was spent fleshing out thestory, characters, with a more coherent script, then this could've beena really good film. But since so much potential was utterly wasted, Ihave no choice but to give my grade and it's a D.

  3. play_burnman from Sacramento
    29 Mar 2012, 4:38 pm

    Here's the thing about this movie, its demanding. You have to be ableto let go, realize that it's stylized after a modern comic book (of theadult genre), and just go with the movie. Let it take you on its ride,which is a beautiful/wonderful thing.

    You also have to pay attention. This movie is layered in metaphor andis way more cerebral than one might expect. You have to work tounderstand what's going on and part of that work is letting it take youaway.

    If you can do this, and your friends can do this, you will have hoursof conversation afterwards about what it all means, what the metaphorsmean, and what was actually happening in the 'prime' reality of theinsane asylum.

    If you can't do this you will probably think the movie is stupid,contrived, and pointless. But you would be wrong.

    Oh…and beyond all that stuff above…the fight scenes are an absolutenerdgasm, a sci-fi/fantasy orgy of epic proportions.

    Steam-punk Nazi Zombies… I came out of that movie feeling like I justhad a threesome with Isaac Asimov and Anne McCaffery.

    I absolutely loved it.

  4. drmcninja17 from Washington State, United States
    29 Mar 2012, 4:38 pm

    I recently saw Sucker Punch at an advance screening and thoroughlyenjoyed it. To be honest, I am the target demographic here. I'm a guyin his twenties who plays video games and enjoys fantasy movies andaction…. but this is a decent film overall. It appeals to my"sensible adult" side that appreciates a good, well written film, withgreat directing, great acting, and overall good cinematography. It alsoappeals to my "twenty-something male" side that loves sexy ladies,guns, killer robots, dragons, samurai and swordplay. The abundant CG isstunningly beautiful and doesn't feel overdone or become visuallyexhausting like some movies. This movie gets me. and I know that therewill be a good number of people who dislike this movie, dismissing itas juvenile, or stupid. who dislike the amount of CGI used in thismovie. I don't care… I love this movie for exactly what it is… agood movie that appeals to me in every way.

  5. GeneR777 from United States
    29 Mar 2012, 4:38 pm

    I originally wrote a review the day after I saw Sucker Punch. I pannedit. To me my initial feelings were rather lukewarm at best.

    But then I gave it some time.

    And as I went through my days afterward my mind would wander back tothe story and think about the visual food for thought.

    Yeah, the girls are hot. Yeah, the action is over the top, but if youlook at the emotional landscape that is being explored in a moreliteral fashion via the action then yeah, this is a pretty cool idea.

    Sometimes films come along that are a "sucker punch" in terms oforiginality. The general public usually reacts negatively to it whichleads to poor box office results. But later on the audience has had achance to digest what was given and revisits the film and breaths newlife into it.

    My prediction is that such a situation will happen with Sucker Punch.It'll probably not recoup its initial budget at the box office. Peoplewill flood the IMDb forum with reasons why it did not work. We willprobably see about a few dozen threads at least where people will venttheir reasons why they hate the film and why you too should not see it.

    But given some time it will recoup via video sales and otherdistribution deals.

    Why?

    Because it's still a solid story. The style of the movie is an Otaku'swet dream, but overall result is still the same: it does surprise andgive ample food for thought.

    Think of it as stylized parable about repression, personal will andsacrifice. Because sooner or later after all the negative backlash andreviews blow by those emotional messages will be all that will be left.

    And people will remember it for that reason.

  6. gregeichelberger from San Diego
    29 Mar 2012, 4:38 pm

    This film could not be more appropriately titled. I was a "sucker" topay good money to see this slop, and I felt like "punching"writer/producer/director Zach Snyder for putting me (and many others)through it.

    In addition to Snyder's ("Watchman," "300")"point-the-camera-and-get-away" direction, there's the horrid acting (aterm I use more than loosely) of Emily Browning and others. Add to thatthe convoluted storyline and not-so-special effects, and you easilyhave one of the worst movies of the year.

    What small plot this picture has features Babydoll (Browning) as a muchabused stepdaughter placed in a "Shutter Island"-type 1950s mentalinstitution. There, she meets a group of equally terrible actresses andbegins her flights of fantasy. Browning seems to have one expression, asad-sack, dopey-eyed, head-cocked look that makes Anna Faris' thespianabilities look like Katharine Hepburn's.

    With this group, she delves into an "Inception"-like world ofmulti-layered dimensions, fighting giant killer robots, massivezeppelins, German zombies from World War I. These scenes are all onebig CGI mess that – to some, I suppose – are going to appearimpressive, but when all is said and done give the (intelligent) viewerone large headache.

    Meanwhile, an oriental-like wise man (Scott Glenn, "The Right Stuff,""Hunt For Red October") waxes philosophical about finding a map, a key,fire, a knife and other mundane items which are supposed to make thisfilm somewhat deep. Glenn, by the way, only was considered for thisrole because David Carradine had passed away.

    To waste any more words on this slick piece of garbage would only serveto justify Snyder's pathetic vision of titillating teenage males byenticing them them with nearly bare-breasted, violent adolescent girlswith guns and martial arts skills.

    Take my advice here; unless you're a confused young women with angerand appearance issues, or a horny 14-year old boy, avoid this movielike the bubonic plague. No matter what kind of money you save by doingso, eventually, you will thank me for it.

  7. movedout from http://thescreenbug.blogspot.com
    29 Mar 2012, 4:38 pm

    "Sucker Punch," the latest barrage on the senses from writer-directorZack Snyder ("300", "Watchmen") is his first film that's based on hisown source material. And it proves to be quite stunning definition ofpop filmmaking. In a triumphant marriage of style and tone, Snyder hascreated his own "Kill Bill" by going deep down into the rabbit hole. Aglorious pastiche of colour, CGI and kinesis, "Sucker Punch" eventhrough its obvious flaws, has set a new bar for graphic storytellingthat attempts to transplant the purity of imagination onto the cinemascreen.

    Essentially cohering around a simple premise — hot chicks kicking assand taking names, the film's bravura opening charts Baby Doll's (EmilyBrowning) institutionalisation by a wicked stepfather after hermother's death and her introduction to the asylum where damaged youngwomen are sent to be kept away from society. She meets thepeople-in-charge, Blue (Oscar Isaac) and Dr. Gorski (Carla Gugino) aswell as the other girls in the institute: Rocket (Jena Malone) and hersister Sweet Pea (Abbie Cornish), Amber (Jamie Chung) and Blondie(Vanessa Hudgens).

    The story that follows Baby Doll reveals a larger canvas of a clevernarrative conceit that coincides three realities together ("Inception"comparisons, tread lightly); the first being the asylum, the second isa burlesque brothel run by Blue and trained by Gorski and the final andmost resplendent one is Baby Doll's hyper reverie focused on destroyingthe forces of evil — be it shogun titans, zombie Nazis or killerandroids. The darker the reality preceding it, the deeper and morerisky the wormhole of fantasies go. There is a real sense, despite itstremendous parade of visual set-pieces that Snyder wanted a narrativestrong enough to endure the weight of spectacle, and in many respectshe has. He uses the age-old device of character quests to propel theplot, peppering it with familiar consequences until he doesn't. Theflow culminates in an intriguing final act that sets it a mark higherthan anyone would have expected, or even needed from a film thatalready proudly wears its stripes as pure escapist entertainment.

    Snyder goes the way of Tarantino in appropriating and amalgamatingartistic and stylistic influences from the most conspicuous of genresand mediums. Within the real world or whatever the relative equivalentof what exists in this film's dark and twisty tone, the film usestemplates in the vein of sexploitation female prison grind-housefeatures from the 60s and 70s like "Love Camp 7", "99 Women", "CagedHeat" and the grandmother of them all, 1950's "Caged". As the filmprogresses into its action-oriented enterprises, it quickly recalls thedizzying array of cut-scenes from video-games and punk anime-styledesign in how it encompasses the digital environment. Snyder's thematicgoal is to situate the idea of imagination as a coping mechanism forterror, a concept seen recently in "Pan's Labyrinth" and "Tideland".The landscape of the mind is uniquely realised here by Snyder, whoetches a remarkable amount of detail into each CGI frame, anhyperbolised celebration of artifice and invention that is at oncemagnificent and exhilarating as it is compelling and spellbinding.

    Werner Herzog once posited that the dearth of new and unique imagerythat do not reflect the times we live in will be the death ofcivilisation. If anything, "Sucker Punch" truly defines the generationof filmmaking we exist in — a sophisticated and passionate emblem thatdelivers an overload of sugar high through the ideals of creating andmaintaining a creative medley of pop-culture influences, bridgedtogether with keen commercial sensibilities. Suddenly, Snyder holdingon to the helms of the next Superman film makes more sense than it everdid.

  8. smhb_inc from United States
    29 Mar 2012, 4:38 pm

    Even with millions of bullets flying through the air, dozens of swordsswinging & the hundreds of punches these hotties take, not one of thesegirls ever gets a single scratch during the battles. After the firstbrawl pitting the Girls Club against steam-powered Germans & ferociousshooting planes it's so painfully obvious that none of the girls willbe in any real danger that the big budget special effects are justfluff & overkill. What's the point of all the bullets & bad guys if thechicks are indestructible? By the second battle it's just so irritatingwatching these females punch, kick, shoot, jump & slice their waythrough crowds of bad guys when they could have just walked & notgotten hurt. The story is clever but watching chicks that fight again &again & can't possibly be defeated is not one-tenth as interesting aswatching people who can actually die in battle.

  9. zetes from Saint Paul, MN
    29 Mar 2012, 4:38 pm

    A crime against the cinema. It's too bad. I honestly have enjoyed ZackSnyder's films in the past, besides that crappy owl movie he made lastyear. I'd classify them more as guilty pleasures than actual goodmovies, but I found them entertaining and neat to look at. SuckerPunch, though, combines all his worst traits and adds a script that hehimself wrote (along with co-writer Steve Shibuya). His previous filmswere all adaptations, three of picture books and one a remake of aGeorge A. Romero classic. He didn't have to think much himself to makethose neat images. Sucker Punch demonstrates that he just doesn't havethe ability to think of things himself. It's a movie that combinesmental hospitals, burlesque shows, giant samurai warriors,half-mechanical zombie-Nazis, mech suits, orcs, dragons, killer robots,and atomic bombs, pretty much every cool thing one can think of.

    And then one might guess that the problem is overkill. It isn't (well,that may be a smaller problem). The major problem is that there's not asingle thing we haven't seen before here. Also, the plot is created inthe worst possible way. The skeleton of it is pretty much identical toInception. While this film had to have been conceived beforehand, soyou can't blame it for ripping Nolan's film off, that's just one morestrike against it. Emily Browning plays a girl who accidentally killsher sister while trying to defend her from her rampaging stepfather.She's sent to a mental hospital, where she hides behind two levels ofreality. In the first level down, she's the new girl at a burlesquehouse/whorehouse. Snyder inserts a very video game-esque premise: sheand her hooker friends (Abbie Cornish, Jena Malone, Vanessa Hudgens andJamie Chung) are basically sex slaves, and they must find five objectsto help them escape. Now, up to this point, the film is tolerable. It'snot good, but it's watchable. The girls are very attractive, and thevisuals are kind of old-fashioned and nice to look at.

    But here comes the third level: whenever the girls are about to stealthe next thing they need to escape, they all descend into a fantasyworld which is about the most video game-like thing to ever appear in amovie. Well, kind of. There was Scott Pilgrim vs. the World last year.That one actually used video games in a clever, metaphorical way, andit did it with its tongue in its cheek. Snyder really thinks we want towatch people play video games on the big screen. The worst thing was,after I experienced the abject horrors of how boring this couldpossibly be the first time, I realized I was going to have to sitthrough this same thing four more times. Oh, these sequences are beyondawful, with these girls fighting through dozens ofnot-very-great-looking CGI Nazis, robots, orcs, whatever. This is theworst parts of every event movie of the past decade mashed intonever-ending sequences. There's nothing logical about the existence ofthese sequences. The funny thing is, in that second level of reality,while these fantasy sequences are going on, Browning is dancing sexilyin front of whomever the girls want to distract. I think Snyder had tohave known that the premise that this girl is such a sexy dancer thatanyone watching her would be so utterly distracted that the other girlscould steal from them was laughably ridiculous. But, watching themovie, I'm not so sure he was smart enough to realize this. He's alsonot smart enough to realize that the audience this film was intendedfor would probably rather be watching the girl dance sexily than watchthese hot girls play video games in front of us.

    While these video game sequences are some of the worst cinema I've everexperienced, and about the worst bit of narrative, as well, Snyderisn't done completely screwing up. He completely miscalculates whichcharacters the audience gives a damn about. He also doesn't make anysense of the connection between the first and second levels of reality(we'll thankfully forget about the third), and characters whom we metin the second level but not in the first aren't able to connect to theaudience when we meet them there. The film ends with a character whomwe don't know and don't give a crap about. And then I stand up and fleethe theater, and it's all I can do not to start a riot in the lobby.

  10. scotthad from United States
    29 Mar 2012, 4:38 pm

    I'm not sure how this movie got such rave reviews by some people, ohwait yes I can, the ONLY people who can possibly like this film arefantasy/anime/comic book junkies!

    Where do I begin… First and foremost, the biggest upset of this movieis the plot, which flip flopped back and forth, with no real point orpurpose for the most part – and not in a creative/unique way. The plotstarts off in some wannabe 'Inception' idea, with a fantasy inside afantasy. Baby Girl goes from about to get a lobotomy (odd enough as itis), to going to a story inside a story, which ends with the lobotomyending (basically the story in between the lobotomy was never explainedoutside the fantasy, and couldn't have happened since the lobotomyhappened from the beginning of her entering the insane asylum).

    Now for the second level of the story: So Baby Girl and her pose aretrying to escape their slavery from the burlesque/whore house, and theymust obtain 4 items and a "mystery" in order to escape, which is allfine and good. However, in the process of obtaining these items, BabyGirl and/or her pose enter the third fantasy/story aspect of the film,which is COMPLETELY NON RELATED TO ANY OTHER ASPECT OF THE FILM, and isreplaced with pretty much every popular fantasy/fiction battle scenefrom the last 30 years of movie history. From a generic samuraisword/battle battle, to a Nazi war scene with some mech machines, to ascene literally right out of Lord of the Rings with Orcs, a castle, anddragons, to a Unstoppable(runaway train scene)/Matrix/Terminator/Defusea bomb scene, the plot is a mess! I was waiting for some fairies, elfs,werewolves, vampires, or unicorns to come up next, but I'm sure theyare saving those for sucker punch 2!

    Aside from the plot, there were some other major issues. The soundtrackconsisted of about 3 songs (or at least the same artist since they allsounded the same), It was so predictable that there would be nothingbut hard chick rock. I think the movie tried way too hard to emphasizethe hardcore, tough chick act; yet they still always have to have womenlook like little sex dolls when they battle, with perfect makeup, titshanging out, and short skirts.

    The volume of the audio was WAY off, in some dialog scenes the wordswere barely audible, yet in the battle scenes, the sound was so loudthat you couldn't even think, and after the movie my ears were ringingas if I were standing right next to the speaker at a Metallica concert.I even plugged my ears at some points to attempt to save my hearing,and I could still hear the sound perfectly. I'm sorry but blastingmusic does NOT make a movie better.

    I typically enjoy fantasy/super hero movies, but this one failed on alllevels for me. I feel there was almost no effort in the writing of thismovie, almost as if it were an after thought. The actors all seemedsecond rate, the crying was clearly fake and lacked emotion. OscarIsaac seemed like he was trying too hard to be like Joker from Batman,yet he showed no genuine emotion in the scene where he executes the twogirls (that execution scene had no place in this film, it made nosense, look around the theater after this scene and you will see mostpeople scratching their head).

    If I could rate the CG alone, it's easily an 8 or 9 out of 10, but theterrible plot, mediocre acting, and overblown-everything ruined it forme. If you honestly enjoy this movie, you have to be lying to yourself,or foolishly attempting to defend it based solely on the fact that ithas fantasy/comic book aspects.

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