RoboCop (2014) Poster

RoboCop (2014)

  • Rate: 6.7/10 total 15,897 votes 
  • Genre: Action | Crime | Sci-Fi | Thriller
  • Release Date: 12 February 2014 (USA)
  • Runtime: 108 min
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RoboCop (2014)

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  • IMDb page: RoboCop (2014)
  • Rate: 6.7/10 total 15,897 votes 
  • Genre: Action | Crime | Sci-Fi | Thriller
  • Release Date: 12 February 2014 (USA)
  • Runtime: 108 min
  • Filming Location: Pinewood Toronto Studios, Port Lands, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Budget: $100,000,000 (estimated)
  • Gross: $26,400,000 (USA) (14 February 2014)
  • Director: José Padilha
  • Stars: Joel Kinnaman, Gary Oldman, Michael Keaton | See full cast and crew »
  • Original Music By: Pedro Bromfman   
  • Soundtrack: Hocus Pocus
  • Sound Mix: SDDS | Datasat | Dolby Digital
  • Plot Keyword: Technology | Robocop | Drone | Police | Robot

Writing Credits By:

  • Joshua Zetumer (screenplay)
  • Edward Neumeier (1987 screenplay) &
  • Michael Miner (1987 screenplay)

Known Trivia

  • Director Jose Padilha and actor Joel Kinnaman fought hard for an R rating, but due to the ever expanding budget, which went from a modest $60 million budget and ballooned to a $120 million budget, studio executives were forced to deliver a PG-13 rating in hopes to recoup the budget they had spent on the film. Throughout the course of filming, studio executives kept a close eye on Padilha, making sure he was going to deliver a PG-13 rating. 46 of 46 found this interesting Interesting? YesNo |
  • According to Brazilian director Fernando Meirelles, José Padilha called to him during production to admit he was having “the worst experience of his life” and “for every ten ideas he has, nine are cut. The film will be good, but I have never suffered so much and I do not want to do it again.” 47 of 49 found this interesting Interesting? YesNo |
  • When Sellars (Michael Keaton) is reviewing the draft design for the robosuit, the design displayed is the suit from RoboCop (1987). Sellars then requests that the design be “more tactical” and “black”, resulting in the updated design for this film. 72 of 78 found this interesting Interesting? YesNo |
  • Edward Norton turned down the role of Norton. 56 of 64 found this interesting Interesting? YesNo |
  • Michael Fassbender, Matthias Schoenaerts, and Russell Crowe were considered to play RoboCop. 51 of 58 found this interesting Interesting? YesNo |
  • During production of the film, director José Padilha phoned friend and fellow Brazilian director Fernando Meirelles to confide in him his frustration in the lack of creative control he was allowed by the studio for the project. Padilha estimated that for every ten ideas he brought to the project, the studio refused nine, and went on to the describe the making of the film as “The worst experience of [his] life”. When word of this conversation became public, in an effort to appease the studio Padilha released counter statements expressing satisfaction with the film. 27 of 30 found this interesting Interesting? YesNo |
  • Jackie Earle Haley as Rick Maddox at one point says ‘I wouldn’t buy that for a dollar’. This is a reworking of a line in the original 1987 film during a fake advertisement with the catchphrase ‘I’d buy that for a dollar’. 18 of 21 found this interesting Interesting? YesNo |
  • This is the first Hollywood film by Brazilian director José Padilha. 11 of 12 found this interesting Interesting? YesNo |
  • Hugh Laurie was in talks to play the role of Raymond Sellars, but contract negotiations broke down between him and the film’s producers. Clive Owen was seriously considered as a replacement before Michael Keaton was cast. 22 of 30 found this interesting Interesting? YesNo |
  • Darren Aronofsky was attached to direct at one point. 20 of 27 found this interesting Interesting? YesNo |

Goofs: Continuity: Takes place in Detroit, Michigan but Toronto's CN Tower and Canadian flags are visible when Robocop is on his motorcycle on the highway.

Plot: In 2028 Detroit, when Alex Murphy (Joel Kinnaman) – a loving husband, father and good cop – is critically injured in the line of duty, the multinational conglomerate OmniCorp sees their chance for a part-man, part-robot police officer. Full summary » |  »

Story: In RoboCop, the year is 2028 and multinational conglomerate OmniCorp is at the center of robot technology. Overseas, their drones have been used by the military for years – and it’s meant billions for OmniCorp’s bottom line. Now OmniCorp wants to bring their controversial technology to the home front, and they see a golden opportunity to do it. When Alex Murphy (Joel Kinnaman) – a loving husband, father and good cop doing his best to stem the tide of crime and corruption in Detroit – is critically injured in the line of duty, OmniCorp sees their chance for a part-man, part-robot police officer. OmniCorp envisions a RoboCop in every city and even more billions for their shareholders, but they never counted on one thing: there is still a man inside the machine pursuing justice. Written bySony Pictures Entertainment

Synopsis

Synopsis: In RoboCop, the year is 2029 and multinational conglomerate OmniCorp is at the center of robot technology. Their drones are winning American wars around the globe and now they want to bring this technology to the home front. Alex Murphy is a loving husband, father and good cop doing his best to stem the tide of crime and corruption in Detroit. After he is critically injured in the line of duty, OmniCorp utilizes their remarkable science of robotics to save Alexs life. He returns to the streets of his beloved city with amazing new abilities, but with issues a regular man has never had to face before.

 

FullCast & Crew

Produced By:

  • Marc Abraham known as producer
  • Gary Barber known as producer (unconfirmed)
  • Roger Birnbaum known as executive producer
  • Bill Carraro known as executive producer
  • Brad Fischer known as producer
  • Mike Medavoy known as producer (unconfirmed)
  • Arnold Messer known as producer (unconfirmed)
  • Eric Newman known as producer

FullCast & Crew:

  • Joel Kinnaman known as Alex Murphy / RoboCop
  • Gary Oldman known as Dr. Dennett Norton
  • Michael Keaton known as Raymond Sellars
  • Abbie Cornish known as Clara Murphy
  • Jackie Earle Haley known as Rick Mattox
  • Michael K. Williams known as Jack Lewis
  • Jennifer Ehle known as Liz Kline
  • Jay Baruchel known as Tom Pope
  • Marianne Jean-Baptiste known as Chief Karen Dean
  • Samuel L. Jackson known as Pat Novak
  • Aimee Garcia known as Jae Kim
  • Douglas Urbanski known as Mayor Durant
  • John Paul Ruttan known as David Murphy
  • Patrick Garrow known as Antoine Vallon
  • K.C. Collins known as Andre Daniels
  • Daniel Kash known as John Lake
  • Zach Grenier known as Senator Hubert Dreyfuss
  • Maura Grierson known as Kelly
  • Stewart Arnott known as Senate House Leader
  • Matt Cook known as General Monroe
  • Steve Cumyn known as Ohio Senator
  • Noorin Gulamgaus known as Navid
  • Marjan Neshat known as Sayeh
  • Meysam Motazedi known as Arash
  • Khaliya Hosein known as Iranian Child
  • Savana Hosein known as Iranian Child
  • Philip Akin known as Dr. Alan
  • Paul Haywood known as Man in White Coat
  • Adrian Griffin known as Man in White Coat
  • Rick Hughes known as Man in White Coat
  • Raffi Altounian known as Man with Prosthetics Playing Guitar
  • Melanie Scrofano known as Wife of Man with Prosthetics
  • Kelvin Wheeler known as Old Sergeant
  • Alex Mallari Jr. known as Young Lieutenant
  • Dwayne McLean known as Thomas King
  • Tattiawna Jones known as Mayor's Assistant
  • Wayne Downer known as Marcus
  • Robert Thomas known as John Biggs
  • Jordan Johnson-Hinds known as Jerry White
  • Ian Peters known as Jerry's Gang
  • Ricardo Betancourt known as Jerry's Gang
  • Evan Stern known as Walter Karrel
  • Ishan Morris known as Armed Sentry at Decrepit House (as Ish Morris)
  • Ambrose Wong known as Parts Room Technician
  • Mark McKay known as Detroit Lab Technician
  • Aurora Browne known as Female Cop
  • Rory O'Shea known as Cop at Armoury
  • Shondra Kayd known as Uniformed Cop Inside Station
  • Stacey Unsworth known as Uniformed Cop Outside Station
  • Jeana Lowes known as Cop Who Greets Murphy
  • Kanu Giddings known as Cop Who Greets Murphy
  • Tamara Almeida known as Cop Who Greets Murphy
  • Shane Invervary known as Cop Who Greets Murphy
  • Paul Sun-Hyung Lee known as Omnicorp Technician
  • Thomas Mitchell known as Omnicorp Technician
  • Ian Butcher known as Head of Omnicorp Security
  • Rocky Anderson known as Lead Omnicorp Security Agent
  • Dalias Blake known as Omnicorp Security Agent
  • Barry Nerling known as Omnicorp Exterior Security
  • Dean Redman known as Omnicorp Exterior Security
  • Demord Dann known as Omnicorp Security
  • Darcy Hinds known as Omnicorp Security
  • Sean Francis known as Omnicorp Security Guard
  • Steve Wright known as Pilot
  • Kirby Morrow known as Co-Pilot
  • David Harcourt known as PCP Man
  • Kevin Hare known as Rapist
  • Carlyn Burchell known as Rape Victim
  • Markus Parilo known as Sweet Man
  • Jessica Booker known as Sweet Man's Mom
  • Joe Merritt known as Pedestrian
  • Raiden Eastman known as Hostage Child
  • Aaliyah Cinello known as Little Girl
  • Meghan Hoople known as Teacher
  • Prince Massey known as Homeless Man
  • Mark Baldesarra known as Police Sergeant (uncredited)
  • Jason Bigio known as Police Officer (uncredited)
  • Tommy Chang known as Korean Store Owner (uncredited)
  • Jimmy Chimarios known as Robot Drone (uncredited)
  • Raven Cinello known as Mom (uncredited)
  • Brian Cranstone known as Forklift Operator (uncredited)
  • Tazito Garcia known as Football Player (uncredited)
  • WBBrown II known as AC Freeman (uncredited)
  • Diezel Ramos known as S.W.A.T Team Member (uncredited)
  • Jon Rhys known as S.W.A.T Team Member (uncredited)
  • Rebecca Rodley known as Jogger (uncredited)
  • Azra Valani known as Middle Eastern Woman (uncredited)
  • Joe Vercillo known as 208 (uncredited)
  • Joshua William James known as Onlooker / University Student (uncredited)
  • Peter Yan known as Iranian Terrorist (uncredited)

..

 

Supporting Department

Makeup Department:
  • Allan A. Apone known as makeup artist: Samuel L. Jackson
  • Cliona Furey known as head hair stylist: second unit
  • Lee Gren known as graphic designer specialty tattoos: Tinsley Studio
  • Maribeth Knezev known as makeup department head: second unit
  • Ana Lozano known as head of department: second unit
  • Angela Maldone known as makeup artist
  • Kelly Shanks known as assistant hair stylist

Art Department:

  • Darleen Abbott known as construction accountant
  • Kathleen Abbott known as construction pa
  • Colin Adams known as set dresser
  • Mike Barton known as set designer
  • David Best known as assistant art director
  • Joseph Bower known as key scenic picture car sculptor
  • Cameron S. Brooke known as key scenic artist
  • Robert C. Brooke known as lead scenic artist
  • Duncan Campbell known as assistant head carpenter
  • Carlos Caneca known as leadman
  • William Cheng known as set designer
  • Brian Cranstone known as on set carpenter
  • David DiCorpo known as assistant head carpenter
  • Lisle Fehlauer known as set dresser
  • Warren Flanagan known as concept artist
  • Tim Flattery known as concept artist
  • David G. Fremlin known as first assistant art director
  • Vladislav Fyodorov known as set designer
  • Lauren Geaghan known as art department coordinator
  • Sonia Gemmiti known as second assistant art director
  • Jeremy Gillespie known as assistant art director
  • Andrew Glavina known as signwriter
  • Nazgol Goshtasbpour known as consultant
  • Jonathan Graham known as mold maker
  • Matthew Hallett known as head welder
  • Chris Hanson known as shop specialist
  • Scott Holburn known as on-set dresser
  • Frank Hong known as illustrator
  • Alexandra Hooper known as set decoration buyer
  • Michael Huschka known as property master: second unit
  • Kevin Hutchinson known as art department crew
  • Catherine Ircha known as assistant art director
  • Thomas Iwan known as lead welder
  • Alexandra Jastrzembska known as art department assistant
  • Robert Andrew Johnson known as digital set designer
  • Jeff Julian known as concept designer
  • Jay Kirk known as key scenic artist: second unit
  • Lizzy Jane Klein known as art department researcher
  • Igor Knezevic known as concept illustrator
  • Stefany Koutroumpis known as assistant art director
  • Ray Lai known as concept illustrator
  • Ray Lai known as props
  • Kevin Lise known as assistant property master
  • John Mackenzie known as construction coordinator
  • Jim Martin known as illustrator
  • Rob McCallum known as storyboard artist
  • Kari Measham known as set decoration buyer
  • Jeffrey A. Melvin known as assistant set decorator
  • Matt Middleton known as set designer
  • John Moran known as graphic designer
  • Ed Natividad known as conceptual designer
  • Steve Newburn known as props
  • Ken Palkow known as prop fabricator
  • Dave Palmer known as head carpenter: 2nd unit
  • Amy Perron known as set dresser
  • Sorin Popescu known as set designer
  • Victor 'Chikko' Quon known as assistant head painter
  • Jamie Rama known as illustrator
  • Dave Rosa known as head painter
  • Maury Ruiz known as concept artist: Eddie Yang Studios
  • Robert Shipman known as props
  • Ken Sinclair known as set dresser (2014)
  • Dan Sissons known as property master: reshoot
  • Jerry Staar known as props: second unit, additional photography
  • Jonathon Stanton known as set dresser
  • Jamie Staples known as assistant shop specialist
  • Kevin Tomecek known as construction buyer
  • Brian van de Valk known as head carpenter
  • Paul Wagner known as assistant property master: re-shoot
  • Zoey Wang known as art department assistant
  • Evan Webber known as set designer
  • Joe Wolkosky known as set designer
  • Toni Wong known as set dresser
  • Dave Wood known as assistant art director
  • Colin Woods known as assistant art director
  • Levi Woods known as assistant property master: additional photography, Vancouver
  • Eddie Yang known as concept artist
  • Milena Zdravkovic known as concept artist
  • Emerson Doerksen known as scenic artist: vehicles (uncredited)

..

 

Company

Production Companies:

  • Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) (presents) (as Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures)
  • Columbia Pictures (presents)
  • Strike Entertainment

Other Companies:

  • Airstar America  grip and lighting equipment
  • Canada Film Capital  tax incentive consulting services
  • Dolby Laboratories  sound mix
  • EFilm  digital intermediate
  • Movie Armaments Group  wardrobe
  • Movie Armaments Group  weapons and props
  • Pictorvision  Eclipse aerial camera system
  • Picturecars North  picture vehicle supplier
  • Pinewood Toronto Studios  sound stages
  • Pivotal Post  Avid HD editing equipment
  • Reder & Feig  production counsel
  • Revival 629  exterior sets
  • Scarlet Letters  main and end credits
  • Sony Classical  soundtrack
  • Wildfire Studios  adr recording facility
  • William F. White International  grip and lighting equipment

Distributors:

  • Cocinsa (2014) (Nicaragua) (theatrical)
  • Columbia Pictures (2014) (USA) (theatrical)
  • Feelgood Entertainment (2014) (Greece) (theatrical)
  • Forum Hungary (2014) (Hungary) (theatrical)
  • Sony Pictures Entertainment (2014) (Japan) (theatrical)
  • Sony Pictures Releasing Canada (2014) (Canada) (theatrical)
  • Sony Pictures Releasing (2014) (Australia) (theatrical)
  • Sony Pictures Releasing (2014) (Netherlands) (theatrical) (through Universal Pictures International)
  • Sony Pictures Releasing (2014) (Singapore) (theatrical)
  • Sony Pictures Releasing (2014) (USA) (theatrical)
  • StudioCanal (2014) (Germany) (theatrical)
  • StudioCanal (2014) (France) (theatrical)
  • StudioCanal (2014) (UK) (theatrical)
  • Svensk Filmindustri (SF) (2014) (Sweden) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2014) (Argentina) (theatrical)
  • Universal Pictures International (UPI) (2014) (Netherlands) (theatrical) (through)
  • Walt Disney Studios Sony Pictures Releasing (WDSSPR) (2014) (Russia) (theatrical)
  • 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment (2014) (USA) (DVD)
  • 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment (2014) (USA) (DVD) (Blu-ray)
  • Zon Audiovisuais (2014) (Portugal) (all media)

..

 

Other Stuff

Special Effects:

  • Basilic Fly Studio (additional visual effects)
  • Cinesite
  • Framestore
  • Gentle Giant Studios
  • Industrial Pixel VFX (lidar and cyber scanning)
  • Legacy Effects ("Robocop" character costumes and robotic effects)
  • Method Studios (visual effects) (as Method Studios Vancouver)
  • Modus Fx (visual effects)
  • Mr. X
  • Peanut FX (matchmove)
  • Soho VFX (visual effects)

Visual Effects by:

  • Yunmi Ahn known as roto artist
  • Khan Ahsan known as motion tracking artist
  • Nadia Alaskari known as matchmove artist: Framestore
  • Kaevski Aleksandar known as matchmove: fx3x
  • Krista Allain known as visual effects coordinator
  • Rene Allegretti known as track/matchmove artist
  • Michael Allen known as compositor: cinesite
  • Dan Alterman known as compositor: Cinesite
  • Doug Appleton known as designer/animator
  • Alfredo Octavio Arango known as tracking artist: Mr.X inc
  • Luke Armstrong known as digital compositor: Framestore
  • Joel Ashman known as senior compositor: Yu&Co
  • Adam Azmy known as digital compositor: Framestore
  • Sam Baker known as animator: Mr. X
  • Berj Bannayan known as visual effects supervisor
  • Neill Barrack known as paint & roto lead artist: Framestore
  • Scott Bartels known as matchmove artist
  • Dan Batt known as paint and roto: Framestore
  • Paul Beaudry known as motion graphics designer
  • Barb Benoit known as digital compositor
  • Krista Benson known as digital compositor
  • Siobhan Bentley known as production manager: Framestore
  • Michael Blain known as senior research & development engineer
  • Sandro Blattner known as sequence lead: Method Studios LA
  • Francois Bleibel known as pipeline technical director
  • Ian Blewitt known as lead design compositor: yU+co
  • Fabrizia Bonaventura known as lighting td
  • Damien Bouvier known as matchmove artist: Peanut FX
  • Jamie Bowers known as texture artist: Method Studios LA
  • Matt Boyer known as lead matchmove artist: Cinesite
  • Richard Boyle known as character rigger: Cinesite
  • Dan Brittain known as digital compositor
  • Hugo Brunet Gauvreau known as visual effects artist (as Hugo Brunet)
  • Lee Brunet known as digital compositor: Framestore
  • Sule Bryan known as compositor: Cinesite
  • Rory Bryans known as matchmove artist: framestore
  • Lukasz Bukowiecki known as visual effects editor: Framestore
  • Jean-Francois Burdin known as digital paint & roto artist: Framestore CFC
  • Paul Burton known as lighting technical director
  • Gayle Busby known as visual effects producer
  • Eamonn Butler known as animation supervisor: Cinesite
  • Hélène Bécourt known as vfx co-ordinator: Cinesite
  • Craig Calvert known as cg supervisor: Mr. X Inc.
  • Alexander Cameron known as matchmove artist: Framestore
  • Zac Campbell known as digital compositor
  • Alexandre Canniccioni known as lighting technical director: Framestore
  • Owen Carroll known as digital compositor: Framestore
  • Jonathan Carré known as digital compositor
  • Thomas Carter known as matchmove artist: Framestore
  • Agustín Cavalieri known as digital compositor
  • Maxime Cazaly known as matchmove artist: Framestore
  • Maxime Chaix known as compositor
  • Andrew Kin Fun Chan known as digital artist
  • Andy Chan known as senior visual effects compositor: Mr. X Inc.
  • Anthony Chappina known as senior effects technical director: Framestore
  • Phillip Charles-Sweeting known as digital paint and roto artist
  • David Chen known as digital compositor
  • Joseph Cheng Chen known as tracking / layout artist
  • Jon Chesson known as lead compositor: Method Studios
  • Rachan Chirarattanakornkul known as tracking/layout
  • Daniel Chirwa known as compositor: Cinesite
  • Carlos Ciudad known as visual effects coordinator
  • Patrick Clancey known as digital opticals
  • Richard Clarke known as visual effects supervisor: Cinesite
  • Peter Clayton known as animator: Cinesite
  • Roberto Clochiatti known as lighting technical director: Framestore
  • Ross Colgan known as data i/o: Cinesite
  • Chris Cook known as modeller
  • Chris Cooper known as matchmove artist: Framestore
  • Nestor Costa known as track/matchmove artist
  • Laura Coumbe known as digital paint & roto artist
  • Gary Couto known as digital compositor
  • Antonio Covelo Peleteiro known as matchmove artist
  • Mathew Crisp known as digital paint & roto artist: Framestore
  • Ryan Cromie known as senior texture artist
  • Eoghan Cunneen known as pipeline technical director
  • Ryan Cunningham known as visual effects coordinator
  • Grahame Curtis known as cg modeler: Cinesite
  • Poprizov Cvetan known as matchmove artist: FX3X
  • Adam Czuprak known as production support: Cinesite
  • Matthew D'Angibau known as lead matchmove artist: Cinesite
  • Roberto D'Ippolito known as digital compositor
  • Cesar Dacol Jr. known as senior modeler: Mr. X Inc.
  • Philippe David known as tracking/matchmove artist: Framestore
  • Amy Davis known as digital compositor: Framestore
  • Amy Daye known as digital compositor: Mr. X Inc
  • Jo De Mey known as prep artist: Cinesite
  • Christophe Dehaene known as digital compositor
  • Paul DeOliveira known as visual effects compositor
  • Shiv Dholakia known as visual effects artist
  • Fabrice Di Cicco known as matchmove artist: Peanut FX
  • Oz Dolphin known as lead senior matchmover
  • Francesc Donaire known as paint and roto artist: Framestore
  • Becca Donohoe known as compositing production manager
  • Brett Dowler known as visual effects producer: Method Studios Vancouver
  • Elisabeth Dugnas known as paint and roto artist
  • Finlay Duncan known as paint & roto artist
  • Gus Duron known as optical editor
  • Carl Edlund known as digital matte painter: Framestore
  • Phil Eldridge known as visual effects editor
  • Chelsea Marie Elliott known as digital compositor
  • Jane Ellis known as vfx producer: Cinesite
  • Nathan Englbrecht known as lighting artist
  • Omid Ensafi known as digital compositor
  • Lars Erik Eriksen known as paint & roto artist: Framestore
  • Federico Favaro known as rigger
  • Oliver Fergusson-Taylor known as compositor: Framestore
  • Maxime Ferland known as paint & roto artist: Framestore
  • Bruno Fernandes known as compositor: Cinesite
  • Dadrian Flavors known as visual effects coordinator
  • Jérôme Foucout known as digital compositor: Modus Fx
  • Zack Fox known as additional visual effects coordinator
  • Richard Frazer known as digital compositor
  • Lisa Funkel known as digital artist
  • Leila Gaed known as lighting technical director: Framestore
  • Dale Gagne known as visual effects editor
  • Sabrina Gagnon known as visual effects coordinator
  • Bradley Gaines known as paint artist: Method Studios
  • Joshua Galbincea known as compositor
  • Wei Gao known as digital compositor
  • Danny Garcia known as integration artist
  • Daniel Gardiner known as paint and roto artist
  • Richard Garnish known as technical support: Cinesite
  • Caroline Garrett known as cg manager: Cinesite
  • Jesus Garrido known as digital compositor
  • Sarah Gatefield known as matchmover: Cinesite
  • Nikos Gatos known as cg lighting artist: Cinesite
  • Nikos Gatos known as senior lighting technical director: Cinesite
  • Tomi George known as paint and roto artist
  • Nikhil Ghoorbin known as data i/o: Cinesite
  • Andre Giordani known as matchmove artist: Framestore
  • Thomas Girdwood known as matchmove lead: Framestore
  • Matt Glover known as visual effects production manager
  • Jean-Baptiste Godin known as digital compositor
  • Ketki Gokhale known as character rigger: Method Studios
  • Derik Gokstorp known as pipeline technical director
  • Adam Goldstein known as lighting technical director: Framestore
  • Pam Gonzales known as paint: method studios
  • Alex Gooding known as visual effects artist
  • Sam Gordon known as modeller
  • Kelsey Gow known as paint & roto artist
  • Emily Greeley known as lead paint & roto artist
  • Florian Grenier known as paint & roto artist
  • Steven Grover known as visual effects coordinator: Method Studios Vancouver
  • Dean Grubb known as effects technical director
  • Benjamin Guy known as matchmover
  • Amélie Guyot known as matchmove artist: Peanut FX
  • Charlie Habanananda known as digital grading artist
  • Christopher Haldane known as matchmove artist: framestore
  • Daniel Hammonds known as paint & roto artist
  • Nicholas Hampshire known as pipeline technical director
  • Jayse Hansen known as interface designer
  • Matt Hansen known as visual effects artist
  • Peter Hardy known as visual effects artist
  • Annick Harmel-Tourneur known as rigging supervisor
  • Dan Harrod known as compositor: Cinesite
  • Clive Haward known as technical support: Cinesite
  • Oliver Hearsey known as senior tracking artist: Mr. X Inc.
  • Karsten Hecker known as visual effects engineer
  • Nicole Hekel known as paint artist
  • Martin Hesselink known as previs artist
  • Frederic Heymans known as digital compositor
  • Victoria Hodson known as matchmove artist
  • Ady Holt known as matchmove artist
  • Lyndsey Horton known as rigger: Method Studios LA
  • Manuel Huertas Marchena known as matte painter / look dev
  • Vivien Hulbert known as visual effects coordinator: Framestore
  • Antony Hunt known as vfx executive producer: Cinesite
  • Louise Hutchinson known as vfx producer: Cinesite
  • Todorovski Ilija known as matchmove artist
  • Paul Ingram known as matchmove artist
  • Sonia Alexia Ioannou known as matchmove artist
  • Sasha Leigh Izadpanah known as paint & roto artist
  • Owen Jackson known as digital paint and roto artist
  • Zave Jackson known as compositing supervisor: Cinesite
  • Sashka Jankovska known as production support: Cinesite
  • Collombier Jerome known as matchmove artist: Framestore
  • Jeremy Johnson known as digital compositor
  • Christopher Django Johnston known as animator: Framestore
  • Chelsea Kammeyer known as digital production manager: Method Studios
  • Alban Kasikci known as digital compositor: Framestore
  • Ravi Krishna Kasumarthy known as roto and paint artist
  • Rosie Keane known as prep station: Framestore
  • Alvin Keung known as digital compositor: Method Studios
  • Nicholas Kim known as digital compositor: Method LA
  • Andrew Kinnear known as paint & prep artist: Cinesite
  • Sean Kinnear known as visual effects artist
  • Connor Kitto known as tracking artist
  • Jeffrey Kleiser known as visual effects supervisor: Perception NYC
  • Daniel Klöhn known as visual effects
  • James Kuroda known as senior digital compositor: Method Studios
  • Lorne Kwechansky known as lead look development artist
  • Laurent Laban known as lead animator: Framestore
  • Caroline Labrie known as animator
  • Bruno-Olivier Laflamme known as digital effects artist
  • Emanuel LaFrance known as digital compositor
  • Gary Laurie known as senior matchmove/layout technical director: Method Studios
  • Mike Leben known as motion control operator
  • Marco Lee known as digital compositor: Mr. X Inc.
  • Paul Lee known as animator: Cinesite
  • Soon Ngee Chris Lee known as digital compositor
  • Benoit Lefebvre known as senior tracking artist: Mr. X Inc.
  • Thomas Lefebvre known as digital compositor: framestore
  • Benoit Legros known as compositor: Cinesite
  • Janek Lender known as animator
  • Yann Leroux known as digital compositor
  • John Peter Li known as cg supervisor
  • Devin Lim known as visual effects artist
  • Patricia Llaguno known as digital compositor
  • Jeremie Lodomez known as digital compositor: Framestore
  • Michael Lohr known as matchmove artist
  • Lara Lom known as senior visual effects coordinator: Framestore
  • Daniel Lu known as lead modeller/rigger: Soho VFX
  • Mickaël Léger known as digital compositor
  • Viviane Lévesque Bouchard known as digital compositor: Framestore
  • Francesc Macia known as roto/prep artist: cinesite
  • Stephen MacKershan known as lighting technical director
  • Allan Magled known as visual effects producer
  • Finbar Mallon known as data i/o: Cinesite
  • Ajoy Mani known as visual effects supervisor: Perception NYC
  • Chen Mao known as r & d software engineer
  • Antonio Marra known as pipeline technical director: Framestore
  • Edward Martin known as matchmover: Cinesite
  • Graham Martin known as vfx production coordinator
  • Giovanni Mascherpa known as lighting td
  • Laszlo Mates known as senior lighting technical director
  • Peregrine McCafferty known as matchmove supervisor: Peanut FX
  • Vincent McCrindle known as tracking/layout artist
  • Tom McHattie known as compositing supervisor: Method Studios Vancouver
  • Claire McLachlan known as digital compositor: Mr. X
  • Fiona McLean known as vfx line producer: Framestore
  • Jan Meade known as visual effects line producer
  • Sarah-Émilie Mercier known as vfx editor
  • Adrian Metzelaar known as lead compositor: Framestore
  • Ellie Meure known as digital compositor
  • Mark Millena known as digital paint & roto artist: Framestore
  • Meherzad Minbattiwala known as digital compositor: Soho VFX
  • Alejandro Miranda Palombo known as digital compositor
  • Carlos Monzon known as compositing supervisor
  • Thomas Grant Morrison known as lighting artist
  • Stuart Munro known as matchmove artist: Framestore
  • Adam Nagle known as production assistant: Cinesite
  • Peter Nagle known as production support: Cinesite
  • Makarand Nazirkar known as rigging td
  • Travis Nelson known as compositor: Method Studios
  • Sebastian Ness known as matchmove artist
  • Helen Newby known as compositing supervisor: Cinesite
  • Nicolette Newman known as texture artist: cinesite
  • Yuhay-Ray Ng known as model and texture artist: Mr. X
  • Eric Noel known as lighting technical director: Framestore
  • David J. Nolan known as paint and roto artist: Framestore
  • Kelly Noordermeer known as visual effects editor: Mr. X Inc
  • Tom O'Flaherty known as animator: Cinesite
  • Noel O'Malley known as matchmove artist: Framestore
  • Shannon Leigh Olds known as visual effects editor
  • Sonny Ong known as visual effects artist
  • Nicholas Onstad known as lead paint artist: Method LA
  • Michelangelo Neri Orliani known as digital compositor
  • Anna Pacchioni known as compositor
  • Guo Kun Pan known as render support: framestore
  • Alessandro Pantanella known as compositing supervisor
  • Navarro Parker known as interface artist
  • Diego Pastor Bartoli known as matchmover: Framestore
  • Radhika Patel known as matchmove artist: Framestore
  • Jane Paton known as digital compositor
  • Jane Paton known as paint & prep artist: Cinesite
  • Russell Pawson known as visual effects editor
  • Jennifer Pearson known as visual effects editor: Method Studios Vancouver
  • Cecile Peltier known as digital compositor (Framestore)
  • Venetia Penna known as compositor: Cinesite
  • Aymeric Perceval known as compositing supervisor: Cinesite
  • Chris Perschky known as technical support: Cinesite
  • Daniel Pettipher known as production support: Cinesite
  • Chi Pham known as visual effects systems administrator
  • Kevin Pierce known as compositor: Method Studios
  • Britton Plewes known as lighting lead: Mr. X
  • Lee Chan Popo known as paint and roto artist
  • Lee Chan Popo known as prep artist
  • Mike Portoghese known as digital compositor
  • Christian Poullay known as matchmove artist: Cinesite
  • Akie Prapas known as lead tracking/layout
  • Christopher Puchta known as effects td: Cinesite
  • Maik Pham Quang known as matchmove artist: framestore
  • Janhavi Ramaswamy known as senior paint and roto artist: Framestore
  • Karthic Ramesh known as digital compositor: Soho VFX
  • Patrick Redmond known as lighting technical director
  • Siân Rees known as digital matte painter
  • Siân Rees known as paint and roto
  • Mark T. Reid known as digital compositor
  • Tristan Rettich known as data i/o
  • Florent Revel known as matchmover
  • Marc Rice known as compositor
  • Thomas Rich known as lead i/o: Modus FX
  • Romain Rico known as digital compositor
  • Paulina Rodriguez Lemus known as paint and roto artist: Framestore
  • Jorge Oliva Ruiz known as digital compositor
  • Freddy Salazar known as lighting technical director
  • Pinto Sasikumar known as visual effects producer
  • Brandon Schaafsma known as vfx dailies editor: Mr. X Inc
  • Milan Schere known as senior matte painter: Mr. X Inc.
  • Michele Sciolette known as technical support: Cinesite
  • Prathap Sekar known as paint and roto artist: Framestore
  • Aatesh Shah known as systems engineer: Framestore
  • Brad Share known as animator
  • Josh Shuman known as visual effects artist
  • Chad Sigston known as assistant editor
  • Nikola Simeonov known as tracking/layout: Framestore
  • Ronald Siy known as production support: Cinesite
  • Byron Slaybaugh known as visual effects artist: Prologue
  • Maxwell Smith known as matchmove artist
  • Henry South known as visual effects artist
  • Daniel St-Amant known as digital compositor
  • Simon Stanley-Clamp known as visual effects supervisor: Cinesite
  • Darryl Stawychny known as visual effects data wrangler
  • Kasy Stein known as digital compositor
  • Mark Stepanek known as cg lighting artist: Cinesite
  • Alastair Stevenson known as matchmove artist: Framestore
  • James Sweeney known as digital artist
  • Sarah Swick known as visual effects producer: Soho VFX
  • Brendan Taylor known as digital compositor
  • Mark Taylor known as texture artist: Framestore
  • Vincent Techer known as cg lighting artist: Cinesite
  • Mark Thomas-Stubbs known as visual effects artist
  • Anthony Tocchio known as visual effects production assistant
  • Ruggero Tomasino known as digital compositor
  • Thanos Topouzis known as effects technical director: Framestore
  • Elena Topouzoglou known as digital compositor
  • Benoit Touchette known as general manager: Framestore
  • John Treusch known as visual effects artist
  • Arron Turnbull known as matchmover: Cinesite
  • Jonathan Turner known as digital compositor: Framestore
  • Devin Uzan known as digital compositor
  • Alexandra Vaillancourt known as visual effects coordinator: Framestore
  • Courtney Vanderslice known as vfx executive producer: Cinesite
  • Tracey Vaz known as digital compositor
  • Dan Victoire known as digital compositor
  • Corinne Villa known as assistant visual effects editor
  • Eduardo Villarreal known as paint and roto
  • Yurdakul Volkan known as paint & roto artist: Framestore
  • Sören Volz known as digital compositor: Framestore
  • Holger Voss known as cg supervisor
  • Jonathan Vuillemin known as cg lighting artist: Cinesite
  • Johan Walfridson known as production support: Cinesite
  • Andy Walker known as cg supervisor
  • Jessica Wan known as digital compositor
  • Pete Warbis known as matchmove artist
  • Alex Webb known as compositor: Cinesite
  • Ollie Weigall known as compositor: Cinesite
  • Jeremy Weinstein known as assistant visual effects editor
  • Aaron Weintraub known as visual effects supervisor: Mr. X Inc
  • Holger Wenzel known as look development technical director
  • Holger Wenzel known as texture artist
  • Kevin Wheatley known as technical support: Cinesite
  • Barnes Wheeler known as assistant visual effects editor: Framestore
  • Matt 'Readyman' Whelan known as previs
  • Bernard Wicksteed known as senior matchmove artist: Framestore
  • Ruth Wiegand known as rigging artist: FrameStore
  • Yanick Wilisky known as visual effects executive supervisor: Modus FX
  • William Marshall Wilkinson known as visual effects editor: Cinesite
  • Royston Willcocks known as cg modeler: Cinesite
  • Sally Wilson known as texture artist: Framestore
  • Andrew Winters known as visual effects artist
  • Bruce Woloshyn known as visual effects supervisor: Method Studios Vancouver
  • Sunny Wong known as digital compositor
  • Richard Worsley known as matchmove artist
  • Dean Wright known as visual effects producer
  • Trevor Wyatt known as rotoscope and matchmove coordinator: Method Studios
  • Shibo Xiao known as lighting technical director: Framestore
  • Michelle Yhan known as digital compositor
  • Prince Yiadom known as digital paint and roto artist
  • Hasan Sedat Yildiz known as digital compositor
  • Dioni Zhong known as pipeline technical director
  • Celine Zoleta known as production assistant
  • Jack Grundy known as rotoscope artist: Mr. X Inc (uncredited)
  • Danielle Nadal known as production support: Framestore (uncredited)
  • Paul Roberts known as render support (uncredited)

MPAA: Rated PG-13 for intense sequences of action including frenetic gun violence throughout, brief strong language, sensuality and some drug material

..

 
 

Filmography links and data courtesy of The Internet Movie Database


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Posted on February 17, 2014 by Harry in Movies | Tags: , .

10 Comments

  1. v-bach-of from Germany
    17 Feb 2014, 6:00 am

    I really don't understand all the hate this movie gets. Yeah, I get it,it's a reboot of a perfectly good 80s movie that nobody really wanted,but it's a really good one! I expected a mindless Micheal Bayian actionmovie and what I got was a really smart, interesting and entertaininglook at trans-humanism, the freedom of choice, politics andrecklessness in corporate leaders.

    This movie really dives into the question of how a person could livehis day to day live with almost all of his body amputated and stuckinside of a machine. So when people complain about the uncomfortablescenes between Murphy and his wife, I can only imagine they mean whathappened after his transformation, and that felt exactly the way it wassupposed to!

    So yes, the original is way more graphic and still holds up to this dayas a gruesome action flick, but this one is smart and interesting andreally is a good movie in it's own right.

    And by no means is it as bad as people say it is!

  2. Rich Coggs from United Kingdom
    17 Feb 2014, 6:00 am

    Okay, so very few people were confident about this remake. The originalhas such a huge fan base that a reboot seems like blasphemy to most.

    So how does this hold up? Well, it looks like butter, it at timestastes like butter, but brother, it ain't butter. Believe it.

    The film lacks something and I think I know what it is; there is noreal villain. Instead of building up a super-villain for Murphy tofight to the death with, it toys with different characters as his foe,never really committing to one or the other. Kurtwood Smith is an evilson of a gun in the original because he shoots Murphy to pieces. Its upclose and personal. In this, well, the guy that car bombs (lame) ourrobotic cop gets about 2 minutes of screen time with very little backstory. Frankly, you just don't care.

    The plot seems more concerned about Murphy trying to cope with becomingan amputee and him and his family learning to accept his newcircumstances, which frankly, when you see what he looks like withoutthe armour, is just disturbing. Instead of being an awesome actionflick, you just feel bad for the guy. The reality of the situation isjust too harsh in its portrayal and you end up thinking maybe he wouldbe better off dead.

    Do you want to pay good money to question your ideological valuestowards quality of life or do you want to see robocop go toe to toewith a man who shot him to s***? I know what I'd buy for a dollar.

    Also, on a side note: Samuel L. Jackson needs to stop being in films.While his appearance at first is welcome, by the end it feels verycheap and unnatural. The anti-American war effort message starts to geta little forced down your throat and before you start screaming thatI'm a flag loving American, I'm a Brit, and even I felt the satire wasa bit in your face.

    The film shouldn't upset people too badly, it could honestly be muchworse and it does have some passable moments with a couple of good nodsto the original. Just don't get your hopes too high.

  3. PassPopcorn from Osijek, Croatia
    17 Feb 2014, 6:00 am

    I'm a fan of the original 'RoboCop' movie – I find it to be fun,satirical, enjoyably violent and overall very good. Naturally, I wasn'tvery thrilled when I heard it was getting a remake. I was even lessthrilled when I heard the remake will be rated PG-13. I mean – how canyou make a 'RoboCop' movie without excessive violence and blood squibs?Now that I have seen the movie, I can freely say that the PG-13 ratingis the least of this movie's problems. Initially, I didn't want tocompare the remake to the original, I wanted to view it and review itas a stand-alone movie. Now that I have seen it, I think I'll have tocompare the two movies after all, since the remake possesses none ofthe qualities that made the original such a classic, and by simplecomparison I can easily explain why the remake is an utterly flawed andridiculous movie.

    The movie opens with a political show, called the Novak Element, led bythe host Pat Novak (Samuel L. Jackson), during which we see a newsfootage of OmniCorp droids (including the famous ED-209 and the freshlyintroduced humanoid drones called ED-208) patrolling and inspecting thestreets of some Islamic state. Novak compliments the droids and thenstarts attacking The Dreyfuss Act – a law that forbids the deploymentof such drones in the USA. We are then introduced to Raymond Sellars(Michael Keaton), the CEO of OmniCorp, who is trying to find ways oftricking The Dreyfuss Act and start deploying his products in the USA.He gets the idea of incorporating both man and machine into an ultimatelaw enforcement product. We are then introduced to our protagonist –Alex Murphy (Joel Kinnaman) – who is soon heavily injured in anexplosion and is used as a guinea pig in this newest OmniCorp program.

    Like I said before: the 'RoboCop' remake lacks everything that was goodin the original movie. First of all, there's no worthy satire in themovie. Society is sometimes mocked through the character of Pat Novak,but the satire isn't very subtle nor intelligent – actually, I'd say itis very primitive and expeditionary. Second of all, the nature ofRobocop's character is very different from the original movie; he's nota robot, but more a man in a robotic suit, and his family plays afairly big role in the movie. And I would be perfectly fine with thesechanges if the main actor, Joel Kinnaman, didn't have the charisma of apaper bag and could, as a matter of fact, act (!), and if Abbie Cornish(who plays the role of Alex Murphy's wife – Clara Murphy) wasn't soirritatingly bland. The revelation of the RoboCop suit and the suititself were also poorly done. In one scene, Michael Keaton's charactercriticizes the suit design that appeared in the original movie bysaying something along these lines: the original suit wasn't tacticalenough. Well, at least the original suit didn't look like a blackdildo!

    The villains in the movie didn't get a much better treatment, either.Among the several villains that appeared in the movie, none wasmemorable or even remotely interesting. But, to be fair, not everythingsucks about the 'RoboCop' remake. Some of the acting was OK (mostly byexperienced actors like Jackson, Keaton and Oldman) and the specialeffects did look really good. But what's the use of awesome specialeffects when the majority of the movie's boring and tedious? Add to allthe aforementioned flaws the PG-13 rating, which destroyed thepotential of some scenes, and you'll get one weak and forgettablemovie. In the original, one of the most memorable lines goes 'I'd buythat for a dollar'. In addition to butchering everything else, theremake also butchered this line. In one scene, Jackie Earle Haley'scharacter Mattox bashes the concept of Robocop saying he 'wouldn't buythat for a dollar'. As for myself, if I knew upon purchasing my ticketwhat horrors were awaiting, I wouldn't have bought it for a dollar.

    Rating: 4/10 Read more reviews at http://passpopcorn.com/

  4. The-Seeker from United Kingdom
    17 Feb 2014, 6:00 am

    **SPOILERS** I'll start this review by making it clear that theoriginal Robocop is my personal favourite movie and has been since Ifirst saw it 25 years ago. Having felt much trepidation about thedirection the remake was going in (PG-13 rating in particular) I wentin with fairly low expectations but still something of an open mind asI really wanted this reboot to faithfully kick-start a new, successfulRobocop franchise.

    I was pleasantly surprised by the first hour of the film and howMurphy's quite horrifying physical transformation was depicted (therewasn't much left of him) and the emotional impact upon him. Iparticularly liked the first few scenes of him coming to grips with hisnew form and his little meltdown in the Chinese factory in which he wasbuilt. Unfortunately the film starts to take a significant nose dive atthe point of Robocop's big public unveiling. A stupidly convenient plotdevice whereby the entire Detroit PD database including 17 years worthof the city's CCTV is uploaded to Murphy merely minutes before he'sabout to make his big appearance. This causes Robocop to overloadrequiring a change to Murphy be necessitated resulting in him thenbecoming more robotic and ultimately making an arrest for murder uponhis big unveiling. This was a clumsily handled plot device done for theadvancement of the plot but defied logic. Why give him a massive uploadat such a crucial time? Others have pointed to a lack of a trueantagonist and this is very true. Main criminal Antoine Vallon isutterly woeful compared to Kurtwood Smith's vile Clarence Boddiker andeven Micheal Keaton can't hold a candle to Ronny Cox's performance inthe original. There is also little chemistry between Alex and ClaraMurphy both before and after his transformation.

    The film is best when it isn't trying to ape and nod towards theoriginal. The use of Basil Poledouris' majestic music in PedroBromfman's new score is particularly jarring and poorly orchestrated.When I watched Man of Steel at about the 50 minute mark I realised Ihadn't heard John Williams classic Superman theme but also realisedthat this was a new take on the Superman mythos that didn't need toborrow from it's predecessors. Shame this film didn't follow suit.

    The effects are generally good but alas the Robocop/ED-209 battle isjust a typical modern day CGI fest and has none of the weight of thesame scene from the original.

    The film's biggest issue is undoubtedly caused by the constrictions ofthe PG-13 rating. Hearing arch criminals talk without any swearingpulls me out if the film and destroys any sense of realism. In onescene as Murphy approaches a drug factory to make a bust images of theclassic drug factory shoutout of the original came to mind. Alas thisversion turns out to be a total anti-climax almost totally devoid ofthe carnage so required from such a scene. This follows on to Robocoptaking down Vallon in a night vision shootout where men are shot but noblood, death or injury are shown in even any mildly satisfying manner.This shows clearly that gritty subject matter is not befitting of ateenage rating and similar target audience. Would something like TheWire work if it was aimed at a teenage audience? No.

    There aren't any particular standout performances other than GaryOldman who almost always delivers no matter the role or movie. Kinnamanis somewhat wooden in places but gives a decent enough performance eventhough at times he looks uncomfortable with the role. One aspect of thefilm that did nothing for me was Samuel L Jackson's character who opensand closes the film and offers his very one sided views throughout. Ifthis is their replacement of the satire of the original they can keepit. It's ham fisted and provides little more than uninterestingcommentary on the power of the media and plot exposition. It tells usnothing interesting that we don't already know and Jackson does hisshouty thing to excess, especially at the cringe-worthy end.

    I wholly embrace the need to make this reboot from a fresh angle tothat of Verhoven's original but Sony MGM have played it way too safewith something that would clearly play better if it were aimed at anadult audience. I genuinely believe that an R rated movie, devoid ofsuch tight restrictions would have been a far more satisfyingexperience. The original Robocop franchise died when they aimed at ayounger demographic. Hollywood greed I fear has caused a repeat of thismistake. It's not a bad film per se, it's just painfully average andtherefore unable to get out from the vast shadow of its forebear andlike the Total Recall remake, it tries too hard too often to remind youof the original whilst offering nothing new to compete with it. I doubtthere's even a harder cut tucked away for home release and even ifthere was there are plot issues that damage the film as much as thetame approach. Other gripes include a lack of clarity as to Omnicorp'srole (if any) in Murphy being blown up, and plot threads not beingfollowed through to any satisfying conclusion such as Murphy'srelationship with his family. The best bits revolve around Murphy'sinitial awakening as a cyborg which are very well done indeed.

    Alas there's not really that much else that's in any way as memorableas the 1987 classic it's based on. As an example of how modernHollywood has become all about excessive studio control abovecreativity and maximising ticket sales at the expense of a film'soverall artistic quality then this film succeeds. In all other aspectsit's a bit of a wasted opportunity really.

  5. caseymoviemania from Malaysia
    17 Feb 2014, 6:00 am

    In 2010, acclaimed director Darren Aronofsky (THE WRESTLER, BLACK SWAN)was originally attached to direct the ROBOCOP reboot. Frankly, Ithought he was the right choice to reboot the once-popular franchiseback in the late '80s. Unfortunately, he quits the project andBrazilian director Jose Padilha (ELITE SQUAD, ELITE SQUAD: THE ENEMYWITHIN) was brought in as his replacement.

    WHAT IS IT ALL ABOUT?

    When police detective Alex Murphy (Joel Kinnaman) is critically injuredduring a car explosion in front of his home, CEO of OmniCorp RaymondSellars (Michael Keaton) sees him as a golden opportunity to make himfeel alive again by turning him into "Robocop" — a cyborg policeofficer which is touted as the future of law enforcement in America.However, OmniCorp doesn't realize that Murphy still has a personalvengeance in his mind to pursue the criminals who nearly caused himdead.

    THE GOOD STUFF

    Like the first two ELITE SQUAD movies, director Jose Padilha deliversthe same raw intensity that gives ROBOCOP a quasi-documentary feel tothe action sequences. Even though Padilha utilizes shaky camera-work,at least he doesn't make the scene so wobbly until the viewers unableto see what's really going on. The special effects are spectacular,while the costume design for the all-new Robocop in a black tacticalbody actually looks quite nifty.

    Swedish-American actor Joel Kinnaman (best known in the US for TV's TheKilling) delivers an emotionally engaging performance as Alex Murphyand Robocop, while Michael Keaton steals most of the spotlight as theslimy CEO of OmniCorp Raymond Sellars and Gary Oldman gives a perfectlyrestrained performance as the sympathetic Dr. Dennett Norton. Otherminor roles — including Abbie Cornish as Murphy's wife, Clara; JackieEarle Haley as the military tactician Mattox; and Samuel L. Jackson asthe media host Pat Novak — are all equally impressive.

    MOST MEMORABLE MOMENT(S)

    The brief but intense battle between Robocop and a small army of ED-209during the climactic finale.

    THE BAD STUFF

    The biggest weakness in this ROBOCOP reboot is Joshua Zetumer'scaptivating but bloated screenplay. First of all, the story drags toomuch with Murphy's personal family matter with his estranged wife Clara(Abbie Cornish) and son David (John Paul Ruttan). Then there's theunderwritten plot involving Murphy's personal vengeance against AntoineVallon (Patrick Garrow), who is responsible for the car explosion. Eventhe so-called social commentary involving the "robo-phobic" issuequoted by Samuel L. Jackson's Pat Novak doesn't really say much thatworth a debate.

    FINAL WORDS

    While the new ROBOCOP is far from a genre classic by any means, atleast Jose Padilha's version isn't as bad as most people might haveexpected. Just put your mindset of the Paul Verhoeven's original 1987version aside, and treat this as an entirely new movie altogether.

    caseymoviemania.blogspot.com

  6. Martin Graupner from Germany
    17 Feb 2014, 6:00 am

    I love Paul Verhoeven's RoboCop from 1987 (which remains iconic) and Iusually don't like reboots. But watching the new one I never got rid ofthe feeling, that the remake is worth it. It is a whole newinterpretation, that sets the focus on the topics of our time: robots,drones, the human aspect behind the technology, media critics, warpropaganda. I felt, the movie has a mission to enlighten people and Iliked that. It became even more obvious how much the RoboCop storyexists within the topos of Frankenstein which is the story about thehuman devilment and the lack of respect of life. That's why Padilhagives Murphy more of a face, a life and feelings.

    Beside that the pictures, the sound, the music is pretty contemporary.You probably have to make some compromises today to get the millions toget the flick done. It won't become iconic, but it's the right time forthe right message in the right movie.

  7. ikhypk-406-644521 from Malaysia
    17 Feb 2014, 6:00 am

    The new RoboCop is a surprisingly good and entertaining sci-fi actionthriller that appeals to the human heart by conveying emotions and thehumanity side of Murphy, the main character who eventually becomes thetitled cyborg law enforcer. The film ultimately wins for not trying tobe the original (1987 version). The story of Murphy is similar (sinceit's a remake) but does its own thing to provide something new insteadof retelling the same thing again. The film focuses more on thedevelopment of Murphy's character, his initial response to his cyborgbody and relationship with his family, making the character moreemotional and relatable to the audience.

    The film delves into the meaning of humanity, family themes, mediainfluence on public opinion, corporate greed (capitalism),authoritarianism and corrupt law enforcement authorities. It provides abrief view of the struggles we might face with machines or digitalsurveillance of the future. It also briefly raises the question whetherit's ethical or legal to eliminate the human factor in law enforcementto reduce crime rates by creating merciless cyborgs or robots toreplace humans.

    The action sequences are updated with a higher body count, with betterCGI and sound effects, making them cooler, stylish and moreentertaining than the original. The new black tactical design ofRobocop is found to be acceptable and nice…the updated Robocop ismore agile, flexible and stronger compared to the original. However, Ipersonally find the right human hand to be slightly distracting. (Iprefer no human hand at all, entirely machine except the face)

    There's quite a lot of credible actors in this film: Abbie Cornish, JayBaruchel, James Earle Haley, Gary Oldman, Michael Keaton and Samuel L.Jackson all providing decent performances to this remake. Although it'shardly a ground-breaking film or a masterpiece, Robocop is a decent andsatisfying remake that delivers on many levels. There's currently noplot problems, inconsistencies or plot holes found in this film at thistime of writing this review. So, it's good enough for a recommendationto watch it.

    Rating: 7.5/10

    http://yjcool.blogspot.com/2014/01/movie-review-robocop-2014.html

  8. yuta_rule from United States
    17 Feb 2014, 6:00 am

    By 7, it really means a 7.5/10. Not sure what's with the negativereviews, but I enjoyed the movie very much. It's well-executed and thedirection was clear and crisp. There's no distinct feel-good actionsscenes because the pacing is kept constant throughout and I don't seewhy there's an issue with the pacing being that way. It's hardly flat,it's just a very honest, straight- flushed story-telling, and it fitsthe themes that are underscored by the movie. Alex Murphy is areluctant hero and he's ultimately a father and a husband whosepersonal agenda serves as his existential core. I like how these themesare teased out and zoomed in upon throughout the movie. Also, there aresome absolutely delicious production details and CGIs that are justabsolutely feasts to the eye. Not to mention the superb cast and thewonderful performances. I think this is a honest and loyal reboot thatwill appeal to fans of Robocop who fell in love with the storyprecisely for the moralistic themes it explores.

  9. morocco722
    17 Feb 2014, 6:00 am

    One wonders why Hollywood thinks bland will sell. The Verhoeven versionwas far far better. You might as well have had Uwe Boll direct thismovie as soon as you decided to cripple it with a PG rating and otherterrible compromises. There were some reasonable action sequences buton the whole it just didn't flow. It wasn't edgy and therefore will beforgettable. There are a million great unused ideas out there, yetHollywood seems to be fascinated with trotting out the violated corpsesof achievements past because they are just to frightened these days tohave an original thought. Strangely, despite "playing it safe" thenumber of movies that flop seems to be on the rise.

  10. SeussMeTub
    17 Feb 2014, 6:00 am

    With Hollywood at a loss to make original movies, it was inevitablethat the Robocop franchise would eventually get the reboot. In 1987,the original Robocop became an instant box office hit with its mixtureof witty satire and over the top violence as well as top notch actingby Peter Weller, Kurtwood Smith and Ronny Cox; the deciding factor inwhat made that movie so fresh at the time was the addition of Dutchdirector Paul Verhoeven who seemed to understand what the audience atthe time needed: a high tech cyborg (artfully designed by specialeffects whiz Rob Bottin and its robotic suit would become a cinemaicon) who fought crime in a near future world overwhelmed by greed,hypocrisy, corruption and excessive, almost cartoonish violence.

    In this reboot, the studios were able to acquire the services ofBrazilian director Jose Padiha (who directed Elite Squad and itssequel, two intense police thrillers set in his native Brazil) butunfortunately they forgot to give him a good script to work with (therewere rumors during production that Padiha had a lot of ideas that werenixed by studio bosses. Figures.). The other reason why the originalmovie also worked was because its R rating worked in its favor: theenormous amount of bloodletting added to its satirical view of thefuture as well as that of American culture which really spoke to theaudience. With this reboot aimed at more family friendly crowds, thePG-rated violence is filmed using rapid jump cuts which makes ittotally confusing, its like watching a video game on fast forward sothat by the time your mind registers what's going on the scene isfinished.

    The movie itself also suffers from pacing problems- just when thenarrative is about to steamroll forward, the scenes abruptly change sothat any emotional momentum is lost because there just isn't muchcharacterization of the main parts; everything that should have anemotional impact is glossed over by a jump to a new scene with way toomuch focus on explanations of what the characters are doing so that theaudience fails to gain sympathy for anybody.

    I can't really judge Joel Kinnaman's acting in the title role sincethere really isn't much for him to do other than walk around in theRobocop suit and utter a few words every now and then- he seems tospend too much time bug eyed and in shock more than anything else. Thesupporting cast also seems wasted, with Michael Keaton and Jackie EarleHaley's screen time largely limited to trying to explain whats going onrather than actually doing anything. Even Michael K Williams seems lostas Robocop's sidekick. Patrick Garrow as the heavy is pretty much acardboard villain compared to the 1987 version with the menacingKurtwood Smith and his gang of killer psychos. Gary Oldman'sperformance is pretty much average since he's also got nothing much todo.

    Alas, the biggest disappointment is the movie's absence of any sort ofhumor: the 1987 film had boatloads of wacky commercials thatinterrupted the narrative yet provided a great view on how that futureworld was set up as well as crazy, sadistic villains and a pun on thename of the chief baddie (Dick Jones- best name ever). Instead, we getsnippets of a news media show run by Samuel L Jackson whose presence inthis movie is also wasted since he spends more time recapping what wealready saw and his jokes fall flat.

    The only good scene happens right at the beginning with a battlebetween Iranian insurgents and the robot army but soon after the moviequickly loses momentum and never regains it. Better to skip this oneand wait for the rental, or better yet, watch the 1987 version- its waybetter.

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