Iron Man 2 (2010) Poster

Iron Man 2 (2010)

  • Rate: 7.0/10 total 156,082 votes 
  • Genre: Action | Adventure | Sci-Fi
  • Release Date: 7 May 2010 (USA)
  • Runtime: 124 min
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Iron Man 2 (2010)

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  • IMDb page: Iron Man 2 (2010)
  • Rate: 7.0/10 total 156,082 votes 
  • Genre: Action | Adventure | Sci-Fi
  • Release Date: 7 May 2010 (USA)
  • Runtime: 124 min
  • Filming Location: 85 W State St, Pasadena, California, USA
  • Director: Jon Favreau
  • Stars: Robert Downey Jr., Mickey Rourke and Gwyneth Paltrow
  • Original Music By: John Debney   
  • Soundtrack: Groove Holmes
  • Sound Mix: DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS
  • Plot Keyword: Superhero | Billionaire | Military | Birthday | Action Hero

Writing Credits By:

  • Justin Theroux (screenplay)
  • Stan Lee (Marvel comic book) and
  • Don Heck (Marvel comic book) and
  • Larry Lieber (Marvel comic book) and
  • Jack Kirby (Marvel comic book)

Known Trivia

  • Al Pacino was considered for the role of Justin Hammer.
  • In the comics, Tony Stark possesses a suitcase containing a portable suit of armour. This famous “suitcase armour” has been revised for the film: the suitcase converts into a series of plates that slide over a wire framework.
  • Writer Shane Black recommended that Tony Stark’s characterization be inspired by J. Robert Oppenheimer, the scientist who led the team that developed the atomic bomb. After witnessing his creation’s destructive potential, Oppenheimer defamed himself as “the Destroyer of Worlds” and sank into depression.
  • Renowned animator Genndy Tartakovsky was hired to storyboard the film’s action sequences.
  • Emily Blunt was set to star as Black Widow but had to pull out due scheduling conflicts with her movie Gulliver’s Travels.
  • Robert Downey Jr. recommended screenwriter Justin Theroux, who did Downey’s Tropic Thunder, to Jon Favreau to write the film’s script.
  • To prepare for his role as Ivan Vanko/Whiplash, Mickey Rourke paid a visit to Butyrka Prison, Moscow: “I tried to incorporate the whole Russian philosophy. It’s a culture of its own and I really enjoyed doing the research and meeting the people and they were very gracious there at the prison.” Rourke also commented that Vanko’s dialogue is in a Slovakian accent.
  • The character of Ivan Vanko (Mickey Rourke) is a combination of Iron Man’s enemy the Crimson Dynamo (Dr Vanko, who wears weaponry/armour that can control electricity) and the supervillain Whiplash (who possesses a specially-designed razor/acid whip). In addition, the character is portrayed as the son of Anton Vanko, who was the original Crimson Dynamo in the comics, and assumes the identity of B. Turgenev (Boris Turgenev, in the comics the second Crimson Dynamo).
  • Samuel L. Jackson was promised that Nick Fury would be given more screen time by director Jon Favreau. Jackson almost didn’t return to play Fury, due to problems with contract negotiations, but secured a landmark nine-picture deal to play Nick Fury not only in this film but in many other Marvel Studio productions.
  • Jon Favreau’s first sequel as a director and as an actor.

Goofs: Continuity: The position of the tape dispenser and the box with letter opener on Pepper's desk when Tony collects the Expo model.

Plot: Because of his superhero alter ego, Tony Stark must contend with deadly issues involving the government, his own friends and new enemies. Full summary »  »

Story: With the world now aware of his dual life as the armored superhero Iron Man, billionaire inventor Tony Stark faces pressure from the government, the press, and the public to share his technology with the military. Unwilling to let go of his invention, Stark, along with Pepper Potts, and James "Rhodey" Rhodes at his side, must forge new alliances – and confront powerful enemies.Written by Anonymous  

Synopsis

Synopsis: Six months after the end of the first movie, Tony Stark (Robert Downey, Jr.) has used his Iron Man armor to bring about a negotiated peace treaty between the major super powers of the world, and his immense popularity with the general public is only furthered when he fulfills his father’s dream by opening the "Stark Expo", to showcase all the latest inventions that will benefit the world. Stark is, however, still vilified by the United States government, and Senator Stern (Gary Shandling) in particular, who demands that he hand his armor technology over for military application. Stark refuses, publicly shaming rival Justin Hammer (Sam Rockwell) in the process by highlighting his own failed attempts at recreating the technology. All is not well in Stark’s life, however: he has discovered that the palladium in the arc reactor keeping shrapnel from penetrating his heart has begun to poison his body, slowly killing him, and all attempts to find a substitute element have failed. Slowly going off the rails as a consequence of what he believes to be his impending death, he appoints his former personal assistant Pepper Potts (Gwyneth Paltrow) CEO of Stark Industries, replacing her with Natalie Rushman (Scarlett Johansson).

While racing in Monaco, Stark is attacked by Ivan Vanko (Mickey Rourke), who has constructed a miniaturized arc reactor of his own. It is contained in a chest harness with two attached whips, powered by the reactor’s energy. Vanko uses the whips to create a massive car crash in the race and goes after Stark. Stark is able to defeat Vanko with the aid of his Mark V armor (a transforming briefcase). Stark later discovers that Vanko is the son of disgraced Russian physicist Anton Vanko, who collaborated on the first arc reactor with Stark’s father Howard (John Slattery). Vanko is promptly broken out of jail by a revenge-seeking Justin Hammer, who puts him to work developing armored suits like Stark’s that he plans to unveil at the Stark Industries Exposition. Vanko, upon seeing the suits for the first time, forcibly removes the suit’s helmet, saying he can improve the design.

Tony throws what he believes will be his last birthday party and gets drunk whilst wearing the Iron Man armor. His subsequent reckless behavior prompts his friend, Lt. Colonel James Rhodes (Don Cheadle) to don the Mark II armor and subdue him. Rhodey flies off in the Mark II armor, delivering it to military authorities at Edwards Air Force Base. Justin Hammer is later invited to study the suit himself and provides them with advanced weapons to arm it with.

Disgraced, Stark is approached by Nick Fury of S.H.I.E.L.D (Samuel L. Jackson) who tells Stark that his father’s work went unfinished due to the technological limits of his time. They are joined by Natalie Rushman whom Fury reveals is, Natasha Romanoff, an undercover operative of SHIELD, planted to monitor Tony himself. She injects Tony with a serum that slows the symptoms of his palladium poisoning significantly, giving him the time to find an alternate element to keep him alive. Fury provides Tony with a chest of his father’s old artifacts that can hopefully be used to find a cure for his palladium poisoning. Reviewing the film reels in the chest, Stark discovers a message from his father that leads him to the original 1974 diorama of the Stark Expo: in reality, it is a disguised diagram for the atomic structure of a new element. Stark hand-builds a particle accelerator with the aid of his computer J.A.R.V.I.S. (voiced by Paul Bettany) and synthesizes this new element, creating a new triangular chest arc reactor that cures his poisoning.

At Hammer Industries, Vanko has radically changed the design of Hammer’s suits: they are now automated drones. Despite what Vanko considers improvements, Hammer is displeased and imprisons Vanko in a small room with two guards while he takes the drones to the Stark Expo.

Hammer unveils his new military drones, captained by Rhodes in a heavily-weaponized version of the confiscated Mark II armor. Unfortunately, it is soon discovered that Vanko has programmed the drones, giving himself complete control. He also has control of Rhodes’ new armor, and Stark arrives just as they go on the attack. As Stark battles these remote-controlled enemies, Happy Hogan (Jon Favreau) and Romanoff race to Hammer’s Queens facility to stop Vanko. By the time they arrive, Vanko has already departed for the Expo in a new armored suit, an updated version of the harness he used when attacking Tony in Monaco. Natasha is able to give Rhodes control of his armor again so that he and Stark can fight Vanko together. The two armored allies combine their powers and successfully take Vanko down, but his armor and drones are revealed to have been equipped with self-destruct charges. As they begin to explode, Stark races to save Pepper, rescuing her at the last minute. After landing on a roof she quits her CEO position, and she finally gives Tony a kiss, to which they both find Rhodes sitting a few meters away. He then claims he was there first so they should get their "own roof" after Stark tries to defend himself.

At a debriefing, Fury informs Stark that while Stark is "unsuitable" for the "Avengers Initiative", S.H.I.E.L.D. wants Stark as a consultant. Stark agrees on the condition that Senator Stern personally present him and Col. Rhodes with their medals for bravery.

In a post-credits scene, S.H.I.E.L.D. agent Coulson (Clark Gregg) is seen driving to a remote impact crater in the New Mexico desert. As he informs Fury over the phone that they’ve "found it", the crater is shown to contain Mjolnir, the hammer of Thor.

 

FullCast & Crew

Produced By:

  • Victoria Alonso known as co-producer
  • Louis D'Esposito known as executive producer
  • Susan Downey known as executive producer
  • Jon Favreau known as executive producer
  • Kevin Feige known as producer
  • Alan Fine known as executive producer
  • Karen Gilchrist known as associate producer (as Karen Johnson)
  • Eric Heffron known as associate producer (as Eric N. Heffron)
  • Jeremy Latcham known as co-producer
  • Stan Lee known as executive producer
  • David Maisel known as executive producer
  • Denis L. Stewart known as executive producer

FullCast & Crew:

  • Robert Downey Jr. known as Tony Stark / Iron Man
  • Gwyneth Paltrow known as Pepper Potts
  • Don Cheadle known as Lt. Col. James 'Rhodey' Rhodes / War Machine
  • Scarlett Johansson known as Natalie Rushman / Natasha Romanoff / Black Widow
  • Sam Rockwell known as Justin Hammer
  • Mickey Rourke known as Ivan Vanko / Whiplash
  • Samuel L. Jackson known as Colonel Nick Fury
  • Clark Gregg known as Agent Coulson
  • John Slattery known as Howard Stark
  • Garry Shandling known as Senator Stern
  • Paul Bettany known as Jarvis (voice)
  • Kate Mara known as U.S. Marshal
  • Leslie Bibb known as Christine Everhart
  • Jon Favreau known as Happy Hogan
  • Christiane Amanpour known as Herself
  • Philippe Bergeron known as Detective Lemieux
  • James Bethea known as Security Force #1
  • Michael Bruno known as Security Force #2
  • Kate Clark known as Expo Fan
  • Luminita Docan known as Russian Newscaster
  • François Duhamel known as French Photographer
  • Larry Ellison known as Himself
  • Adam Goldstein known as Himself (as Adam 'DJ AM' Goldstein)
  • Tim Guinee known as Major Allen
  • Eric L. Haney known as General Meade
  • Ali Khan known as 10 Rings Gangster
  • Yevgeni Lazarev known as Anton Vanko (as Eugene Lazarev)
  • Stan Lee known as Himself
  • Isaiah Guyman Martin IV known as AV Operator
  • Helena Mattsson known as Rebecca
  • Keith Middlebrook known as Expo Cop
  • Anya Monzikova known as Rebeka
  • Margy Moore known as Bambi Arbogast
  • Olivia Munn known as Chess Roberts
  • Elon Musk known as Himself
  • Alejandro Patino known as Strawberry Vendor
  • Davin Ransom known as Young Tony Stark
  • Karim Saleh known as Guard
  • Brian Schaeffer known as Hammer Expo Tech
  • Phillipe Simon known as French Waiter
  • Jack White known as Jack
  • Victoria Gracie known as Ironette Dancer (as Victoria Parsons)
  • Gina Cantrell known as Ironette Dancer
  • Jill Ann Pineda-Arnold known as Ironette Dancer
  • Sandy Colton known as Ironette Dancer (as Sandra Colton)
  • Annika Ihnat known as Ironette Dancer
  • Jenny Robinson known as Ironette Dancer
  • Lindsay Dennis known as Ironette Dancer
  • Jennifer D. Johnson known as Ironette Dancer
  • Lindsay Rosenberg known as Ironette Dancer
  • Hannah Douglass known as Ironette Dancer
  • Nadine Ellis known as Ironette Dancer
  • Kylette Zamora known as Ironette Dancer
  • Mark Kubr known as Prisoner
  • Mathew Lorenceau known as Prison Guard Chevalier
  • Ted Alderman known as News Cameraman (uncredited)
  • Donessa Alexander known as Birthday Party Guest / Expo Guest (uncredited)
  • Martin Andris known as Expo Greeter (uncredited)
  • Gregory Baldi known as Monaco Grand Prix Restaurant Guest (uncredited)
  • Elya Beer known as Bartender (uncredited)
  • Ayelet Ben-Shahar known as Model (uncredited)
  • Jordan Bobbitt known as Little Girl at EXPO Gala (uncredited)
  • Chris Borden known as Dignitary / Expo Attendee (uncredited)
  • Pete Brown known as Air Force Major (uncredited)
  • Basilina Butler known as Tony Stark Racing Fan (uncredited)
  • John Ceallach known as Captain Anders (uncredited)
  • Katie Cleary known as Beautiful Girl (uncredited)
  • Ajarae Coleman known as Expo Guest (uncredited)
  • Rick L. Dean known as Monte Carlo Race Fan (uncredited)
  • Timothy 'TJ' James Driscoll known as French Prison Guard #2 (uncredited)
  • Jasmine Dustin known as Watermelon Girl (uncredited)
  • Mark Casimir Dyniewicz known as Justin Hammer Expo Attendee (uncredited)
  • Sam Felman known as Stark Expo Attendee (uncredited)
  • Caitlin Gallo known as I Love You girl (uncredited)
  • Shakira Vanise Gamble known as Pepper's Party Guest (uncredited)
  • Paul Grace known as French Prison Guard #1 (uncredited)
  • James Granville known as Expo Fan (uncredited)
  • Jennifer Lynne Johnson known as Expo Attendee (uncredited)
  • Cameron Lee known as Senate Page (uncredited)
  • Jee-Yun Lee known as Reporter (archive footage) (uncredited)
  • Waymond Lee known as Expo Guest (uncredited)
  • Christopher Maleki known as Reporter (uncredited)
  • Bryan McCoy known as Expo Guest (uncredited)
  • Ed Moy known as Awards Attendee (uncredited)
  • Delka Nenkova known as Russian Woman (uncredited)
  • Tony Nevada known as SWAT Sergeant Bellows (uncredited)
  • Bill O'Reilly known as Himself (uncredited)
  • Allison Ochmanek known as Watermelon Girl (uncredited)
  • Nicolas Pajon known as French Reporter (uncredited)
  • H.E. Victor J.W. Pekarcik III known as White House Chief of Staff (uncredited)
  • Erin Pickett known as Expo Guest (uncredited)
  • Olivia Presley known as Expo VIP (uncredited)
  • Steven James Price known as Senate Gallery Member (uncredited)
  • Kiana Prudhont known as Expo Kid (uncredited)
  • Kristin Quick known as VIP Expo Guest (uncredited)
  • Tanner Alexander Redman known as 1960's Film Crew (uncredited)
  • Kelly Sarah known as Stark Expo Attendee (uncredited)
  • Torin Sixx known as Pepper's Birthday Party Guest (uncredited)
  • Peter Trenholm Smith known as Senator (uncredited)
  • Grace Stanley known as Model (uncredited)
  • Doug Swander known as Party Guest (uncredited)
  • Michael A. Templeton known as US Senator (uncredited)
  • Rosa Tyabji known as Background (uncredited)
  • Peter Sebastian Wrobel known as Tony Stark Usher (uncredited)
  • Maria Zambrana known as Expo Attendee (uncredited)

..

 

Supporting Department

Makeup Department:
  • David Abbott known as makeup artist
  • Merribelle Anderson known as assistant department head hair
  • Allan A. Apone known as makeup artist
  • Kim Ayers known as makeup artist
  • Robin Beauchesne known as makeup artist
  • Kate Biscoe known as makeup artist: Ms. Paltrow
  • John Blake known as makeup department head
  • Thom Cammer known as hair stylist
  • Clare M. Corsick known as hair stylist
  • Ken Culver known as mold maker
  • Deborah La Mia Denaver known as key makeup artist
  • Jamie Leigh DeVilla known as makeup artist
  • Amy L. Disarro known as makeup artist
  • Cheryl Eckert known as hair stylist
  • Linda D. Flowers known as hair department head
  • Kay Georgiou known as hair stylist: Gwyenth Paltrow
  • Silvina Knight known as makeup artist
  • Mike Mekash known as personal makeup artist: Mickey Rourke
  • Kelly Muldoon known as hair stylist
  • Kelly Muldoon known as key hair stylist: second unit
  • Tijen Osman known as department head hair stylist: second unit
  • Viola Rock known as makeup artist
  • Florence Roumieu known as key makeup artist
  • Keith Sayer known as makeup artist
  • Nicole Sortillon known as makeup artist
  • Justin Stafford known as wig maker
  • Arjen Tuiten known as special makeup effects artist: Legacy Effects
  • Terrie Velasquez known as key hair stylist
  • Victoria Wood known as wig maker: Mickey Rourke, Scarlett Johansson: additional photography
  • Rocky Faulkner known as makeup artist (uncredited)

Art Department:

  • Ruben Abarca known as drapery foreman
  • Lauren Abiouness known as art department researcher
  • Doreen Austria known as graphic designer
  • Ernie Avila known as set designer
  • Berj Daniel Bedrosian known as propmaker
  • Harald Belker known as vehicle designer
  • Mark Bialuski known as gang boss propmaker
  • Andrew Birdzell known as set designer
  • Russell Bobbitt known as property master
  • Tony Bohorquez known as lead model maker
  • Bret Brand known as propmaker foreman
  • Steve Buckner known as prop maker
  • Crisoforo Caballero known as plasterer
  • Lars Canty known as storyboard artist
  • Anthony Carlino known as leadman
  • Randy L. Childs known as propmaker gangboss
  • Peter C. Clarke known as assistant property master: second unit
  • Ralph Cobos known as plaster gang boss
  • Fred 'The Finisher' Coleman known as plaster gang boss
  • Michelle Collier known as art department assistant
  • Tony Cope known as plaster gang boss
  • Sharon Davis known as set designer
  • Val I. Deikov known as sculptor
  • Michael DeLuca known as plasterer
  • Daren Dochterman known as conceptual illustrator
  • David E. Duncan known as storyboard artist
  • John Eaves known as prop designer
  • Monica Fedrick known as graphic designer
  • Mariano Fernandez known as propmaker
  • Mark Finer known as on-set dresser: inserts/second unit
  • Sven Fodale known as propmaker foreman
  • Philippe Gaulier known as concept artist (Double Negative vfx )
  • Richie Gordon known as property intern
  • Adi Granov known as conceptual illustrator
  • J. Bryan Holloway known as sculptor
  • Jacob J. House known as plaster gang boss
  • Bill 'Kauhane' Hoyt known as stand-by painter
  • Eric Hugunin known as assistant art director
  • George Hull known as conceptual artist
  • Lee J. Jashinsky known as painter
  • Eric Kagan known as assistant props
  • Nancy A. King known as art department coordinator
  • Noelle King known as set designer
  • Helen Kozora known as set decoration buyer
  • David Lowery known as storyboard artist
  • Thomas Machan known as art department assistant
  • John Mann known as storyboard artist
  • Bryan McBrien known as greens foreman
  • Stephen McCumby known as property assistant
  • Ryan Meinerding known as conceptual illustrator
  • Ron Mendell known as concept artist
  • John Micheletos known as set dresser: non local
  • Christopher Morente known as greensman
  • Josh Morris known as painter
  • Adam Mull known as additional model maker
  • Edward Nua known as propmaker gangboss
  • James V. Oliveri known as propmaker foreman
  • William Allen Olsen known as props
  • Scott Patton known as concept designer
  • Eric Ramsey known as storyboard artist
  • Donald Redoglia known as propmaker foreman
  • Wendy Riva known as assistant art director
  • Eugene P. Rizzardi known as prop shop foreman
  • Carl Robarge known as plaster gang boss
  • Aaron G. Rodriguez known as stand-by painter: reshoots
  • Danny Rowe known as set dresser
  • Keith Samson known as plasterer
  • Sal Sanchez known as plasterer
  • Jerry Sargent known as propmaker foreman
  • Randy Severino known as set dresser
  • Daron Smith known as propmaker
  • Jason Soles known as plasterer gang boss
  • Hans Soto known as greensperson
  • Jim Stubblefield known as assistant property master
  • Dan Sweetman known as storyboard artist
  • Genndy Tartakovsky known as storyboard artist
  • Edward L. Turk known as propmaker gangboss (as Edward Leroy Turk)
  • Brian Walker known as co-construction coordinator
  • Robert Weiland known as propmaker gangboss
  • Nathaniel West known as concept artist
  • David D. Wheeler known as carpenter
  • Breanna Wing known as art department intern
  • Ryan Jeremy Woodward known as animatic artist
  • Jack Worden known as plasterer
  • James Yates known as propmaker foreman
  • Shaun Young known as set decorating coordinator
  • Jonathan Bach known as concept illustrator (uncredited)
  • Brian S. Childs known as propmaker (uncredited)
  • Vincent D'Aquino known as greens foreman (uncredited)
  • Michael Denering known as lead scenic artist (uncredited)
  • Kent Kidman known as propmaker (uncredited)
  • Matthew King known as assistant food stylist (uncredited)
  • Steve Lauritzen known as set dresser (uncredited)
  • Sunil Pant known as 3D design artist (uncredited)
  • Jack White known as food stylist (uncredited)

..

 

Company

Production Companies:

  • Paramount Pictures (presents)
  • Marvel Entertainment (presents)
  • Marvel Studios
  • Fairview Entertainment (in association with)

Other Companies:

  • Hollywood Rentals Productions Services  grip and lighting equipment
  • Abbey Road Studios  music recorded at
  • Air Lyndhurst Studios  orchestra and choir recorded at (as Air Studios, London)
  • Central Casting  extras casting
  • Chapman/Leonard Studio Equipment  camera dollies
  • Columbia Records  soundtrack
  • Dean Street Productions No. 1 GP  production services
  • Direct Tools & Fasteners  expendables
  • Doggicam Systems  BodyMount provided by
  • DoggieCam Systems  BodyMount provided by
  • EFilm  digital intermediate
  • Film Source  purchased unused film stock
  • Fisher Technical Services Rentals  camera & performer flying system
  • Flying Pictures  aerial filming by
  • Future Capital Partners  special thanks
  • Gallagher Entertainment  insurance (uncredited)
  • Gamma & Density  on-set color correction
  • Go For Locations  locations cleaning services
  • Go For Locations  locations equipment rentals
  • Go For Locations  locations website hosting
  • LA Management  talent management (uncredited)
  • OTC Productions  digital asset management
  • Pacific Studios Inc.  chromatrans background
  • Panavision Remote Systems  Technocranes and Libra Heads
  • Panavision Remote Systems  remote camera systems
  • Playback Technologies  video and computer playback
  • Prologue Films  main title sequence
  • Red Rhino Trailers  hair and make-up trailers
  • Red Talent and Literary Agency  talent agency and representative
  • Reel Security  production security
  • Rockbottom Rentals  cell phone rentals
  • Rockbottom Rentals  walkie rentals (uncredited)
  • Scarlet Letters  end titles
  • Screen Capital International  special thanks
  • Sigloch Military / Tactical  swat casting and technical services
  • Spacecam Systems  aerial cameras provided by
  • tacticalproshop.com  tactical equipment

Distributors:

  • Bontonfilm (2010) (Czech Republic) (theatrical)
  • Concorde Filmverleih (2010) (Germany) (theatrical)
  • Finnkino (2010) (Finland) (theatrical)
  • Forum Cinemas (2010) (Estonia) (theatrical)
  • Forum Cinemas (2010) (Lithuania) (theatrical)
  • Forum Cinemas (2010) (Latvia) (theatrical)
  • Paramount Japan (2010) (Japan) (theatrical) (as Paramount Pictures Japan)
  • Paramount Pictures Entertainment (2010) (Canada) (theatrical)
  • Paramount Pictures (2010) (Australia) (theatrical)
  • Paramount Pictures (2010) (France) (theatrical)
  • Paramount Pictures (2010) (UK) (theatrical)
  • Paramount Pictures (2010) (USA) (theatrical)
  • Solar Entertainment (2010) (Philippines) (theatrical)
  • Tatrafilm (2010) (Slovakia) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2010) (Argentina) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2010) (Denmark) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2010) (Greece) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2010) (Norway) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2010) (Poland) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2010) (Sweden) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2010) (Singapore) (theatrical)
  • United International Pictures (UIP) (2010) (Turkey) (theatrical)
  • Universal Pictures International (UPI) (2010) (Netherlands) (theatrical)
  • Zon Lusomundo Audiovisuais (2010) (Portugal) (theatrical)
  • FX Network (2012) (USA) (TV)
  • Film1 (2011) (Netherlands) (TV) (limited)
  • Odeon (2010) (Greece) (DVD) (blu-ray)
  • Paramount Home Entertainment (2010) (Netherlands) (DVD)
  • Paramount Home Entertainment (2010) (Netherlands) (DVD) (Blu-ray)
  • Paramount Home Entertainment (2010) (Sweden) (DVD)
  • Paramount Home Entertainment (2010) (Sweden) (DVD) (Blu-ray)
  • Paramount Home Entertainment (2010) (USA) (DVD)
  • Paramount Home Entertainment (2010) (USA) (DVD) (Blu-ray)

..

 

Other Stuff

Special Effects:

  • California Neno Systems Institute (visual effects)
  • Centroid Motion Capture
  • Double Negative (visual effects and animation)
  • Embassy, The (additional visual effects) (as The Embassy Visual Effects)
  • Evil Eye Pictures (visual effects)
  • Fantavision (special effects)
  • Fuel International
  • Fuel VFX
  • Hydraulx (visual effects) (as HY*DRAU*LX)
  • Industrial Light & Magic (ILM) (visual effects and animation)
  • Kerner Optical (miniature effects and photography)
  • Legacy Effects (physical Iron Man suits and make-up effects)
  • Lola Visual Effects (visual effects) (as Lola VFX)
  • Makeup Effects Laboratories (prosthetics: Nick Fury)
  • Perception
  • Pixel Liberation Front (visual effects)
  • Pixomondo (additional visual effects)
  • Prologue Films (visual effects)
  • ROTO Visual Studio (visual effects: rotoscoping)
  • Svengali Visual Effects
  • Third Floor, The (previsualization and postvisualization)
  • Tinsley Studio (prosthetic makeup effect tattoos: Mickey Rourke)
  • Trixter Film (additional visual effects) (as Trixter Effects)

Visual Effects by:

  • Scott M. Adams known as visual effects production assistant: ILM
  • Diccon Alexander known as matte painting supervisor: Double Negative
  • Papavramides Alexandra known as digital compositor: Double Negative
  • Casey Allen known as senior Flame artist
  • Steven Anderson known as vfx production assistant: ILM
  • Florent Andorra known as senior technical director: ILM
  • Chris Antonini known as visual effects plate coordinator
  • Sean Araki known as systems administrator: Pixomondo
  • Spencer Armajo known as Flame artist
  • Tom Armbruster known as motion capture
  • Stewart Ash known as animator
  • Stewart Ash known as visual effects: Double Negative
  • Nicole Ashford known as visual effects artist
  • Hunter Athey known as previsualization artist: The Third Floor
  • Kate Auld known as digital compositor
  • Brett Bailey known as design/animation: Perception
  • Keziah Bailey known as visual effects artist
  • Kamilla Bak known as digital compositor
  • Santhoshi Balasubramanian known as digital artist: ILM
  • Adam Barnett known as technical support
  • Austin Basile known as digital compositor
  • Simeon Bassett known as CG sequence supervisor
  • Jason Bath known as visual effects producer: Fuel VFX
  • Joel Bautista known as digital compositor: ILM
  • Scott E. Baxter known as digital effects artist
  • Daniel Bayona known as digital artist: ILM
  • Basel Bazlamit known as post-visualization artist
  • Andy Bean known as visual effects artist
  • Jeff Beattie known as visual effects editor
  • Ashley Beck known as motion capture artist
  • Jo Ann Cordero Belen known as compositor: Double Negative
  • Kevin Bell known as digital compositor: ILM
  • James Bennett known as animator: ILM
  • Laurent Bentolila known as visual effects
  • Ashley Bettini known as visual effects production assistant: ILM
  • Muhittin Bilginer known as visual effects technical director: Double Negative
  • Wayne Billheimer known as visual effects producer: ILM
  • Sean Bittinger known as technical support: ILM
  • Sarah Blank known as designer (as Sarah Birns)
  • Stephen A. Bloch known as previsualization artist: The Third Floor Inc
  • Richard Bluff known as digital artist: ILM
  • Marten Blumen known as compositor
  • Stella Bogh known as digital compositor
  • Michael Bomagat known as animator
  • Tess Boughton known as visual effects artist
  • Tatjana Bozinovski known as compositor
  • Charlie Bradbury known as visual effects producer: The Embassy VFX
  • Steve Braggs known as CG sequence supervisor: ILM
  • Timothy Brakensiek known as creature supervisor
  • Andreas Braun known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Stefan Braun known as matchmover: Trixter Film
  • David M. Breaux Jr. known as character animator: Pixomondo
  • Jamie Briens known as effects technical director: Double Negative
  • A.J. Briones known as previsualization artist
  • Richard Briscoe known as senior digital compositor
  • Mikael Brosset known as visual effects: Double Negative
  • Tripp Brown known as visual effects artist
  • Dan Browne known as systems admistrator: Evil Eye Pictures
  • Nik Brownlee known as digital compositor: Double Negative
  • Daniel Bryant known as digital compositor: ILM
  • Chad Buehler known as digital compositor
  • Matthew Bullock known as digital modeler: Double Negative
  • Charles Bunnag known as second digital colorist
  • Patrick Michael Burke known as compositor
  • Patrick Michael Burke known as visual effects: Double Negative
  • Jeremy Burns known as digital compositor
  • Richard Burnside known as matchmove artist: Double Negative
  • Thomas J. Burton known as visual effects: Double Negative
  • Marshall Candland known as digital artist
  • Lauren Carara known as visual effects production coordinator: ILM
  • Steve Casa known as 3D scan technician
  • David Casey known as visual effects: The Embassy
  • Mark Casey known as digital compositor
  • Stephen Casey known as animator
  • Stephen Casey known as lighting technical director
  • Michael Cashmore known as visual effects
  • Shoghi Castel De Oro known as previsualization artist
  • Cynthia Rodriguez del Castillo known as digital artist
  • Daniel Cavey known as vfx plate coordinator: ILM
  • Irfan Celik known as digital artist: Pixomondo
  • Qian Hao Chai known as technical assistant
  • Charmaine Chan known as assistant technical director: ILM
  • Eric K. Chan known as compositor: Double Negative
  • Henry Kwok Ho Chan known as digital artist: ILM
  • Kien Geay Chan known as digital artist
  • Can Chang known as compositor: ILM
  • Jae Chang known as visual effects executive producer
  • Paul Chapman known as digital compositor: The Embassy
  • Adam Chazen known as visual effects coordinator: Pixomondo
  • Cheah Chin Chee known as digital matte artist
  • Christopher Chen known as visual effects producer: Pixomondo Beijing
  • Albert Cheng known as previsualization supervisor: The Third Floor
  • Leila Chesloff known as digital artist
  • Peter Chesloff known as digital sequence supervisor
  • Julian Chong known as rotoscope artist: Double Negative
  • Raymond Chou known as digital artist
  • Ian Chriss known as visual effects best boy electric: Kerner Optical
  • Marc Chu known as animation supervisor: ILM
  • Alessandro Cioffi known as visual effects supervisor: Trixter Film
  • Suzanne Cipolletti known as pre-vis artist
  • Patrick Clancey known as digital opticals
  • Kirsty Clark known as digital compositor (as Kirsty Lamb)
  • Trent Claus known as Flame artist
  • Kia Coates known as digital compositor
  • Luke Cole known as pipeline engineer: Fuel VFX
  • Sam Cole known as compositing supervisor: FUEL International
  • Debra Coleman known as digital compositor
  • Andrew M. Collins known as digital artist
  • Richard Collis known as digital artist
  • Brian Connor known as sequence supervisor: ILM
  • J. Todd Constantine known as previsualization artist: The Third Floor
  • Paul Copeland known as visual effects artist
  • Joshua Cordes known as digital supervisor: Hydraulx
  • Michael Cordova known as digital artist: ILM
  • Evelyn Cover known as previsualization artist
  • Nicholas Cross known as visual effects artist: Fuel VFX
  • Ciaran Crowley known as compositing sequence supervisor
  • Devon Cutler known as digital artist
  • Beth D'Amato known as digital paint/roto artist
  • Nick Dacey known as visual effects editor: Double Negative
  • Lorelei David known as visual effects editor: ILM
  • Scott David known as digital compositor
  • Jonathan Davies known as visual effects technical director: Double Negative
  • Paul A. Davies known as animation supervisor: Double Negative
  • Ian Dawson known as visual effects supervisor/producer: Prologue
  • Graham Day known as digital compositor: Double Negative
  • Ana Mestre de Almeida Pereira known as compositor: Double Negative (as Ana Mestre)
  • Robert Deas known as visual effects artist
  • Christopher J. Decker known as senior producer: Perception
  • Chris DeCristo known as digital compositor
  • Ayse Dedeoglu known as visual effects production manager: Kerner Optical (as Ayse Arkali)
  • Yoshi DeHerrera known as 3d scanning & modeling
  • Joel Delle-Vergin known as digital compositor
  • Bernie Demolski known as visual effects key grip: Kerner Optical
  • Marie Victoria Denoga known as digital compositor
  • Natasha Devaud known as digital artist
  • Raffael Dickreuter known as previs artist: Pixel Liberation Front
  • Eric J. Dima-ala known as matte painter: ILM
  • Damian Doennig known as matchmove artist: Pixomondo
  • Andi Dorfan known as digital compositor: Double Negative
  • Brennan Doyle known as digital artist supervisor: ILM Singapore
  • Christina Drahos known as compositor: Evil Eye Pictures
  • Seth Dubieniec known as visual effects: Double Negative
  • Patricia Rose Duignan known as visual effects executive producer: Kerner Optical
  • Kalene Dunsmoor known as digital artist: ILM
  • William J. Earl known as shots technical director
  • Bruno Ebe known as effects technical director: Double Negative
  • Matthew Eberle known as visual effects production assistant
  • Selwyn Eddy known as layout supervisor: ILM
  • Jack Edjourian known as visual effects artist
  • Chris Edwards known as previsualization producer: The Third Floor
  • Sam Edwards known as digital compositor
  • Kane Elferink known as visual effects artist: Fuel VFX
  • Tosh Elliott known as modeler, lighter and texture artist: Double Negative
  • Thomas Enright known as motion control and visual effects
  • Jenni Eynon known as sequence lead: Double Negative
  • Lawrence Fagan known as spydercam flight control
  • Conny Fauser known as digital compositor
  • Sebastian Feldman known as digital compositor
  • Jessica Fernandes known as department manager: ILM Singapore
  • David Fernández Girón known as digital artist
  • Tim Field known as VFX unit producer
  • Felix Fissel known as senior it manager: Pixomondo
  • Cary H. Flaum known as supervising producer: Perception
  • Marco Foglia known as animator: ILM
  • Chris Foreman known as digital artist: ILM
  • Tim Fortenberry known as digital artist
  • Christian Foucher known as lead technical director
  • Kathryn Fowler known as visual effects coordinator (as Kathryn Kerr)
  • Mike Foyle known as digital compositor
  • Aidan Fraser known as digital compositor
  • Chris Fregoso known as compositor
  • Leslie Fulton known as animator
  • Christian Furr known as digital artist
  • Stefan Galleithner known as matchmover: Trixter Film
  • John J. Galloway known as digital compositor
  • Vanessa Galvez known as project manager: efilm
  • Chris Gardner known as visual effects artist
  • Joana Garrido known as digital artist
  • Alex Gatsis known as animator: Embassy VFX
  • Christoph Gaudl known as senior matchmover: Trixter Film
  • Daniel Gaudreau known as digital compositor
  • Riccardo Gemelli known as digital artist
  • Sotiris Georghiou known as visual effects technical director: Double Negative
  • John Giang known as concept artist
  • Walter Gilbert known as digital compositor: Double Negative
  • Pablo Giménez known as effects technical director: Double Negative
  • Geoffroy Givry known as digital compositor
  • Geoffroy Givry known as visual effects: Double Negative
  • Julian Gnass known as digital compositor: Double Negative
  • Marissa Gomes known as production coordinator: ILM
  • Danny Gonzalez known as executive creative/partner: Perception
  • Scott Gordon known as visual effects supervisor: Pixomondo
  • David Goubitz known as matchmove artist: Double Negative
  • Justin Graham known as digital compositor
  • Elizabeth Gray known as visual effects animator: Double Negative
  • Bryant Terrell Griffin known as lead matte painter
  • Joshua Grow known as 3d coordinator: Hydraulx
  • Matti Grüner known as pipeline developer: Trixter Film
  • Miguel A. Guerrero known as senior modeler: Hydraulx
  • Amélie Guyot known as matchmover
  • Jean-Denis Haas known as animator: ILM
  • Sebastian Haas known as pipeline lead: Trixter Film
  • Giles Hancock known as digital matte supervisor
  • Scott Hankel known as post-visualization artist
  • Sam Hanover known as motion capture actor: Double Negative
  • Lisa Hansen known as visual effects coordinator: Pixomondo
  • Pete Hanson known as studio manager: Double Negative
  • Gareth Harbuz known as matchmove artist
  • Joe Harkins known as digital supervisor: Hydraulx
  • Jonathan Harris known as digital compositor: Double Negative
  • Gavin Harrison known as sequence lead: Double Negative
  • Dietrich Hasse known as cg supervisor: Trixter Film
  • Andrew Hellen known as visual effects supervisor
  • Sarah K. Hellström known as production coordinator: Double Negative
  • Rachael Hender known as visual effects artist
  • Nicole Herr known as senior character animator: Pixomondo
  • Joshua Herrig known as lead lighting/look development artist: Double Negative
  • Michael Hertstein known as production assistant: Trixter Film
  • Sean Heuston known as compositor
  • Jeremy Hey known as digital compositor
  • Emiko Hikita known as visual effects
  • Darin Hilton known as senior digital matte painter
  • Richard Hirst known as Flame artist
  • Noel Hocquet known as senior technical director: Double Negative
  • Robert Hoffmeister known as lead digital artist
  • Allen Holbrook known as animator
  • Bruce Holcomb known as digital model supervisor: ILM
  • Oliver Hollis known as motion capture actor
  • Barry Howell known as previsualization artist
  • Jason Howey known as pre-visualization artist: The Third Floor
  • Pete Howlett known as digital compositor
  • Venti Hristova known as visual effects artist
  • Xiandeng Huang known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Jamison Huber known as visual effects producer: Svengali Visual Effects
  • Graham Hudson known as digital effects artist
  • Jason Hue known as modeler: Double Negative
  • Darrell Hunt known as digital effects design
  • Darrell Hunt known as visual effects coordinator
  • Zameer Hussain known as digital artist: ILM
  • Andrew Hwang known as modeler / texture artist
  • Chris Ingersoll known as compositor
  • Jonna Isotalus known as digital artist: ILM
  • John L. Jack known as visual effects executive producer: Evil Eye Pictures
  • Jiri Jacknowitz known as digital paint & roto artist
  • Alex Jaeger known as visual effects art director: ILM
  • Oliver James known as research and development supervisor: Double Negative
  • Rod M. Janusch known as visual effects gaffer: Kerner Optical
  • Patrick Jarvis known as digital painter: ILM
  • Jaime Jasso known as digital matte painter
  • Bernardo Jauregui known as visual effects production manager
  • Adam Jhani-Stephens known as vfx runner
  • Tim Jones known as look development lead
  • Grzegorz Jonkajtys known as visual effects
  • Kerry Joseph known as visual effects assistant coordinator
  • Zack Judson known as visual effects artist
  • Martin Jurado known as matchmove artist: Pixomondo
  • Erin Kanoa known as assistant matte artist: Svengali Visual Effects
  • Simon Kay known as motion capture supervisor
  • Jerome Kerzerho known as visual effects
  • Laura Killmaster known as creature technical director: ILM
  • Chansoo Kim known as animator: ILM
  • Perry M. Kimura known as scanning and recording efilm
  • Bowe King known as designer/animator: Perception
  • Stephen King known as animator: ILM
  • Jordan Kirk known as cg supervisor: Double Negative
  • Shilpa Kirpalani known as digital artist
  • John Kitching known as digital compositor
  • Daniel Klöhn known as visual effects artist: Prologue Films
  • Dan Knight known as compositor
  • Marcin Kolendo known as digital artist
  • Edmund Kolloen known as lead lighting/ look development artist
  • John Koltai known as designer/animator: Perception
  • Robert Kosai known as creature technical director
  • Justin Kosnikowski known as digital compositor: ILM
  • Makoto Koyama known as character animator: ILM
  • Marshall Richard Krasser known as CG Sequence Supervisor: ILM
  • Simone Kraus known as animation supervisor: Trixter Film
  • Heath Kraynak known as compositor
  • Scott Krehbiel known as previsualization artist: The Third Floor
  • Daniel Kruse known as digital lighter: Hydraulx
  • Ondrej Kubicek known as plate layout artist: ILM
  • Robert Kuczera known as character animator: Trixter Film
  • James Kuroda known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Kelly Jean Kurowski known as visual effects production assistant
  • Danius Kvedaras known as lead character rigger: Double Negative
  • Marco La Torre known as character animator: Trixter Film
  • Pat Lun Lam known as digital artist: ILM
  • Terence Lam known as matchmove artist
  • Yaocheng Lam known as visual effects artist: Double Negative
  • Jean-Claude Langer known as visual effects artist
  • Julien Lasbleiz known as visual effects artist
  • Kimberly Lashbrook known as digital artist
  • Jeremy Lasky known as executive creative/partner: Perception
  • Gary Laurie known as matchmove technical director: Svengali Visual Effects
  • Gary Laurie known as matchmove technical director: The Third Floor
  • Asier Lavina known as digital artist
  • Stephen Lawes known as creative director: Pixel Liberation Front
  • Stafford Lawrence known as animator
  • Isaac Layish known as sequence lead: Double Negative
  • Chris Lee Soon Ngee known as compositor
  • Adam Lee known as digital artist: ILM
  • Adrian Lee known as visual effects artist: Double Negative (as Adrian Ed Lee)
  • Jaewook Lee known as digital artist: ILM
  • SeungHun Lee known as creature technical director
  • Skeel Lee known as pipeline technical director: Double Negative
  • Sun Lee known as matte painter: Hydraulx
  • Mohen Leo known as global production management
  • John LePore known as lead design/animation: Perception
  • Keith Leung known as digital compositor: ILM
  • Sebastian Leutner known as visual effects producer: Pixomondo
  • John M. Levin known as layout artist: ILM
  • Dave Levine known as flame artist: Lola VFX
  • Gretchen Libby known as visual effects executive producer
  • Todd Liddiard known as senior digital compositing artist
  • William Lin Jiahui known as roto artist
  • Roger Liu known as previsualisation
  • Flip Livingston known as assistant visual effects yellow color artist
  • Laura Livingstone known as visual effects production assistant
  • Gresham Lochner known as digital compositor
  • Owen Longstaff known as digital compositor: Fuel VFX
  • Kim Lim Loo known as modeler: Double Negative
  • Leah Low known as matchmove artist: Double Negative
  • Leah Low known as modeler (props : Double Negative)
  • Doug Luberts known as production & technical support: ILM
  • Jeremy Luena known as visual effects production assistant
  • Demis Lyall-Wilson known as digital compositor: Fuel VFX
  • Melaina Mace known as digital matte painter: Whiskytree
  • James Madigan known as associate visual effects supervisor
  • Raj Mahendran known as technical support
  • Philippe Majdalani known as digital intermediate assistant producer
  • Roy Malhi known as CG supervisor
  • Virgil Manning known as animator
  • Paul Maples known as motion control operator
  • Artur Margiv known as matchmove artist
  • Adam Marisett known as animator: Embassy VFX
  • Nicholas Markel known as previsualization supervisor: The Third Floor
  • Jan Maroske known as digital compositor: Double Negative
  • David Marsh known as sequence supervisor: ILM
  • Matthew Marsland known as visual effects production assistant
  • Sven Martin known as visual effects supervisor: Pixomondo
  • Ruheene Masand known as visual effects coordinator
  • Sean Mattini known as digital colorist assist
  • Aaron McBride known as visual effects art director
  • Peregrine McCafferty known as visual effects: Double Negative
  • Will McCoy known as digital compositor: ILM
  • Jason McDonald known as animator
  • Matt McDonald known as visual effects supervisor: Evil Eye Pictures
  • Colin McEvoy known as senior animator
  • Ray McMaster known as visual effects
  • Scott Mease known as digital artist
  • Naveen Medaram known as digital compositor
  • Naveen Medaram known as visual effects: Double Negative
  • Gurel Mehmet known as concept artist: Double Negative
  • Chad Meire known as digital compositor
  • Tory Mercer known as sequence supervisor
  • Joseph Metten known as digital artist: ILM
  • Lori C. Miller known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Alexandre Millet known as lighting technical director
  • Alexandre Millet known as visual effects: Double Negative
  • Kristen Millette known as compositor
  • Milos Milosevic known as digital compositor: Double Negative
  • Sangita Mistry known as digital artist: Double Negative
  • Derrick Mitchell known as visual effects editor
  • Curt I. Miyashiro known as senior staff: ILM
  • James Mohan known as digital artist: ILM
  • Robert Molholm known as research and development
  • Ray Moody known as second assistant camera: visual effects unit
  • Christopher Moore known as flame artist: Prologue
  • Douglas L. Moore known as digital artist
  • Steven Moore known as modeler: Double Negative
  • Fernanda Moreno known as CG artist: Double Negative
  • Hiroshi Mori known as post-visualization artist: The Third Floor
  • Lauren Morimoto known as roto/paint lead
  • David Manos Morris known as digital effects artist
  • Amanda Morrison known as senior compositor
  • Jake Morrison known as visual effects supervisor: GOAT
  • Bryn Morrow known as research and development artist
  • Michelle Motta known as digital rotoscope and paint artist
  • Jiun Yiing Mow known as lighting technical director: ILM
  • Martin Mueller known as digital compositor: Double Negative
  • Timothy Mueller known as matte painter: ILM
  • Thierry Muller known as digital compositor: Fuel VFX
  • Norah Mulroney known as digital compositor
  • Christopher Nagel known as pipeline developer: Trixter Film
  • Ashley Nagy known as modeler: Fuel VFX
  • Abishek Nair known as digital compositor
  • Bernd Nalbach known as digital artist: Pixomondo
  • Robert Nederhorst known as visual effects supervisor: Svengali FX
  • Halim Negadi known as creature technical director: ILM
  • Eric Neill known as visual effects artist
  • Cameron Neilson known as lead compositor: Evil Eye Pictures
  • Mark Nelson known as post-visualization artist
  • Liam Neville known as digital compositor
  • Marla Newall known as plate layout supervisor: ILM
  • Sheau Horng Ng known as digital compositor: ILM
  • Yoon See Ng known as digital compositor: ILM
  • Will Nicholson known as digital effects artist: Pixomondo
  • Zanardi Nicola known as rigger
  • Bryce Nielsen known as visual effects coordinator
  • Lukas Niemczyk known as visual effects artist
  • Motoki Nishii known as modeler / texture artist
  • Thomas Nittmann known as visual effects producer: Lola Visual Effects
  • Thijs Noij known as visual effects artist
  • James P. Noon known as tracking
  • Kevin Norris known as roto artist: Double Negative
  • Jean Claude Nouchy known as visual effects technical director
  • Brian Nugent known as digital compositor: Flame artist
  • Ben O'Brien known as digital compositor
  • Erin D. O'Connor known as production manager: ILM
  • Greg O'Connor known as modeling and texturing
  • Rick O'Connor known as associate animation supervisor: ILM
  • Liam O'Donnell known as Feebles sequence created by
  • Jim O'Hagan known as digital compositor: Double Negative
  • Rodney O'Sullivan known as system support
  • Pawel Olas known as research & development lead
  • Robert Olsson known as matte painter
  • Steven Ong known as digital artist
  • Akira Orikasa known as digital artist: ILM
  • Jose A. Ortiz Jr. known as cg supervisor: Prologue
  • Cosku Ozdemir known as digital artist: ILM
  • Brian Pace known as pre-visualization artist: The Third Floor
  • Kevin Page known as digital artist: ILM
  • Erik Pampel known as editorial and technical support: ILM
  • John F.K. Parenteau known as executive producer: Pixomondo
  • Joey Park known as visual effects
  • Clark Parkhurst known as Flame artist
  • Daniel Pastore known as matchmove artist
  • Ami Patel known as digital compositor
  • Mitch Paulson known as digital colorist: EFilm
  • Enrik Pavdeja known as roto artist: Double Negative
  • Dylan Penhale known as IT manager: Fuel VFX
  • Stephen Pepper known as visual effects supervisor: The Embassy
  • Marlon Perez known as digital artist: The Third Floor
  • Katrissa 'Kat' Peterson known as visual effects coordinator
  • Jan Pfenninger known as digital compositor
  • Phil Pham known as digital artist: ILM
  • Susan Pickett known as visual effects producer
  • James Pina known as digital artist: Perception
  • Jason Pomerantz known as senior digital artist (IMAX Version)
  • Dennis Pontanares known as roto artist: Double Negative
  • Jason Porter known as sequence supervisor
  • Travis Porter known as digital compositor
  • Tanissa Potrovitza known as digital producer
  • Ed Pulis known as digital artist
  • John Purdie known as digital compositor
  • Jacqui Purkess known as digital compositor: Double Negative
  • Edward Quintero known as digital matte artist: ILM
  • Nigel Rafter known as visual effects: Double Negative
  • Gerardo Ramirez known as previsualization artist
  • Richard Ramos known as digital Artist: ILM
  • Richard R. Reed known as digital compositor
  • Richard R. Reed known as visual effects: Double Negative
  • Nolan Reese known as assistant visual effects editor
  • Garth Reilly known as compositor
  • Brett Reyenger known as digital compositor
  • Anthony Reyna known as visual effects editor: Evil Eye Pictures
  • Spencer Reynolds known as data capture engineer: ILM
  • Megan Rible known as technical support
  • Kurtis Richmond known as matte painter: Fuel VFX
  • Viktor Rietveld known as effects technical director
  • Simone Riginelli known as compositor
  • Gizmo Rivera known as compositor
  • Katherine Roberts known as CG supervisor: Double Negative
  • Matthew M. Robinson known as senior technical director
  • Darren Rodriguez known as animator
  • Patrick J. Rodriguez known as 3D artist
  • Patrick J. Rodriguez known as previsualization artist
  • In-Ah Roediger known as animation
  • Karl Rogovin known as dynamic effects animator: Hydraulx
  • Petr Rohr known as matchmover: Trixter Film
  • Tom Rolfe known as digital compositor
  • Austin Ronald known as visual effects artist
  • Daniel P. Rosen known as visual effects supervisor: Evil Eye Pictures
  • Marc Roth known as lighting technical director
  • James Rothwell known as animatics
  • Matthew Rouleau known as lead technical director
  • Craig Rowe known as digital compositor
  • Timothy Russell known as matchmove artist: Double Negative
  • Amy Ryan Gunson known as CG production manager (as Amy Gunson)
  • Olivier Ryard known as digital compositor
  • Miguel A. Salek known as visual effects
  • Jeff Saltzman known as digital artist
  • Joe Sambora known as visual effects production assistant
  • Mike Sanders known as digital supervisor
  • Nathan Santell known as previsualization producer: The Third Floor
  • Daniel Sappa known as character animator: Trixter Film
  • Steve Sauers known as digital effects artist
  • Erick Schiele known as digital lighter: Pixomondo
  • Sam Schwier known as matchmove lead
  • Shaun Scott known as texture & lighting artist: Double Negative
  • Steven J. Scott known as supervising digital colorist
  • Andrew E. Scrase known as matchmove artist: Double Negative
  • Alvaro Segura known as visual effects artist
  • Todd Semmes known as Spydercam coordinator/rigging
  • Betty Shaw known as digital resource supervisor
  • Kirk Shimano known as digital artist: ILM
  • Prateep Siamwalla known as tracking
  • Micah Sibert known as digital artist
  • Dominic Sidoli known as visual effects: Double Negative
  • Andrew Simmonds known as digital compositor
  • Jason Simmons known as effects technical director: Double Negative
  • Janek Sirrs known as visual effects supervisor
  • Ken Sjogren known as digital compositor
  • Richard Skelton known as CG artist
  • Beth Sleven known as character animator: Pixomondo
  • Patrick Smith known as pre-vis artist
  • Phil Smith known as digital artist: Double Negative (as Philip Smith)
  • Tammy Smith known as digital artist and digital compositor: Double Negative
  • Daniel Smollan known as visual effects: Double Negative
  • Dan Snape known as digital compositor: Double Negative
  • Ben Snow known as visual effects supervisor: ILM
  • Henrik Soder known as digital artist
  • Jim Soukup known as layout artist
  • Matt St. Leger known as digital artist: Perception
  • Chris Stenner known as lead character animator: Trixter Film
  • Scott Steyns known as graphics and animation
  • Jelena Stojanovic known as senior compositor
  • Colin Strause known as Feebles Sequence Created by
  • Greg Strause known as Feebles Sequence Created by
  • David Philip Stripinis known as visual effects
  • Florian Strobl known as digital compositor
  • Jimmy Stuart known as visual effects dolly grip: Kerner Optical
  • Jonas Stuckenbrock known as digital compositor: Pixomondo
  • Frederick George Stuhrberg known as 3D scanning
  • Max Stummer known as compositing supervisor: fuelvfx
  • Thomas Stölzle known as matchmover: Trixter Film
  • Mohinder Subramaniam known as digital compositor: ILM
  • Andre Surya known as digital artist
  • Jeremiah Sweeney known as Flame artist: Lola VFX
  • Heiko Sülberg known as visual effects artist
  • Lionel Taillens known as digital artist
  • Takashi Takeoka known as digital compositor
  • Alex John Tan known as matchmove artist: Double Negative
  • Henri Tan known as creature technical director: ILM
  • Ben Taylor known as digital compositor
  • Jessica Teach known as senior staff: ILM
  • Huai Yuan Teh known as digital artist: ILM
  • Adrian Teng known as digital compositor
  • Kieran Tether known as digital artist: ILM
  • Adrian Thompson known as visual effects artist
  • Johan Thorngren known as digital artist: ILM
  • Stephen Thornhill known as digital artist
  • Joe Thornley known as sequence lead
  • Paul G. Thuriot known as creature technical director: ILM
  • Travis Tohill known as animator
  • Alan Travis known as digital artist
  • Adam Trowse known as digital compositor
  • Oleg Troy known as visual effects artist
  • Adrian Tsao known as digital artist: ILM
  • Graeme Tung known as lighting technical director: ILM
  • Niki Turpin known as compositor: Double Negative
  • Simon Twine known as digital artist: ILM
  • Renée Tymn known as flame artist: Prologue
  • Joerg Unterberg known as digital artist
  • Reuben Bulawin Uy known as assistant technical director
  • Nowell Valeri known as matchmove supervisor: Evil Eye Pictures
  • Brad van Bodegom known as digital artist (IMAX version)
  • Todd Vaziri known as sequence supervisor: ILM
  • Noah Vice known as look dev/lighting technical director: ILM
  • Peter Vickery known as digital compositor: Double Negative
  • James William Visconti III known as computer/video playback engineer
  • Andres Vitale known as senior compositor: ILM
  • Rich Volp known as spydercam flight control
  • Eugénie von Tunzelmann known as visual effects: Double Negative
  • Jani Vournas known as visual effects best boy grip: Kerner Optical
  • Adam Waddington known as lighting technical director: Fuel VFX
  • Victor Wade known as compositing supervisor
  • David Wahlberg known as senior compositor: Fuel VFX
  • Tim Walker known as digital compositor: Fuel Vfx
  • Kevin Wallace known as manager of operations: Kerner Optical
  • Sharon Warmington known as digital compositor: Double Negative
  • Adrian Watkins known as digital artist
  • Talmage Watson known as digital artist: ILM
  • Brian Weaver known as previsualization artist: The Third Floor
  • Lukas Weyandt known as digital compositor
  • Bob Wiatr known as compositor main title: Prologue Films
  • Georg Wieland known as visual effects producer: Trixter Film
  • Clare Williams known as animator
  • Edson Williams known as visual effects supervisor: Lola Visual Effects
  • Kevin J. Williams known as post-viz artist
  • Eric Wimmer known as research and development: ILM
  • Jeff Winkle known as visual effects production assistant
  • Christine Wong known as sequence lead: Double Negative
  • Eddy Wong known as digital compositor
  • Ryan John Woodward known as matchmove artist: Double Negative
  • Jeff Wozniak known as digital artist: ILM
  • Kristopher Wright known as visual effects producer: Double Negative
  • Joe Tsung-Yu Wu known as cg modeler: Fuel VFX
  • Matthew Wynne known as compositor
  • Kazuyoshi Yamagiwa known as Flame artist: Lola VFX
  • Eddie Yang known as digital sculptor
  • Yi Yang known as visual effects coordinator
  • Chris Qi Yao known as matte painter
  • Teh-wei Yeh known as digital artist: ILM
  • Lim Young known as digital compositor: Double Negative
  • Dean Yurke known as Inferno supervisor
  • Attila Zalanyi known as visual effects artist
  • David Zbriger known as technical manager of global production: ILM
  • Yan Zhou known as matchmove artist
  • Paolo Joel Ziemba known as previsualization artist
  • Ryan Zuttermeister known as associate visual effects producer: Lola Visual Effects
  • Michael Allen known as 2d artist: Double Negative (uncredited)
  • Elika Burns known as roto/paint supervisor: CIS Hollywood (uncredited)
  • Saptarshi Chakraborty known as digital artist: Double Negative (uncredited)
  • Jennifer Duncan known as visual effects production assistant (uncredited)
  • Dan Feinstein known as digital artist: ILM (uncredited)
  • Paul Giacoppo known as digital artist (uncredited)
  • Angela Giannoni known as digital compositor (uncredited)
  • Bridget Maria Goodman known as digital effects artist (uncredited)
  • Ian A. Harris known as digital compositor (uncredited)
  • Michael Honrada known as roto/paint artist (uncredited)
  • Paul Huston known as digital artist (uncredited)
  • Alexander K. Lee known as animator: ILM (uncredited)
  • Darryl Li known as visual effects coordinator: Double Negative (uncredited)
  • Sky Lim known as 2D Artist: Double Negative (uncredited)
  • Taz Lodder known as technical support: Double Negative (uncredited)
  • Patrick Louie known as rotoscope artist: Evil Eye Pictures (uncredited)
  • David Lowry known as animator (uncredited)
  • Ronald Mallet known as research and development: ILM (uncredited)
  • Patrik Marek known as digital artist: ILM (uncredited)
  • Abner Marín known as modeller: Double Negative (uncredited)
  • Adam Paschke known as compositing supervisor: Double Negative Singapore (uncredited)
  • Chiraporn Pinsuwan known as roto artist: Double Negative (uncredited)
  • Daniel Keith Raffel known as digital compositor (uncredited)
  • Wajid Raza known as technical assistant: ILM (uncredited)
  • Raymond Tan known as rotoscope artist (uncredited)
  • Xique Tymn known as systems administrator (uncredited)
  • Rakitha Vithanage known as matchmove artist: Fuel VFX (uncredited)
  • Long Yinghan known as digital artist (uncredited)

Release Date:

  • USA 26 April 2010 (Los Angeles, California) (premiere)
  • Bahrain 28 April 2010
  • Belgium 28 April 2010
  • Chile 28 April 2010
  • Egypt 28 April 2010
  • France 28 April 2010
  • Kazakhstan 28 April 2010
  • Norway 28 April 2010
  • Serbia 28 April 2010
  • Sweden 28 April 2010
  • Switzerland 28 April 2010 (French speaking region)
  • Argentina 29 April 2010
  • Australia 29 April 2010
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina 29 April 2010
  • Croatia 29 April 2010
  • Czech Republic 29 April 2010
  • Denmark 29 April 2010
  • Georgia 29 April 2010
  • Greece 29 April 2010
  • Hungary 29 April 2010
  • Israel 29 April 2010
  • Kuwait 29 April 2010
  • Lebanon 29 April 2010
  • Netherlands 29 April 2010
  • New Zealand 29 April 2010
  • Panama 29 April 2010
  • Peru 29 April 2010
  • Portugal 29 April 2010
  • Russia 29 April 2010
  • Slovakia 29 April 2010
  • Slovenia 29 April 2010
  • South Korea 29 April 2010
  • Taiwan 29 April 2010
  • Ukraine 29 April 2010
  • Brazil 30 April 2010
  • Bulgaria 30 April 2010
  • Colombia 30 April 2010
  • Estonia 30 April 2010
  • Hong Kong 30 April 2010
  • Iceland 30 April 2010
  • Indonesia 30 April 2010
  • Ireland 30 April 2010
  • Italy 30 April 2010
  • Latvia 30 April 2010
  • Lithuania 30 April 2010
  • Malaysia 30 April 2010
  • Mexico 30 April 2010
  • Philippines 30 April 2010
  • Poland 30 April 2010
  • Romania 30 April 2010
  • Singapore 30 April 2010
  • Spain 30 April 2010
  • UK 30 April 2010
  • Uruguay 30 April 2010
  • Venezuela 30 April 2010
  • Syria 3 May 2010
  • Barbados 5 May 2010
  • Finland 5 May 2010
  • Austria 6 May 2010
  • Germany 6 May 2010
  • Switzerland 6 May 2010 (German speaking region)
  • Canada 7 May 2010
  • India 7 May 2010
  • Turkey 7 May 2010
  • USA 7 May 2010
  • Vietnam 7 May 2010
  • Japan 26 May 2010 (Tokyo) (premiere)
  • Japan 11 June 2010

MPAA: Rated PG-13 for sequences of intense sci-fi action and violence, and some language

..

 
 

Filmography links and data courtesy of The Internet Movie Database


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Posted on March 29, 2012 by Harry in Movies | Tags: , , , .

10 Comments

  1. EddyOne from Frankfurt, Germany
    29 Mar 2012, 11:27 pm

    Saw the movie in a press screening here are my humble thoughts:

    Before I start with my short review of Iron Man 2, I have to say twowords about Iron Man 1. I really dug the first one despite of being alittle disappointed by the grand finale. Robert Downey Jr. kills it,action, humor, pacing… loved it. I'm not a big comic geek, and notthat familiar with the original Iron Man comics, so please excuse ifsome of the stuff I thought was weird, was actually accurate adapted.

    So while the opening credits where rolling and I saw all the big namesof actors that I happen to love, I really thought that it might be hardto give all of them a fair amount of stuff to do in the movie. And asit happened to turn out, I was right. I was especially disappointed byMickey Rourke's part as Whiplash. Don't get me wrong, Rourke was great.He looks mean as usual and I loved every scene he's in. UnfortunatelyFavreau really pulled a Darth Maul on him. After the last fight Ihonestly sat in my chair and was like "that's it? you can't beserious?!". Rourke's Character had almost the same potential (at leastfrom his talent as an actor and his looks in the movie) as HeathLedger's Joker in Dark Knight. But he never lived up to thatexpectation due to the lack of screen time and, well… a purpose.

    But the main problem I had with Iron Man 2 was the lack of a meaningfulstory and motivation for almost all of the characters. We areintroduced to Scarlett Johansson's "Black Widow", and blame it on mylack of knowledge of the graphic novels, but I had no Idea what herpurpose in the movie was. The first part of the movie she's just thehot secretary with almost no lines. Eventually she puts on a tightsuper hero costume and tries to find Whiplash. There is a briefaction-sequence, where she kicks some ass, but truth be told, Hit-Girlwould wipe the floor with Black Widow. What I really liked though, wasSam Rockwell as Justin Hammer. He totally killed it and you can tell heenjoyed his part as the sleazy scumbag pulling the strings in thebackground.

    I also liked Don Cheadle as James Rhodes (he was on par with TerrenceHoward on this one), but I felt his character suffered from the lack oftime for character development. There is this scene, where Tony Starkis seriously messed up, partying at his home in his Iron Man suit andrandomly shooting stuff. Rhodes is tired of the situation and grabshimself another one of the Iron Man suits, battles Stark and thanleaves. With the suit. I don't know if that's the way it was done inthe comics, but I didn't like it at all. In the first movie we witnesshow Stark becomes Iron Man, how he needs to learn to use the suit andbecome one with it, how he builds it and we can understand, that he isthe only one, who could use it that way. Apparently we're wrong,because all you need, is the suit. It's like anyone could be Batman, ifhe just could get a hold of his cape. There is no explanation as to whyRhodes can fly this suit like he owns it, there isn't anything toldabout the relationship between Stark and Rhodes. I just felt this partwas incredible weak.

    The whole movie felt like a setup for another movie. Characters areintroduced, stuff happens, but nothing really matters, at best ithints, that there COULD be happening something in the future.

    Another big problem I had though, was the lack of 'magic moments' andthrilling action, like in the first flick (I still get goosebumps,thinking about how Tony Stark flew in his suit for the first time).Everything just runs too smooth, there is almost no tension, you neverthink anything could harm Tony Stark, you never feel something bad isabout to happen. If I compare this with the incredible Dark Knight, itfeels like a kids movie, something like the ranks of Sky High. Plus,there was just to little Iron Man in Iron Man, to little I care about.Iron Man 2 was made to prepare us for The Avengers and Thor, but bybeing that, it kinda forgot to be something in it's own. That's thebiggest difference to the first flick, who was original, fresh andsmart.

    Sounds pretty much like a bash, but all that being said, I was fairlyentertained. The performances of the main characters each were prettygood. The cast was perfect. Of course all the special effects areamazing, with a lot attention to detail. I loved all the 'augmentedreality" stuff going on in Starks garage. The movie is funny (actuallyit felt more like a comedy than an action flick) and when the actionhappens, it's looking great. The biggest let down is the potential thismovie and most and for all the characters had, which wasn't used.However this is only the review of someone who's fairly unfamiliar withthe graphic novel.

  2. R Ariel Æðelbeorht from Argentina
    29 Mar 2012, 11:27 pm

    There's RDJ and his immeasurable charisma, there's Rockwell and Rourkerocking their lines, there's classy Paltrow and shallow ScarJo (baitfor the horny nerds), there's good action.. and yet, something'smissing. Don't get me wrong: this movie is FUN, from beginning to end.Too much talking? No way. Not enough action? Maybe, but there's plenty(2 fights, 1 'friend ruckus'). But the thread that ties it all togetherdon't seem to be that strong (I blame it on Theroux). Anyway, go seeit, you won't regret. One more thing: don't believe people telling thatthis movie talks way too much about the Avengers: a few bits here andthere is not too much. And stay for the after-credits scene.

  3. bass7-730-880956 from Germany
    29 Mar 2012, 11:27 pm

    First, let me get this right; I am a FAN of the first Ironman movie;

    the American war propaganda machine looses its hero (the best weaponproducer) when the Ironman character realizes after being confrontedwith suffering and death that peace is guaranteed by "having a biggerstick" than your opponent (good so far,.., but nevertheless fun with abit of criticism);

    "welcome tony stark, the most famous mass-murderer in humanhistory"(Ironman 1)- great;

    and so Ironman is created by tony stark, a charismatic, smart genius(very good performance from Robert Downey Jr.);

    and here in Ironman2: NOTHING, NO STORY, NO PLOT, EVEN NO ACTION; NOCHARACTER DEVELOPMENT; just nothing; the tony stark character isn'teven smart anymore; he is just arrogant and sometimes accidentallyfunny;

    when you watched the trailer you have seen ALL the action sequences(and i really mean ALL!) in the whole film; the whole film is filledwith senseless dialogues; why replacing Terrence Howard with DonCheadle??? Terrence did a good job, Don Cheadle doesn't fit in(although he was great in Traitor) Mrs. Paltrow is just annoying,annoying, annoying; Samuel L. Jackson just makes a 2 min commercial forthe avenger movie; Sam Rockwell, well.., not so good:)

    the only positive thing are the action scenes with Mickey Rourke at thebeginning (just at the beginning..so about 5 min)and ScarlettJohanssons scenes 😉 If you liked transformers 2, you will be satisfiedwith this brainless try of entertainment;

    My native language isn't English.

  4. Egg_MacGuffin from Pennsylvania, USA
    29 Mar 2012, 11:27 pm

    .SPOILERS WITHIN. —————–

    Take note, ladies and gentlemen. This is what happens when you rush asequel into production without first having a quality script…or evena good script. This is simply a poor movie. No doubt that it's fun, butwhen the fundamentals are not there, you still end up dissatisfied.

    What is Tony Stark's goal? This is the most important part of any filmstory and here, it's missing. How does this happen? You can argue thathis goal is to stop Whiplash, but Whiplash is never threatening anybodyapart from the Monaco scene and the extreme end of the story, which istoo few and far between to function as a proper goal for Stark. You canargue that his goal is to find the cure to his blood toxicity to keephimself alive, but he is only actively working toward that goal forless than 5 minutes, most of which is spent on a gag with CaptainAmerica's shield. Then he cures himself with such ease, all tension andconflict is completely killed. SO that can't be his goal, either. Hell,he spent more time driving around for the Audi commercial, whichironically meant as much to the remainder of the story as the new powercell – nothing.

    What is the villain's plan? First of all, who the hell is the villain:Whiplash or Justin Hammer? Hammer simply wants a defense contract,which poses a threat of zero to Stark if he succeeds in getting thecontract. Whiplash has a pasted-in motivation that is as weak as a wetnoodle. He fights Stark at the racetrack and then spends the remainderof the movie sitting in a room on the other side of the country, notthreatening anybody at all (until the very end). It's good that heshowed up with a security uniform on the off-chance that Stark would bedriving a race car that day. Did anybody see where logic went? So withno villain posing any kind of threat to Stark for the entire second actof the story, and Stark having no goal of his own, we're left with ajumbled mess in the middle of the film. Stark acts out and does nothingremotely interesting or exciting because he simply has nothing else todo. His conflict with Pepper was so manufactured, I could almost hearthe clatter of an assembly line every time they were together. It wasentirely non-emotional, and because of that, I couldn't care.

    The hero and villain don't even encounter one another at all in thesecond act of this movie! They are off on their own doing boring crapinstead.

    Nick Fury shows up and drops information in Stark's lap instead ofStark actually finding out for himself. Then Fury is basically gone forthe remainder of the movie. Whatever the hell Scarlett Johansson'scharacter's name was served no purpose at all. Why were thesecharacters even in the movie? I know Scarlett was in because she got towear tight leather and kick ass, which I personally loved, but I wouldappreciate it a bit more if it was somewhat story-related. Of course,you need a story first.

    You can argue that Scarlett had to stop Whiplash from maintainingcontrol of the War Machine suit, but I don't even know how Whiplashgained control of it to begin with! We are never presented with thatinformation. And if he can control War Machine, why not take control ofStark's suit? Hello? Logic? Where did you go? Logic, come back! Theclimax involves an long fight with drones, which becomes nothing morethan robots slugging each other. In the first film, Stark was battlingthe technology that he created and had to learn to outsmart hisopponent because he couldn't outgun him. Here, it's just mindlessaction. There is no threat of danger. The drones pose a threat assevere as a field mouse. Then Whiplash shows up to a scene where abattle was already fought, and they have another battle that is twiceas short as the one with the drones. If you blink, you'll miss it.There is no struggle. No reversals. No tension. No anything.

    Why can't we have a summer action movie that is both fun and good? Youcan even site the first Iron Man as an example. What happened here?This movie is a complete joke and a borderline insult.

    But I think we all know by now that Hollywood only makes sequelsbecause they want money, not because they have a story worthtelling…or a story at all.

    If I didn't see this movie for free, I'd ask for my money back onaccount of a faulty product.

  5. ddin0 from Croatia
    29 Mar 2012, 11:27 pm

    First of all, if you expect to see lots of action in this movie – youwill be disappointed!

    Basically, all the action you will see in this movie is what you saw intrailer. I know people have different tastes. I prefer action overdrama and comedy, some people prefer different. So just so you know,this is written from action lovers point of view. First Iron Man hadlots of action and was pumped with adrenaline, that is the biggestreason I liked it. This part just doesn't cut it for me.

    Here are few things I disliked a lot about this movie:

    – there are a lot of random things in this movie, an example: whilethere is formula race about to begin, Tony decides to jump in one andrace. I don't know if i missed some important part in this movie but Iwas like "What the hell??? That makes no sense how the hell did theylet him???" or Tonies birthday party, man that was some random stuffright there.

    – there is this agent played by Scarlett Johansson. To describe hershortly: she is James Bond 2. She can do anything: beat 20 guards? youbet, hack system made by a guy who hacked into important militarysystem in 10sec? no problem. Just an examples, you will see throughmovie, don't want to spoil it for you.

    – I expected 20-30min intro and then some epic action with greatspecial effects, but I had to wait an hour and a half for that and itwasn't even epic!

    – OK, movie is coming to an end, time for epic battle! Just kidding,fight is over before you say "cookie"

    – stupidity of some scenes concerning highly sophisticated technologyand system (also jail) security, an example: guy breaks throughpentagon-like security system in 10sec, there are more things I'd liketo add but I don't want to spoil it much for you as I mentioned.

    – this movie is… boring. Talking, talking, talking, more talking, theworst part is – this talking isn't even interesting! After 30min oftalking all I heard was bla, bla, bla… If at least it was somethingworth listening to, but only parts worth listening to were where Tonymakes a good joke.

    Now, why did I give it a "high" 5/10 if it was disappointing (overall)?

    1. Great special effects

    2. This movie made me laugh A LOT

    3.Scarlett Johansson looks better then Megan Fox in Transformers.

    This movie should be tagged as (in this order) Comedy, Drama, Thriller,Sci-Fi and Action as last if you ask me.

    I don't think I wasted 2h on watching this, but I expected more, muchmore…

  6. Madhav Behl from India
    29 Mar 2012, 11:27 pm

    Jon Favreau knew exactly what he was doing with this movie. This is asleek, no-holds barred superhero movie, with great performances fromRobert Downey Jr. and Mickey Rourke. Let's face it, it was almostimpossible to top the first one; nevertheless this a good sequel to oneof the best superhero movies ever made.

    Scarlett Johansson fulfilled her role as the the sexy and cunning agentNatasha Romanoff, and Gwyneth Paltrow is fine as Pepper Potts. SamRockwell plays Tony Stark's competitor, and does a pretty good job atit.

    The only problem I have with this movie is that too many things havebeen fitted into 124 minutes. I understand that the movie was meant tobe a roller-coaster ride, intended to thrill, but a little morecharacter development would certainly have helped the movie. Forexample Samuel L. Jackson ans Johansson's characters are underused.Also, the ending was a little disoriented and predictable; somethingjust didn't feel right about it.

    All in all, Jon Favreau has made a movie that would please the fanboysand satisfy the critics. This is a movie that entertains, while stillcomplementing the first movie, and setting up a third movie. If youliked the first movie, just go ahead and watch this movie – you won'tsee a masterpiece, but you'll have a fun day at the movies.

    P.S.- Watch out for the after credits scene

  7. chrismsawin from United States
    29 Mar 2012, 11:27 pm

    Robert Downey Jr was the best reason to watch the first Iron Man filmsince he seemed to slide into the role of Tony Stark so flawlessly andeffortlessly. RDJ is just as amusing and fun to watch in Iron Man 2. Ifthere were any doubts left over from RDJ's portrayal of Tony Stark fromthe first film, they're inevitably washed away with his convincingperformance in the sequel. Newcomers Mickey Rourke, Sam Rockwell, andScarlett Johansson are just as impressive. Rourke has been on anincredible streak since The Wrestler and puts in another solidperformance here. His Russian accent is pretty spot on and he shows awider range of emotion than you may not be expecting. Rockwell has beenon my "actors to keep an eye on" radar since Confessions of a DangerousMind. I thoroughly enjoyed his smarmy performance as Hammer, who hasall of the tools at his disposal to make as big of an impact on theworld as Tony Stark has only to wind up falling short in the long run.The flirting between Tony and Johansson's Natalie Rushman is prettycaptivating, but her crowning achievement is her fight scene in thelatter half of the film that practically steals the show. Don Cheadledoes have a few humorous one-liners and is great as War Machine, butdoesn't really add anything that Terrence Howard already establishedwith the role in the first film. It's slightly disappointing sinceCheadle is known for his strong acting roles, but may be a result ofthe way the Capt. James Rhodes character was written for both films.

    While the film is a worthy sequel, it does contain a few small flaws.What is it with Hollywood films lately having the climactic battleduring the finale last five minutes or less? Transformers: Revenge ofthe Fallen, Clash of the Titans, and Iron Man 2 all share this trait.It doesn't take away from the fact that the conclusion to Iron Man 2 isstill pretty satisfying, but my mindset seems dead set on thinking it'smore satisfying when the antagonist has the advantage. He or she gainsthe upper hand and there's that moment where you think they may bringtheir evil plan to fruition before the protagonist outsmarts theantagonist for the win. When that last battle seems short, it makes itseem like the villain was all talk. Speaking of the action sequencesthough, they're spectacular and twice as big as the action in theoriginal film. The problem is that the action seemed to get blurryduring several of the more hefty action scenes. I'm not sure if it'sbecause it's the way it was shot or what, but it made it seem likethere was too much going on in the film to fully process inpost-production or something.

    Iron Man 2 is an extremely satisfying sequel on all accounts. While theoriginal film is probably slightly better, the sequel does everythingright and doubles up on everything in comparison; action, strongcharacters, teases for upcoming Marvel films, etc. Despite some of itsearly negative criticism, Iron Man 2 delivers a worthwhile sequel witha fantastic cast and spectacular action.

  8. BwSwim from United States
    29 Mar 2012, 11:27 pm

    For some reason this movie had not been getting the greatest criticreviews. I do not understand that at all. I thought the movie was veryenjoyable and a successful sequel in the series.

    For anyone who has seen the first Iron Man you can expect much of thesame in this movie. Robert Downey Jr. plays Tony Stark like he is meantfor the part. He has the same sarcastic wit and self-confidence that isevident in his other movie roles. Gwyeneth Paltrow, as Pepper Potts,has a comes more to the forefront in the sequel. I also personally lovethat Jon Favreau is the driver for Stark/Potts, and that he gets intothe action a little bit. You have to respect the director for that,even though Jon has done plenty of acting himself.

    Normally in when they replace someone in a sequel with a differentactor/actress I am very upset. However, Don Cheadle replacing TerrenceHoward in Iron Man 2 as War Machine/Lt. Rhodes made me happy. This issimilar to what happened with Maggie Gylenhal in the Dark Night.

    Samuel L. Jackson playing Nick Fury has a bigger role, and it leads allthe viewers into wanting The Avengers movie to come out immediately.Scarlett Johansson also showed up with some impressive stunt work,along with her always gorgeous looks.

    All in all it was a well done sequel. The plot is not too convoluted tofollow. The new villain, played by Mickey Rourke, is very impressiveand fun to watch. The action scenes are all entertaining but they donot completely drive the movie. The only thing that I wished forleaving the theater was a longer final fight scene.

    Also, make sure to watch after the credits!! It is short, but worth it.

  9. xamtaro from Singapore
    29 Mar 2012, 11:27 pm

    The sequel to Marvel studio's surprise hit of 2008 is here, bigger thanever. But is it better? After the surprise success of Iron Man,expectations for the sequel, from both movie viewers and long timecomic books fans, were no doubt high.

    Picking off where the first film ended, billionaire genius Tony Starkhas just revealed to the world his identity as the armor cladsuperhero, Iron Man. Now he reaps the whirlwind consequences of hisactions as both the military and unscrupulous competitor Justin Hammervie to obtain the secrets of Stark's Iron Man technology for their owngain. Too add to the flames, Stark soon discovers that the verytechnology that is keeping his heart alive is also poisoning him. As hetries to salvage a life that is slowly falling to pieces and hisgrowing feelings for his long time assistant Pepper Potts(GwynethPaltrow), Starks has to contend to with a foreign weapons genius namedIvan Vanko who seems to bear a deep seated grudge against the ailingbillionaire; a grudge that stemmed from the legacy of Tony's father,Howard Stark.

    Whatever was good in the first movie is carried on in true sequelfashion. The acting and chemistry among the cast is definitely thehighlight of the whole film. Robert Downey Jr IS Tony Stark, thoughless of a playboy following his "change of heart"(figuratively andliterally) in the first movie, but still the same wisecracking, smirkyeccentric. Everyone is just so natural in their roles including thevillains, especially The character of Justin Hammer, played by SamRockwell. Hammer had all the makings of a silly one dimensionalvillainous caricature, but manages to be a well rounded scumbag of acorporate competitor, providing some excellent comic relief while stillpresenting a credible threat to the hero.

    That being said, the script is just littered with witty banter,intelligent jokes and a good number of "Easter eggs" for the long timecomic book fans. Writer Justin Theroux had a good number of interestingthemes going for this movie, most notable of which is the theme of"legacy", of what people leave behind when they are gone; theirimpressions on their successors and how the effects of their pastactions would echo down the years long after one has passed. Starkhimself, faced with his inevitable demise, does not want to leave alegacy of death as a weapons designer. Aside from that, we see how thelegacies of both Stark's and Ivan Vanko's fathers have affected theirpresent lives.

    Now, Vanko's (played by Sin City's Mickey Rourke) is a truly tragictale. It is easy to pass him off as a "darth maul" type character withno other purpose than to provide the hero with a powerful opponent forthe mandatory climax. But to the more attentive viewers, one can seehow Vanko is basically the dark opposite reflection of Tony Stark. Bothare geniuses, both are where they are because of their respectivefathers yet different circumstances in life brought them down entirelydifferent paths. The parallels between his origin story of creating the"whiplash" powered armor from scrap, getting captured(in a similarlyexplosive manner) in order to develop weapons for one man to bring downhis competitor all the way to his cunning escape plan and his mistakenimpression about his dearly departed father are all uncannily similarto Tony Stark's experiences in the first movie that led up to his debutas the hero Iron Man and his mistaken impression about his own father.

    The one thing viewers might not appreciate is that this sequel seems tolack that sense of "fun" that the first film had, taking on a moreserious tone at times to dish out the more complex themes and even aromantic sub-plot. It really is too bad that the more complex themesare there but not really expanded upon. This leaves a lot of "couldhave been more" moments hanging by the time the show ends. At least theaction is satisfying high octane eye candy as Jon Favreau's steadydirecting hand brings out the intensity of every battle scene. Specialeffects are top notch as usual except for a couple of cartoony lookingmoments that do require some suspension of disbelief, for example thebriefcase that transforms into an iron man armor with armor partsseemingly appearing from out of nowhere.

    By the time the all too familiar final battle is over and the creditsstart rolling, one gets the impression that Iron Man 2 could have beena lot more than the sum of its parts. A little longer running timewould have fixed most of the story kinks but perhaps Marvel is merelyusing this movie as a money generator and spring board to somethinggreater.(Blatant teasers are thrown into the narrative itself almostlike a running catalog of future Marvel film projects).

    Topping the first film is no easy feat and of course Iron Man 2 woulddisappoint a few here and there. But it is nonetheless one of the mostentertaining comic book movies that mixes action, wit, drama and castchemistry so well. If widespread appeal is its purpose, then Iron Man 2has fulfilled that function magnificently in that even a newcomer tothe franchise can kick back and enjoy the show. Marvel studios hasstarted a new legacy beyond great comics. Here is a legacy of comicbook movies, true to the spirit of its source material yet tailorednicely to the tastes of the modern movie audience.

  10. Velociraptor256 from United Kingdom
    29 Mar 2012, 11:27 pm

    At its high points – the first act and the climax – Iron Man 2 isactually better than the first film. Everything up to and including theaction scene in Monaco is just great fun to watch: the action, thecharacter interactions, and of course Robert Downey Jr's wonderfulportrayal of Tony Stark. And the action scene at the end is prettyepic.

    The problem is, the film just stops being so much fun in-between. In alarge proportion of this time, it's either going too slowly with littlehappening that's exciting or even particularly interesting, or it'sproviding some silly moments like Iron Man lounging on a giant displaydonut. To be fair, there's no problem with the many subplots this moviehas: they all blend together quite smoothly.

    The acting in this film deserves credit: almost everybody does a greatjob. Robert Downey Jr and Gwyneth Paltrow are just as entertaining asthey were in the first film, Jon Favreau gets more to do as Stark'schauffeur, Don Cheadle is actually a little better than Terrence Howardas Rhodie (again, maybe because he has a bigger role), Mickey Rourkeportrays a decent but overall ordinary villain, and once ScarlettJohansson is allowed to do something substantial with her own actionsequence, she's well worth watching. The only weak link is Sam Rockwellas Justin Hammer, who gets quite annoying after a while.

    Overall, Iron Man 2's slow middle section prevents it from being betterthan the first film as a whole, which is a shame considering howbrilliant the beginning and end segments are.

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